Plato

Edited by Hugh Benson (University of Oklahoma)
Assistant editor: Mark Hallap (University of Toronto, St. George Campus)
View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories
Subcategories:
History/traditions: Plato

1285 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
1 — 50 / 1285
Material to categorize
  1. The Ontological Import of Parmenides' Metaphor: A Reading of the Proemium.Yannis Chatzantonis - manuscript
    The aim of this essay is to consider the nature of the philosophical task and of the conditions of its possibility according to Parmenides and Plato. With these thinkers, the task of the philosopher necessitates a propaedeutic activity that makes the doing of philosophy possible; that is, both Parmenides and Plato identify the need for a philosophical education that would alleviate the obstacles that would make philosophy impossible to practise, ensuring and accounting for the possibility of philosophical practice. The impossibility (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. On Justice as Dance.Joshua M. Hall - forthcoming - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture.
    This article is part of a larger project that explores how to channel people’s passion for popular arts into legal social justice, by reconceiving law as a kind of poetry and justice as dance, and exploring different possible relationships between said legal poetry and dancing justice. I begin by rehearsing my previous new conception of social justice as organismic empowerment, and my interpretive method of dancing-with. I then apply this method to the following four “ethico-political choreographies of justice”: (1) the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. L’aristotélisation gadamérienne de Platon ou l’herméneutique dialogique à la lumière du problème de l’ironie.Antoine Pageau-St-Hilaire - 2016 - Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique 12:1-19.
    Cette étude cherche à rendre compte d’un trait particulier et pratiquement inobservé dans la fondation gadamérienne de l’herméneutique philosophique. Si l’on connaît bien le rôle du platonisme — et plus spécifiquement du dialogue platonicien — parmi les sources au sein desquelles Gadamer a puisé pour formuler le caractère dialogique du comprendre, on a rarement noté que la phénoménologie du dialogue sur laquelle s’appuie une telle fondation s’inscrivait en faux par rapport à son modèle sur un point bien précis : l’ironie, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Reading Plato's Dialogues to Enhance Learning and Inquiry: Exploring Socrates' Use of Protreptic for Student Engagement.Mason Marshall - 2020 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    Along with fresh interpretations of Plato, this book proposes a radically new approach to reading him, one that can teach us about protreptic, as it is called, by reimagining the ways in which Socrates engages in it. Protreptic, as it is conceived in the book, is an attempt to bring about a fundamental change of heart in people so that they want truth more than anything else. In taking the approach developed in this book, one doesn't try to get Plato (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Knowledge and Forms in Plato's Educational Philosophy.Mason Marshall - 2020 - Educational Theory 70 (2):215-229.
    In this paper, I argue that Plato's views on Forms play a central role in his educational philosophy. In response to what certain commentators have recently written, I contend that this interpretation not only is accurate but also is advantageous because of how it can help philosophy of education. I also address the view, proposed by one philosopher of education, that Plato believes that the most valuable sort of knowledge cannot be fully expressed in words and that the objects of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Zaki Nageeb’s Criticism of Greek Philosophy.Abduljaleel Kadhim Alwali - 1997 - Arab Philosophical Journal 5 (1):88-100.
    Zeki Najib Mahmoud’s Critique of Greek Philosophy This research compares Dr. Zeki Najib Mahmoud’s criticism of Greek philosophy tenets to the original texts by focusing on five areas: 1.A criticism of the Platonic and Aristotelian concept of art. 2.A criticism of Plato’s metaphysics. 3. A criticism of Aristotle’s logic and his two theories relevant to identification and the four causes. 4.A criticism of the Greek philosophical concepts of the circle and virtue. 5.The employment of the analytical method in criticizing Socrates (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Anito e o suborno de jurados (dekázein) nos processos atenienses.Carlos Carvalhar - 2021 - Calíope: Presença Clássica 40:167-188.
