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Pawel Tarasiewicz
Adler-Aquinas Institute, Manitou Springs, CO, USA
  1. The Common Sense Personalism of St. John Paul II.Tarasiewicz Pawel - 2014 - Studia Gilsoniana 3 (supplement):619-634.
    The article aims at showing that the philosophical personalism of Pope John Paul II stems from the common sense approach to reality. First, it presents Karol Wojtyla as a framer of the Lublin Philosophical School, to which he was affiliated for 24 years before being elected Pope John Paul II; it shows Wojtyla’s role in establishing this original philosophical School by his contribution to its endorsement of Thomism, its way of doing philosophy, and its classically understood personalism. Secondly, it identifies (...)
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  2.  19
    Between Politics and Religion – In Search of the Golden Mean.Tarasiewicz Pawel - 2012 - Studia Gilsoniana 1:117-131.
    The author undertakes the problem of the identity of Western civilization in the light of a correlation between politics and religion. First, he traces the theoretical debates about the mutual correspondence of politics and religion in ancient Greece. Following two extreme errors depicted by Sophocles in his “Antigone,” and by Plato in his “Apology of Socrates,” he infers that the “Golden Mean” is necessary in resolving the problem of politics and religion. Then, he examines the underlying errors put forward in (...)
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  3.  44
    Recovering Philosophy as the Love of Wisdom: A Contribution of St. John Paul II.Tarasiewicz Pawel - 2016 - Studia Gilsoniana 5 (1):269-281.
    The article aims at demonstrating that, by his teaching on human person and his action, St. John Paul II implicitly contributed to a resolution of the most serious problem of contemporary philosophy, which consists in separating wisdom from love and substituting wisdom with understanding or knowledge. The author concludes that John Paul II makes a persuasive contribution to recover philosophy as the love of wisdom by identifying truth in the area of freedom, self-fulfillment and conscience, and appealing to man’s honesty (...)
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  4.  40
    Contemplation: If It Makes for Peace, Why Not for Christian Witness Too?Tarasiewicz Pawel - 2017 - Studia Gilsoniana 6 (1):85-96.
    The author attempts to answer the following question: Why does Christian witness need contemplation? He claims that Christian witness needs contemplation, because contemplation reveals the truth about the nature of reality; it is this truth which is one of the factors that constitute the foundation of Christian faith. In a sense, contemplation is analogical to mysticism: as mystical visions make Christian belief grounded on the immediate experience of the Truth, so the contemplation of the creatures makes Christian belief based on (...)
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  5.  33
    Philosophy in Seminaries.Tarasiewicz Pawel - 2013 - Studia Gilsoniana 2:161-173.
    The author attempts to answer the question concerning whether or not philosophy is needed in seminaries. In light of his analysis, it can be concluded that philosophical studies for future priests are a serious alternative to the fideistic positions often adopted by Catholics. The presence of philosophy in the seminary curriculum is supported by: the need for building intellectual foundations of the religious faith professed by a cleric; the faith which cannot do without reason and abstain from justifying the rationale (...)
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  6.  21
    The Principal Assignment of Philosophy in Culture.Tarasiewicz Pawel - 2012 - Studia Gilsoniana 1:133-146.
    The following article is focused on the question of the primary task of philosophy in culture. The problem of philosophy itself is the starting point here. The author observes a chronic discord among philosophers on what philosophy is that undermines the identity of the afore-mentioned as well as disables it from determining its tasks in the culture. Thus, he attempts to determine the nature of philosophy indirectly. The author indicates what philosophy is not and has never been from its beginning, (...)
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