Contents
16 found
Order:
  1. Darwin versus Kant and Hume.Justin Le Saux - manuscript
    I claim evolution through natural selection is inconsistent with Kantian epistemology, because there is nothing about humans or 'the mind' which does not vary, so its inappropriate to base universal laws of nature on how the variable mind might generates experience. I also claim that the apparent self sufficient world presented by natural selection is at least suspiciously inconsistent with Hume's views that it is impossible to see how anything could itself (be sufficient to) produce anything.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Kant on the Highest Good and Moral Arguments.Alexander T. Englert & Andrew Chignell - forthcoming - In Andrew Stephenson & Anil Gomes (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Kant. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Kant’s accounts of the Highest Good and the moral argument for God and immortality are central features of his philosophy. But both involve lingering puzzles. In this entry, we first explore what the Highest Good is for Kant and the role it plays in a complete account of ethical life. We then focus on whether the Highest Good involves individuals only, or whether it also connects with Kant’s doctrines about the moral progress of the species. In conclusion, we look into (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Kant on Evil.Melissa McBay Merritt - forthcoming - In Andrew Stephenson & Anil Gomes (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Kant. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    The chapter examines Kant’s thesis about the ‘radical evil in human nature’ developed in his Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason. According to this thesis, the human moral condition is corrupt by default and yet by own deed; and this corruption is the origin (root, radix) of human badness in all its variety, banality, and ubiquity. While Kant clearly takes radical evil to be endemic in human nature, controversy reigns about how to understand this. Some assume this can only (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Kant e Leibniz sobre o problema da teodiceia.Bruno Cunha - 2024 - Kant Em Diálogo.
    O pensamento de Leibniz foi, sem dúvida, essencial para o desenvolvimento das linhas fundamentais da filosofia crítico-transcendental de Kant. A interlocução entre Kant e Leibniz é evidente no decorrer do pensamento kantiano, seja diretamente, nos diversos momentos em que Kant busca um enfrentamento explícito com seu predecessor, seja indiretamente, quando Kant discute com os autores da escolástica alemã que são considerados discípulos de Leibniz Pretendo observar, em particular, que uma das discussões pouco noticiadas, mas de grande relevância para o desenvolvimento (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Demoralization and Hope: A Psychological Reading of Kant’s Moral Argument.Andrew Chignell - 2023 - The Monist 106 (1):46-60.
    Kant’s “primacy of the practical” doctrine says that we can form morally justified commitments regarding what exists, even in the absence of sufficient epistemic grounds. In this paper I critically examine three different varieties of Kant’s “moral proof” that can be found in the critical works. My claim is that the third variety—the “moral-psychological argument” based in the need to sustain moral hope and avoid demoralization—has some intriguing advantages over the other two. It starts with a premise that more clearly (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6. Physicotheology in Kant's Transition from Nature to Freedom.Nabeel Hamid - 2023 - Kantian Review 28 (2):201-219.
    This paper examines Kant’s treatment of the design argument for the existence of God, or physicotheology. It criticizes the interpretation that, for Kant, the assumption of intelligent design satisfies an internal demand of inquiry. It argues that Kant’s positive appraisal of physicotheology is instead better understood on account of its polemical utility for rebutting objections to practical belief in God upon which Kant’s ethicotheological argument rests, and thus as an instrument in the transition from theoretical to practical philosophy. Kantian physicotheology (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Purposiveness, the Idea of God, and the Transition from Nature to Freedom in the Critique of Judgment.Caroline Bowman - 2021 - In Camilla Serck-Hanssen & Beatrix Himmelmann (eds.), The Court of Reason: Proceedings of the 13th International Kant Congress. De Gruyter. pp. 931-940.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. Wolff’s Science of Teleology and Kant’s Critique.Nabeel Hamid - 2019 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6.
    This essay examines Wolff’s science of teleology, which has historically been dismissed as a crude physico-theology resting on a simple confusion between uses and purposes. Focusing especially on his two German volumes (German Teleology, 1723, and German Physiology, 1725), I argue that, first, Wolff never intended teleology to be a self-standing theology; and second, that teleology, as a part of physics, is primarily an applied or practical discipline. In its theological function, teleology presupposes the ontological and cosmological arguments for the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. Kant on the ‘Guarantee of Perpetual Peace’ and the Ideal of the United Nations.Lucas Thorpe - 2019 - Dokuz Eylül University Journal of Humanities 6 (1):223-245..