    Anito é mais conhecido por ser um dos acusadores de Sócrates, mas este político teve outra proeza: sua sagacidade o fez criar um método obscuro de identificar os jurados e assim saber exatamente a quem subornar em um processo legal, ou seja, ele conseguia identificar quem eram os dikastaí que estariam agrupados no dikastḗrion específico que julgaria determinado caso em um tribunal. Com essa metodologia ele conseguiu se safar de uma condenação em 409 a.e.c., quando por sua falha Atenas perdeu (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Role of the Educator in the Just Society.Oxenberg Richard - 2007 - CAEC 12.
    In this brief article I reflect on our culture's moral ambiguity, as reflected in the popularity of such shows as The Sopranos, and argue for the need for a morally attuned philosophical education to address it.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Review of Balot, Greek Political Thought. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2007 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 8:13.
    Balot’s (B.) Greek Political Thought aims to provide an “introductory guide” for undergraduate and graduate students to ancient Greek thinkers (broadly construed) from Homer through Epicurus who wrote in both systematic and unsystematic ways about life in the Greek polis (viii). B. notes that he has not tried to locate his arguments within current scholarly discussions (although he does include a 19 page bibliographic essay that provides an overview of Anglophone scholarship on Greek political thought). Nonetheless, he states that he (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Review of Destrée and Giannopoulou, Eds., Plato's Symposium: A Critical Guide. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2018 - Classical Journal 10:03.
    Destrée and Giannopoulou have provided scholars with thirteen exegetically rich and philosophically sophisticated chapters on Plato’s Symposium, written for the most part by scholars with numerous publications (in several cases, numerous books) on Plato, classical Greek moral psychology, and ancient Greek philosophy. Many of the chapters warrant discussion at least to the length that I am allotted for my review of the entire volume, which alas I cannot provide here. Running through the volume is a commitment to understanding Plato’s Symposium (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Speech of Greek Philosophy. [REVIEW]Abduljaleel Kadhim Alwali - 2018 - Arab Journal for the Humanities 36:307-318.
    The book Speech of Greek Philosophy is worth reading for a number of reasons, including: It covers history of Greek philosophy from its early days, Thales and his natural school to the Hellenistic age. In addition, the modern world admits, whether in the East or the West, that it owes the Greek mentality the overwhelming majority of its philosophical, literary and artistic products. It is the special belief of European scholars that the Greeks are masters of the modern world in (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Cervantes’s “Republic”: On Representation, Imitation, and Unreason.Rolando Perez - 2021 - eHumanista 47:89-111.
    ABSTRACT This essay deals with the relation between representation, imitation, and the affects in Don Quixote. In so doing, it focuses on Cervantes’s Platonist poetics and his own views of imitation and the books of knighthood. Although most readers, translators, and critics have until now deemed Cervantes’s use of the word “republic” in Don Quixote unimportant, the word “república” or republic is in fact the entry point to Cervantes’ Platonist critique of the novels of knighthood, and his notions of writing, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Speech of Greek Philosophy. [REVIEW]Abduljaleel Alwali - 2018 - Arab Journal for the Humanities 36 (143):307-318.
    The book Speech of Greek Philosophy is worth reading for a number of reasons, including: It covers history of Greek philosophy from its early days, Thales and his natural school to the Hellenistic age. In addition, the modern world admits, whether in the East or the West, that it owes the Greek mentality the overwhelming majority of its philosophical, literary and artistic products. It is the special belief of European scholars that the Greeks are masters of the modern world in (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Greek Philosophy.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2009 - Amman, Jordan: Dar Alwarq Publishing House.
    In this book the author presented the history of the Greek philosophy that extends from the six century BC till the six century AC. He divided the book into three main stages: Philosophy before Socrates: It extended from 6th century BC to mid 5th century BC. This stage began with Thales and his school of Physics; Heraclitus; Pythagoras school; Eleaties School; then Empedocles and Anaxagoras; Democritus and Sophists school. The themes of philosophical contemplation were nature, universe and man. Socratic Method (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Bad Education as the Main Cause of Social Disruption [TRANSLATION].Carlos Carvalhar - manuscript
    This article aims to explore the question of education in Plato from the historical context, thinking the model of Athens, Lesbos and Sparta, and from the perspective where a bad paideía, the low quality in the formation of citizens, becomes the main cause generating social disruption. Then, a reflection was made on the educational possibilities that Athenians from different social classes would have and on the Platonic proposal based on the combination of gymnastics and music, so that a citizen profile (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Living Info: Notes on the Exegesis.Paul Bali - manuscript
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Al encuentro con Platón: los primeros pasos de Gadamer en Marburgo.Facundo Bey - 2020 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 37 (3):457-472.
    This article aims to readdress Hans-Georg Gadamer's first encounter with Plato's philosophy through his earlier academic journey, the direct and indirect influence exerted by his celebrated mentors at the University of Marburg, and his early publications. For this, I will resort not only to his intellectual biography, but also to neglected texts of Gadamer, such as his 1922 doctoral thesis, reviews and articles published between 1924 and 1928, correspondence, both edited and unpublished, philosophical interviews, as well as archive footage. I (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Hope in Ancient Greek Philosophy.G. Scott Gravlee - 2020 - In Historical and Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Hope. Cham: pp. 3-23.
    This chapter aims to illuminate ways in which hope was significant in the philosophy of classical Greece. Although ancient Greek philosophies contain few dedicated and systematic expositions on the nature of hope, they nevertheless include important remarks relating hope to the good life, to reason and deliberation, and to psychological phenomena such as memory, imagination, fear, motivation, and pleasure. After an introductory discussion of Hesiod and Heraclitus, the chapter focuses on Plato and Aristotle. Consideration is given both to Plato’s direct (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Ancient Modes of Philosophical Inquiry.Jens Kristian Larsen & Philipp Steinkrüger - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 1 (23).
    At least since Socrates, philosophy has been understood as the desire for acquiring a special kind of knowledge, namely wisdom, a kind of knowledge that human beings ordinarily do not possess. According to ancient thinkers this desire may result from a variety of causes: wonder or astonishment, the bothersome or even painful realization that one lacks wisdom, or encountering certain hard perplexities or aporiai. As a result of this basic understanding of philosophy, Greek thinkers tended to regard philosophy as an (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Knowledge and Forms in Plato's Educational Philosophy.Mason Marshall - 2020 - Educational Theory 70 (2):215-229.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. O anel de Giges e o Arconte: um estudo do diálogo República, de Platão.Fernando Machado - 2019 - Revista Filogênese – Revista Eletrônica de Pesquisa Na Graduação Em Filosofia da UNESP 12:46-65.
    The purpose of this article is to promote a debate around Plato's work Republic, aiming to situate and establish: 1) the author's arguments in favor of an ideal pólis model; 2) the characteristics of Archon's political making as dominant and effective behavior among the leaders of the pólis government, insurgent against the desire for improper possession (pleonexia) on the part of the men who held the ring of Gyges and were invisible, which would believe, of those who are around him, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. The Problem of Intermediates, an Introduction.Nicholas Baima - 2018 - Plato Journal: The Journal of the International Plato Society 18:41-44.
    Provides a brief introduction to the Problem of Intermediates in Plato and the stances taken toward this issue in this volume of the Plato Journal.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Plato on Pleasures Mixed with Pains: An Asymmetrical Account.Mehmet M. Erginel - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 56:73-122.
    In this paper I aim to show that the restoration model of pleasure as we find it in Plato’s Gorgias, Republic, Timaeus, and Philebus contain a common psychological core, despite the substantial developments and greater sophistication in the later works. I argue that, contrary to the scholarly consensus, all four dialogues take the necessary condition for pain to be a state of imbalance or disharmony rather than a process of destruction or deterioration. Given that the necessary condition for pleasure is (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Socrates' Defensible Devices in Plato's Meno.Mason Marshall - 2019 - Theory and Research in Education 17 (2):165-180.
