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  1. Lenguaje, coraje y utopía: comentario y discusión de las lecturas contemporáneas de Plato und die Dichter de Gadamer.Facundo Bey - 2021 - Tópicos, Revista de Filosofía 60:229-268.
    Abstract: In 1934 Gadamer delivered the lecture Plato und die Dichter. Its central topic was the relationship between poetry, philosophy and politics in Plato’s thought. Gadamer developed an original phenomenological investigation on Plato’s ethical-political philosophy and the role that art played in it, in which the dimension of language and the meaning of utopia are structural for his arguments. This article aims, in the first place, to elucidate some political dimensions of Plato und die Dichter. In order to do this, (...)
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  2. Sleepless in Syracuse: Plato and the Nocturnal Council.Andrew Hull - 2019 - In Heather Reid & Mark Ralkowski (eds.), Plato at Syracuse: Essays on Plato in Western Greece with a new translation of the Seventh Letter by Jonah Radding. Parnassos Press- Fonte Aretusa. pp. 121-129.
    I defend the Seventh Letter, traditionally attributed to Plato, against Michael Frede's argument that it presents a political philosophy inconsistent with that found in the Laws. Frede argues that Plato had given up the idea of the philosopher-king in his Laws, but the 7th Letter seems to be still committed to the project. I argue the Laws, particularly with the introduction of the Nocturnal Council, has Philosopher-Rulers in all but name. I consider the education of the Nocturnal Council and how (...)
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  3. What Rules and Laws Does Socrates Obey.David Lévystone - 2019 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 57:57-75.
    Socrates ́ thought of justice and obedience to laws is moti- vated by a will to avoid the destructive effects of Sophistic criti- cisms and theories of laws. He thus requires–against theories of natural law–an almost absolute obedience to the law, as far as this law respects the legal system of the city. But, against legal positivism, Socrates would not admit that a law is just simply because it is a law: he is looking for the true Just. However, as (...)
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  4. The Law in Plato’s Laws: A Reading of the ‘Classical Thesis’.Luke William Hunt - 2018 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 35 (1):102-126.
    Plato’s Laws include what H.L.A. Hart called the ‘classical thesis’ about the nature and role of law: the law exists to see that one leads a morally good life. This paper develops Hart’s brief remarks by providing a panorama of the classical thesis in Laws. This is done by considering two themes: (1) the extent to which Laws is paternalistic, and (2) the extent to which Laws is naturalistic. These themes are significant for a number of reasons, including because they (...)
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  5. The Value of Rule in Plato’s Dialogues: A Reply to Melissa Lane.David Ebrey - 2016 - Plato Journal 16:75-80.
    A reply to Melissa Lane's "Antianarchia: interpreting political thought in Plato" In these comments I focus on how to think of antianarchia as an element of Plato's political thought, and in doing so raise some methodological questions about how to read Plato’s dialogues, focusing on what is involved in attributing views to Plato in general.
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  6. Aspects of Plato's Political Thinking in the Timaeus and the 10th Book of Laws.Panagiotis Pavlos - 2013 - In Alexey V. Tsyb (ed.), ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΠΟΛΙΣ: Philosophy of Antiquity as an interdisciplinary synthesis of philosophical, historical and philological studies. Sociological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg's Plato Society. pp. 40-44.
    Short communication published in the Proceedings of the International Summer School for Young Researchers Platwnopolis, in St. Petersburg, Russia, 2012.
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  7. Plato's Republic in Its Athenian Context.Debra Nails - 2012 - History of Political Thought 33 (1):1-23.
    Plato's Republic critiques Athenian democracy as practised during the Peloponnesian War years. The diseased city Socrates attempts to purge mirrors Athens in crucial particulars, and his proposals should be evaluated as counter-weights to existing institutions and practices, not as absolutes to be instantiated. Plato's assessment of the Athenian polity incorporates two strategies -- one rhetorical, the other argumentative -- both of which I address. Failure to consider Athens a catalyst for Socrates' arguments has led to the misconception that Plato was (...)
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  8. Plato on the Sovereignty of Law.Zena Hitz - 2009 - In Ryan Balot (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Greek and Roman Political Thought. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 367-381.
    This paper is in part an introduction to Plato's late political philosophy. In the central sections, I look at Plato's Laws and Statesman and ask the question of how law can produce authentic virtue. If law is merely coercive or habituating, but virtue requires rational understanding, there will be a gap between what law can do and what it is supposed to do. I examine the solution to this difficulty proposed in the Laws, the persuasive preludes attached to the laws, (...)
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  9. Socrates and Superiority.Nathan Hanna - 2007 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):251-268.
    I propose an alternative interpretation of the Crito. The arguments that are typically taken to be Socrates’ primary arguments against escape are actually supplementary arguments that rely on what I call the Superiority Thesis, the thesis that the state and its citizens are members of a moral hierarchy where those below are tied by bonds of obligation to those above. I provide evidence that Socrates holds this thesis, demonstrate how it resolves a number of apparent difficulties and show why my (...)
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