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  1. Humans and the Soil.Daniel C. Fouke - 2011 - Environmental Ethics 33 (2):147-161.
    The way we farm, the kinds of backyards and landscapes we favor, and the way we control patterns of development are creating an invisible crisis through their affects upon soil ecology. The invisibility of soil ecosystems, the seemingly alien properties of the organisms that inhabit them, and the specialized knowledge required to understand them create obstacles to moral concern for these fountains of life. Our treatment of soils has reached the point of crisis. Obstacles to moral thinking about soils might (...)
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  2. Is It Possible to Create an Ecologically Sustainable World Order: The Implications of Hierarchy Theory for Human Ecology.Arran Gare - 2000 - International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology 7 (4):277-290.
    Human ecology, it is argued, even when embracing recent developments in the natural sciences and granting a place to culture, tends to justify excessively pessimistic conclusions about the prospects for creating a sustainable world order. This is illustrated through a study of the work and assumptions of Richard Newbold Adams and Stephen Bunker. It is argued that embracing hierarchy theory as this has been proposed and elaborated by Herbert Simon, Howard Pattee, T.F.H. Allen and others enables human ecology to conceive (...)
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  3. The Geography of Human Societies.Donato Bergandi - 1998 - In P. Acot (ed.), The European Origins of Scientific Ecology. Gordon & Breach. pp. 521-533.
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