    Despite how revered Socrates is among many educators nowadays, he can seem in the end to be a poor model for them, particularly because of how often he refutes his interlocutors and poses leading questions. As critics have noted, refuting people can turn them away from inquiry instead of drawing them in, and being too directive with them can squelch independent thought. I contend, though, that Socrates' practices are more defensible than they often look: although there are risks in refuting (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Plato on Knowledge and Truth - Rowett Knowledge and Truth in Plato. Stepping Past the Shadow of Socrates. Pp. XXII + 305. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Cased, £50, Us$65. Isbn: 978-0-19-969365-8. [REVIEW]Naoya Iwata - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-2.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. The Choreography of the Soul: A Psychedelic Philosophy of Consciousness.Ed D'Angelo - manuscript
    This is a 2020 revision of my 1988 dissertation "The Choreography of the Soul" with a new Foreword, a new Conclusion, a substantially revised Preface and Introduction, and many improvements to the body of the work. However, the thesis remains the same. A theory of consciousness and trance states--including psychedelic experience--is developed. Consciousness can be analyzed into two distinct but generally interrelated systems, which I call System X and System Y. System X is the emotional-visceral-kinaesthetic body. System X is a (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Reattaching Shadows: Dancing with Schopenhauer.Joshua Maloy Hall - 2014 - PhaenEx 9 (1):1.
    The structure of my investigation is as follows. I will begin with Schopenhauer’s very brief explicit mention of dance, and then try to understand the exclusion of dance from his extended discussion of the individual arts. Toward this latter end I will then turn to Francis Sparshott essay, which situates Schopenhauer’s thought in terms of Plato’s privileging of dance (in the Laws) as the consummate participatory art, and which observes that Schopenhauer’s dance is that of Shiva, lord of death. In (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. A Unified Interpretation of the Varieties of False Pleasure in Plato's Philebeus.Matthew Strohl - manuscript
    Most commentators think that Plato's account of the varieties of false pleasure is disjointed and that various types of false pleasure he identifies are false in different ways. It really doesn't look that way to me: I think that the discussion is unified, and that Plato starts with less difficult cases to build up to a point about more important but less clear cases. In this paper, I do my best to show how this might work. I don't think I (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. James Warren, “The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists.” Review by Facundo Bey. [REVIEW]Facundo Bey - 2016 - Boletín de Estética 36:71-76.
    The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists se centra en la relación mutua entre las capacidades humanas de sentir placer y dolor y el carácter afectivo que las une con las facultades cognitivas de aprender, comprender, recordar, evocar, planificar y anticiparse. Para esto, Warren consagra toda su agudeza analítica a eminentes obras del pensamiento antiguo: particularmente nos referimos a los diálogos platónicos República, Protágoras y Filebo. Otro tanto hace con De Anima, De Memoria et Reminiscentia, Ética (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Review of Helfer, Socrates and Alcibiades: Plato’s Drama of Political Ambition and Philosophy. [REVIEW]Thornton C. Lockwood - 2018 - International Philosophical Quarterly 58 (1):109-110.
    Although determination, perseverance, and high expectations appear to be laudable characteristics within our society, ambition seems to carry a hint of selfishness or self-promotion (perhaps especially at the cost of others). One can speak of the goals or aims of a team or group, but it seems more characteristic to ascribe ambition to a single individual. Etymologi-cally, ambition derives from the Latin word ambire, which can mean to strive or go around (ambo + ire), but the term also characterizes one (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Sogno e realtà tra India e Grecia.Paolo Magnone - 2009 - In Paolo A. Rossi, Ida Li Vigni & Emanuela Miconi (eds.), Sulle ali del sogno. Mimesis. pp. 103-114.
    [Dream and Reality between India and Greece].
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Bi-Medial Plato, Derrida's Pharmakon.Francesco Tampoia - manuscript
    Only ten years since Derrida’s death, with critical detachment, is it possible to be in touch with him again, to start from the beginning of his philosophizing in company with Plato, and from this vantage point to re-read Dissemination? What really stands between Plato and Derrida? In the first page of Pharmacia Derrida writes: “We will take off here from the Phaedrus ... Only a blind or grossly insensitive reading, could indeed spread the rumour that Plato was simply condemning the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. The Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato's Timaeus.Josh Wilburn - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):627-652.
    in the tripartite psychology of the Republic, Plato characterizes the “spirited” part of the soul as the “ally of reason”: like the auxiliaries of the just city, whose distinctive job is to support the policies and judgments passed down by the rulers, spirit’s distinctive “job” in the soul is to support and defend the practical decisions and commands of the reasoning part. This is to include not only defense against external enemies who might interfere with those commands, but also, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34. Is Appetite Ever 'Persuaded'?: An Alternative Reading of Republic 554c-D.Joshua Wilburn - 2014 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 31 (3).
