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Stanislav Roudavski
University of Melbourne
  1.  48
    Towards More-Than-Human Heritage: Arboreal Habitats as a Challenge for Heritage Preservation.Stanislav Roudavski & Julian Rutten - 2020 - Built Heritage 4 (4):1-17.
    Trees belong to humanity’s heritage, but they are more than that. Their loss, through catastrophic fires or under business-as-usual, is devastating to many forms of life. Moved by this fact, we begin with an assertion that heritage can have an active role in the design of future places. Written from within the field of architecture, this article focuses on structures that house life. Habitat features of trees and artificial replacement habitats for arboreal wildlife serve as concrete examples. Designs of such (...)
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  2. Field Creativity and Post-Anthropocentrism.Stanislav Roudavski - 2016 - Digital Creativity 27 (1):7-23.
    Can matter, things, nonhuman organisms, technologies, tools and machines, biota or institutions be seen as creative? How does such creativity reposition the visionary activities of humans? This article is an elaboration of such questions as well as an attempt at a partial response. It was written as an editorial for the special issue of the Digital Creativity journal that interrogates the conception of Post-Anthropocentric Creativity. However, the text below is a rather unconventional editorial. It does not attempt to provide an (...)
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  3.  24
    Notes on More-Than-Human Architecture.Stanislav Roudavski - 2018 - In Gretchen Coombs, Andrew McNamara & Gavin Sade (eds.), Undesign: Critical Practices at the Intersection of Art and Design. Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 24-37.
    What can the creation of artificial habitats to replace old-growth forests tell us about the process, value and future of design? This chapter takes a concrete and provocative example and uses it to rethink design as a gradual, ecological action. To illustrate this understanding, the chapter begins with a description of a proposal to provide artificial habitats for wild animals such as birds, bats and invertebrates. The controversial idea to replace rapidly disappearing old-growth trees with artificial structures puts in doubt (...)
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