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  1. Review of Erfahrungen des ki. Leibessphäre, Atmosphäre, Pansphäre. [REVIEW]Leon Krings - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:333-336.
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  2. Leibliches Üben als Teil einer philosophischen Lebenskunst: Die Verkörperung von Kata in den japanischen Wegkünsten.Leon Krings - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:179-197.
    In this paper, I try to show how Japanese practices of self-cultivation found in the so-called “ways” can be interpreted as embodied forms of “caring for oneself ” and, therefore, as part of a philosophical Lebenskunst or art of living. To this end, I refer to phenomenological accounts of the body as well as to a unique notion of practice found in the writings of Dōgen Kigen, a thirteenth-century Japanese Zen master. Central to this essay is a concern with embodying (...)
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  3. Nishida and Merleau-Ponty: Art, “Depth,” and “Seeing without a Seer”.Adam Loughnane - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:47-74.
    This paper sets Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Nishida Kitarō in dialogue and explore the interpretations of artistic expression, which inform their similar phenomenological accounts of perception. I discuss how both philosophers look to artistic practice to reveal multi-perspectival aspects of vision. They do so, I argue, by going beyond a “positivist” representational under-standing of perception and by including negative aspects of visual experience as constitutive of vision. Following this account, I interpret artworks by Cézanne, Guo Xi, Rodin, and Hasegawa according to (...)
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  4. Verso l’estetica del luogo: Per una monadologia polifonica.Masaru Yoneyama - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:203-217.
    This paper aims to develop Nishida Kitarō’s “logic of place” into an “aesthetics of place.” While brilliantly fusing the Buddhist traditions of Japan with Western philosophy, in his later years, Nishida came up with his own unique philosophy, a “monadology with the concept of substance.” This is a concept anchored in mu or “emptiness.” From this standpoint, how is the individual understood and how does society take shape? The answers to these questions are fundamental keys to understanding Japanese philosophy. In (...)
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  5. Manga and Philosophy: Why Was the Book “Manga Introduction to Philosophy” Written?Masahiro Morioka - 2015 - The Review of Life Studies 6:1-28.
    Slightly modified PowerPoint slides in the PDF format presented at the first conference of the European Network of Japanese Philosophy, Barcelona, Spain. (December 4th, 2015).
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  6. Japanese Aesthetics - Ch. 23.Mara Miller - 2011 - In Jay L. Garfield & William Edelglass (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of World Philosophy. Oup Usa. pp. 317-333.
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  7. Nishida Kitaro's First Notion of Beauty.Montserrat Crespín Perales - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 29:129-138.
    Although we cannot find any Aesthetics system in the works of NISHIDA Kitarõ (1870-1945), the most significant and influential Japanese philosopher of the twentieth-century, one of his central themes is the role of art and aesthetics in relation with morality and religion. His aesthetics approaches are magnificent examples of his aim to overcome the innate dualism that sustains modern epistemology and a door, apparently hidden, to a better understanding of all his speculative scheme of philosophy. This paper attempts to throw (...)
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  8. The Varieties of Pure Experience: William James and Kitaro Nishida on Consciousness and Embodiment.Joel Krueger - 2006 - William James Studies 1.
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  9. Visual Perception in Japanese Rock Garden Design.Gert J. van Tonder & Michael J. Lyons - 2005 - Global Philosophy 15 (3):353-371.
    We present an investigation into the relation between design princi- ples in Japanese gardens, and their associated perceptual effects. This leads to the realization that a set of design principles described in a Japanese gardening text by Shingen (1466), shows many parallels to the visual effects of perceptual grouping, studied by the Gestalt school of psychology. Guidelines for composition of rock clusters closely relate to perception of visual figure. Garden design elements are arranged into patterns that simplify figure-ground segmentation, while (...)
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  10. Four Approaches to Emotion in Japanese Visual Arts.Mara Miller - 2004 - In Paolo Santangelo (ed.), Emotion in Asia. Universita degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale.
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