    Republic 554c-d—where the oligarchic individual is said to restrain his appetites ‘by compulsion and fear’, rather than by persuasion or by taming them with speech—is often cited as evidence that the appetitive part of the soul can be ‘persuaded’. I argue that the passage does not actually support that conclusion. I offer an alternative reading and suggest that appetite, on Plato’s view, is not open to persuasion.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. La paternità dell’eros: il “Simposio” e Freud.Marco Solinas - 2005 - In Gherardo Ugolini (ed.), Die Kraft der Vergangenheit – La forza del passato. Georg Olms Verlag. pp. 231-241.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Unterdrückung, Traum und Unbewusstes in Platons „Politeia“ und bei Freud.Marco Solinas - 2004 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 111 (1):90-112.
    The essay concerns the reconstruction of the repression of desires, with reference to the analysis of their oneiric emersions expounded in the Republic, in comparison with Freud’s conception. Plato’s concept of suppression according to which specific desires are enslaved, so that they can find satisfaction usually only in dreams seems consistent with Freud’s concept of remotion; therefore both the condition of the suppressed desires and the intrapsychic place of their enslavement seem to be interpretable in the light of Freud’s concept (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Lo strabismo dello storico (fra gli antichi e noi). Intervista teorico-biografica. A cura di Marco Solinas.Mario Vegetti & Marco Solinas - 2008 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 21 (3):529-568.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. The Wooden Horse: The Cyrenaics in the Theaetetus.Ugo Zilioli - 2013 - In G. Boys-Stones, C. Gill & D. El-Murr (eds.), The Platonic Art of philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this contribution, I aim to show how locating the Platonic dialogues in the intellectual context of their own time can illuminate their philosophical content. I seek to show, with reference to a specific dialogue (the Theaetetus), how Plato responds to other thinkers of his time, and also to bring out how, by reconstructing Plato’s response, we can gain deeper insight into the way that Plato shapes the structure and form of his argument in the dialogue. In particular, I argue (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Moral Education and the Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato's Laws.Joshua Wilburn - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 45:63.
    In this paper I argue that although the Republic’s tripartite theory of the soul is not explicitly endorsed in Plato’s late work the Laws, it continues to inform the Laws from beneath the surface of the text. In particular, I argue that the spirited part of the soul continues to play a major role in moral education and development in the Laws (as it did in earlier texts, where it is characterized as reason’s psychic ‘ally’). I examine the programs of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40. Akrasia and Self-Rule in Plato's Laws.Joshua Wilburn - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 43:25-53.
    In this paper I challenge the commonly held view that Plato acknowledges and accepts the possibility of akrasia in the Laws. I offer a new interpretation of the image of the divine puppet in Book 1 - the passage often read as an account of akratic action -- and I show that it is not intended as an illustration of akrasia at all. Rather, it provides the moral psychological background for the text by illustrating a broader notion of self-rule as (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41. Empirically Socratic.Nathan Smith - 2013 - Cognizance Journal.
    In the Republic, Socrates argues that morality (justice) is valuable both for itself and for what comes from it. In contemporary moral theory, this view is not widely accepted. However, contemporary empirical research in psychology reveals that what we experience is also what we come to expect. It follows from this that if we act in an immoral fashion, we will expect the same from others. The more often we act immorally, the more suspicion will be ingrained within us. Suspicion (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. The Berkeley Plato. [REVIEW]J. A. Towey - 2010 - Journal of Classics Teaching 3 (21):36.
