Results for 'Schumpeter'

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  1. Popular Rule in Schumpeter's Democracy.Sean Ingham - 2016 - Political Studies 64 (4):1071-1087.
    In this article, it is argued that existing democracies might establish popular rule even if Joseph Schumpeter’s notoriously unflattering picture of ordinary citizens is accurate. Some degree of popular rule is in principle compatible with apathetic, ignorant and suggestible citizens, contrary to what Schumpeter and others have maintained. The people may have control over policy, and their control may constitute popular rule, even if citizens lack definite policy opinions and even if their opinions result in part from elites’ (...)
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  2.  72
    Schumpeter, Alois.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2006 - In Virgilio Melchiorre (ed.), Enciclopedia filosofica. Milano: Bompiani. pp. 10210-10212.
    A short presentation of Schumpeter's work with spedial attention to its philophical backgroound.
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  3. Democracy Before, In, and After Schumpeter.Pettit Philip - 2017 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 29 (4):492-504.
    The classical model of democracy that Schumpeter criticizes is manufactured out of a variety of earlier ideas, not those of any one thinker or even one school of thought. His critique of the central ideals by which he defines the model--those of the common will and the common good--remains persuasive. People's preferences are too messy and too manipulable to allow us to think that mass democracy can promote those ideals, as he defines them. Should we endorse his purely electoral (...)
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  4. Parallel Experimentation: A Basic Scheme for Dynamic Efficiency.David Ellerman - 2014 - Journal of Bioeconomics 16 (3):259–287.
    Evolutionary economics often focuses on the comparison between economic competition and the process of natural selection to select the fitter members of a given population. But that neglects the other "half" of an evolutionary process, the mechanism for the generation of new possibilities that is key to dynamic efficiency. My topic is the process of parallel experimentation which I take to be a process of multiple experiments running concurrently with some form of common goal, with some semi-isolation between the experiments, (...)
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  5.  34
    What Is Innovation?Vincent Blok - 2021 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 25 (1):72-96.
    In this article, I reflect on the nature of innovation to lay the groundwork for a philosophy of innovation. First, I contrast the contemporary techno-economic paradigm of innovation with the work of Joseph Schumpeter. It becomes clear that Schumpeter’s work provides good reasons to question the techno-economic paradigm of innovation. Second, I contrast ‘innovation’ with ‘technology’ and identify five differences between the two concepts. Third, I reflect on the process-outcome dimension and the ontic-ontological dimension of innovation to develop (...)
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  6.  17
    Towards an Ontology of Innovation : On the New, the Political-Economic Dimension and the Intrinsic Risks Involved in Innovation Processes.V. Blok - 2020 - In Routledge Handbook of philosophy of Engineering. routledge.
    Because the techno-economic paradigm of contemporary conceptualizations of innovation is often taken for granted in the literature, this chapter opens up this self-evident notion. First, the chapter consults the work of Joseph Schumpeter, who can be seen as the founding father of the current conceptualization of innovation as technological and commercial. Second, we open up the concept by reflecting on two aspects of Schumpeter’s conceptualization of innovation, namely its destructive and its constructive aspect, based on findings in the (...)
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  7.  30
    Value Creation as the Foundation of Economics.Robert Allinson - 2009 - In L. Zsolnai (ed.), Ethical Prospects. pp. 63-87.
    The argument of this paper, written by an ethicist and a philosopher, is that self-interest economics is fundamentally flawed and needs to be replaced by a spiritual economics or a value based economics. Its argument contains two interwoven threads. One thread is an attempt to show why the fundamental philosophical notions of Adam Smith, taken as an illustration of self-interest economics, cannot lead to an equitable society. Smith’s Wealth of Nations, according to Jacob Viner, ‘ became a significant factor in (...)
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  8. The Entrepreneur of the Self Beyond Foucault’s Neoliberal Homo Oeconomicus.Tim Christiaens - 2020 - European Journal of Social Theory 23 (4):493-511.
    In his lectures on neoliberalism, Michel Foucault argues that neoliberalism produces subjects as ‘entrepreneurs of themselves’. He bases this claim on Gary Becker’s conception of the utility-maximizing agent who solely acts upon cost/benefit-calculations. Not all neoliberalized subjects, however, are encouraged to maximize their utility through mere calculation. This article argues that Foucault’s description of neoliberal subjectivity obscures a non-calculative, more audacious side to neoliberal subjectivity. Precarious workers in the creative industries, for example, are encouraged not merely to rationally manage their (...)
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  9. The Challenge of Evo-Devo: Implications for Evolutionary Economists.George Liagouras - manuscript
    Usually evolutionary economists equate evolutionary theory with modern Darwinism. However the rise of evolutionary developmental biology (Evo-Devo) puts into question the monopoly of Darwinism in evolutionary biology. The major divergences between the two paradigms in evolutionary biology are drawn in the analysis of three trade-offs: population vs. typological thinking, creative role of natural selection vs. internal (inherent) change, and microevolution vs. macroevolution. It is argued here that the Evo-Devo breakthrough helps to better understand the limits to Darwinism in the social (...)
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  10.  55
    L Dumont, 'From Mandeville to Marx'. [REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1980 - Rivista Internazionale di Scienze Sociali 89 (2):743-748.
    Alongside the aspects of interest in the history of ideas in general, this text is of great interest to the economist and the philosopher of economics. The parts on Smith and Marx are a demonstration of how it is possible to make a history of scientific thought that explains the incongruities of the history of thought in front of which Schumpeter stops: these incongruities cease to be mysterious, and indeed they acquire full meaning if we accept the idea of (...)
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  11. On Creatively Destructing.Konstantina Kalfa - 2014 - Rethinking Marxism 26 (4):581-591.
    Capitalism—as Marx has shown and Schumpeter has reminded us—has always promoted creative destruction practices. What in fact helps capitalism survive is the constant renewal of its products, modes of production, and needs through its own self-destructiveness. Capitalist destruction is a clearing out, a maneuver, a revaluation, and the presupposition for creation, all at once. It is a unification, the embracing of multiple and seemingly incompatible activities whose common component mainly consists in positivity: in their ability to reverse, to beautify (...)
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  12. Teoria Democrática Contemporânea.Emanuel Isaque Cordeiro da Silva - manuscript
    A partir do século XIX, a teoria democrática foi desenvolvida com base no confronto entre duas doutrinas políticas: o liberalismo e o socialismo. O liberalismo é um projeto que defende as limitações dos poderes governamentais, buscando a proteção dos direitos econômicos, políticos, religiosos e intelectuais dos membros da sociedade. Ou seja, para os liberais o poder do Estado deve ser limitado, pois eles acreditam que a verdadeira liberdade depende da menor interferência possível do Estado e das leis nesses direitos. A (...)
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