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W. John Koolage
Eastern Michigan University
  1.  68
    Chemical Action: What is It and Why Does It Really Matter?W. John Koolage & W. John Koolage & Ralph Hall - 2011 - Journal of Nanoparticle Research 13 (13):1401-1427.
    Nanotechnology, as with many technologies before it, places a strain on existing legislation and poses a challenge to all administrative agencies tasked with regulating technology-based products. It is easy to see how statutory schemes become outdated, as our ability to understand and affect the world progresses. In this article, we address the regulatory problems that nanotechnology posses for the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) classification structure for ‘‘drugs’’ and ‘‘devices.’’ The last major modification to these terms was in 1976, with (...)
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  2. Reasoning, Science, and the Ghost Hunt.W. John Koolage & Timothy Hansel - 2017 - Teaching Philosophy 40 (2):201-229.
    This paper details how ghost hunting, as a set of learning activities, can be used to enhance critical thinking and philosophy of science classes. We describe in some detail our own work with ghost hunting, and reflect on both intended and unintended consequences of this pedagogical choice. This choice was partly motivated by students’ lack of familiarity with science and philosophic questions about it. We offer reflections on our three different implementations of the ghost hunting activities. In addition, we discuss (...)
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  3.  76
    Undergraduate Conferences as High Impact Practices with an Impact on Gender Parity.W. John Koolage & Danielle Clevenger - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):261-284.
    There has been a recent explosion of undergraduate philosophy conferences across the United States. In this paper, we explore undergraduate conferences along three lines. First, we argue that, as a well-designed learning activity, undergraduate conferences can serve to increase gender parity in philosophical spaces—a widely accepted and important goal for our discipline. Second, we argue that this increase in parity is due, at least in part, to the proper design of undergraduate conferences as High-Impact Practices. Our empirical work on our (...)
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