    Review of Miller's The Berkeley Plato. It is argued that Berkeley University possesses a contemporary portrait of Plato as an aristocrat adorned with the ribbons of athletic victory.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Administrative Lies and Philosopher-Kings.David Simpson - 1996 - Philosophical Inquiry 18 (3-4):45-65.
    The question of whether lies by those who govern are acceptable receives a clear focus and an ideal case in the Republic. Against C. D. C. Reeve, and T. C. Brickhouse and N. D Smith, I argue that the Republic’s apparent recommendation of administrative lies is incoherent. While lies may be a necessary part of the City’s administration, the process and practice of lying undermines that nature which is necessary for any suitable ruler – rendering the ideal impossible. I argue (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Plato as "Architect of Science".Leonid Zhmud - 1998 - Phronesis 43 (3):211-244.
    The figure of the cordial host of the Academy, who invited the most gifted mathematicians and cultivated pure research, whose keen intellect was able if not to solve the particular problem then at least to show the method for its solution: this figure is quite familiar to students of Greek science. But was the Academy as such a center of scientific research, and did Plato really set for mathematicians and astronomers the problems they should study and methods they should use? (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. Plato on Conventionalism.Rachel Barney - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (2):143 - 162.
    A new reading of Plato's account of conventionalism about names in the Cratylus. It argues that Hermogenes' position, according to which a name is whatever anybody 'sets down' as one, does not have the counterintuitive consequences usually claimed. At the same time, Plato's treatment of conventionalism needs to be related to his treatment of formally similar positions in ethics and politics. Plato is committed to standards of objective natural correctness in all such areas, despite the problematic consequences which, as he (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  46. Plato on Knowledge as a Power.Nicholas D. Smith - 2000 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (2):145-168.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  47. The Concept of the Simulacrum: Deleuze and the Overturning of Platonism.Daniel W. Smith - 2005 - Continental Philosophy Review 38 (1-2):89-123.
    This article examines Gilles Deleuze’s concept of the simulacrum, which Deleuze formulated in the context of his reading of Nietzsche’s project of “overturning Platonism.” The essential Platonic distinction, Deleuze argues, is more profound than the speculative distinction between model and copy, original and image. The deeper, practical distinction moves between two kinds of images or eidolon, for which the Platonic Idea is meant to provide a concrete criterion of selection “Copies” or icons (eikones) are well-grounded claimants to the transcendent Idea, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
Plato: Metaphysics
  1. Ancient.Phil Corkum - 2020 - In Michael J. Raven (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Metaphysical Grounding. New York: pp. 20-32.
    Is there grounding in ancient philosophy? To ask a related but different question: is grounding a useful tool for the scholar of ancient philosophy? These questions are difficult, and my goal in this paper is not so much to give definitive answers as to clarify the questions. I hope to direct the student of contemporary metaphysics towards passages where it may be fruitful to look for historical precedent. But I also hope to offer the student of ancient philosophy some guidance (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Theory of Forms: The Construction of Plato and Aristotle’s Criticism.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2002 - Amman, Jordan: Dar Al-Warraq.
    The book "Theory of Forms: The Construction of Plato and Aristotle’s Criticism" focuses on two main aspects, construction and criticism. The constriction of Forms theory is the basis on which Plato built all of his philosophy and which influenced all forms of ideas philosophy that emerged after Plato. The research topic was completed by adding Aristotle's critique of the theory of Forms in order to put a clear picture in front of the reader, which was presented by Plato himself and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. The Philosopher’s Reward: Contemplation and Immortality in Plato’s Dialogues.Suzanne Obdrzalek - forthcoming - In Alex Long (ed.), Immortality in Ancient Philosophy.
    In dialogues ranging from the Symposium to the Timaeus, Plato appears to propose that the philosopher’s grasp of the forms may confer immortality upon him. Whatever can Plato mean in making such a claim? What does he take immortality to consist in, such that it could constitute a reward for philosophical enlightenment? And how is this proposal compatible with Plato’s insistence throughout his corpus that all soul, not just philosophical soul, is immortal? In this chapter, I pursue these questions by (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1285