    The ideal of the United Nations was first put forward by Immanuel Kant in his 1795 essay Perpetual Peace. Kant, in the tradition of Locke and Rousseau is a liberal who believes that relations between individuals can either be based upon law and consent or upon force and violence. One way that such the ideal of world peace could be achieved would be through the creation of a single world state, of which every human being was a citizen. Such an (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Dutifully Wishing: Kant’s Re-evaluation of a Strange Species of Desire.Alexander T. Englert - 2017 - Kantian Review 22 (3):373-394.
    Kant uses ‘wish’ as a technical term to denote a strange species of desire. It is an instance in which someone wills an object that she simultaneously knows she cannot bring about. Or in more Kantian garb: it is an instance of the faculty of desire’s (or will’s) failing insofar as a desire (representation) cannot be the cause of the realization of its corresponding object in reality. As a result, Kant originally maintained it to be antithetical to morality, which deals (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  11. Beyond the Paralogisms: The Proofs of Immortality in the Lectures on Metaphysics.Corey W. Dyck - 2015 - In Robert R. Clewis (ed.), Reading Kant's Lectures. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 115-134.
    Considered in light of the reader’s expectation of a thoroughgoing criticism of the pretensions of the rational psychologist, and of the wealth of discussions available in the broader 18th century context, which includes a variety of proofs that do not explicitly turn on the identification of the soul as a simple substance, Kant’s discussion of immortality in the Paralogisms falls lamentably short. However, outside of the Paralogisms (and the published works generally), Kant had much more to say about the arguments (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12. Kant’s Religion and the Reflective Judgment.Noam Hoffer - 2013 - In Stefano Bacin, Alfredo Ferrarin, Claudio La Rocca & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Kant und die Philosophie in weltbürgerlicher Absicht. Akten des XI. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Boston: de Gruyter. pp. 883-898.
    Kant's “Religion Within the Boundaries of Mere Reason” seems an odd element in Kant's oeuvre. Parts of it seem like scholastic theology or an arbitrary effort to reconcile the Kantian philosophical system with the doctrines of Christianity1. One of the most troubling notions is that of radical evil. Not only is the motivation for introducing the notion unclear, it is also difficult to grasp the line of argumentation, and furthermore accept its conclusion that there must be an innate propensity for (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. The Wolffian roots of Kant’s teleology.Hein van den Berg - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):724-734.
    Kant’s teleology as presented in the Critique of Judgment is commonly interpreted in relation to the late eighteenth-century biological research of Johann Friedrich Blumenbach. In the present paper, I show that this interpretative perspective is incomplete. Understanding Kant’s views on teleology and biology requires a consideration of the teleological and biological views of Christian Wolff and his rationalist successors. By reconstructing the Wolffian roots of Kant’s teleology, I identify several little known sources of Kant’s views on biology. I argue that (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  14. Review: Anderson-Gold & Muchnik (eds), Kant's Anatomy of Evil. [REVIEW]Paul Formosa - 2011 - Kantian Review 16 (2):150-56.
    Book review of Anderson-Gold & Muchnik (eds), Kant's Anatomy of Evil.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Kant’s Moral Panentheism.Stephen Palmquist - 2008 - Philosophia 36 (1):17-28.
    Although Kant is often interpreted as an Enlightenment Deist, Kant scholars are increasingly recognizing aspects of his philosophy that are more amenable to theism. If Kant regarded himself as a theist, what kind of theist was he? The theological approach that best fits Kant’s model of God is panentheism, whereby God is viewed as a living being pervading the entire natural world, present ‘in’ every part of nature, yet going beyond the physical world. The purpose of Kant’s restrictions on our (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  16. Kant and the Problem of God, Gordon E. Michalson. [REVIEW]Jacqueline Mariña - 2001 - Modern Theology 17 (3):395-397.
    This is a review of Gordon Michalson's book on Kant and religion.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark