Plato

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  1. The Art of Division and the Unity of the Idea: Leibniz as Scholar of Plato.Lucia Oliveri - 2022 - In Einhei und Vielheit metaphysischen Denkens. Festschrift für Thomas Leinkauf (65. Geburtstag). Hamburg: pp. 143-160.
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  2. Plato on Education - The Philosopher King.Sfetcu Nicolae -
    Plato's educational model (paidèia) differentiates the level of education according to the students' skills. Thus, a basic education includes, in addition to gymnastics and fighting (the exercise of the body), music (the exercise of the spirit), without being imposed by force because a free man must be free in the conquest of knowledge. If the student has skills, he is educated in mathematics to become a strategist, and in astronomy to raise the soul. From these, the best are selected to (...)
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  3. On the Relation of City and Soul in Plato and Alfarabi.Ishraq Ali & Qin Mingli - 2019 - Journal of Arts and Humanities 8 (2):27-34.
    Abu Nasr Muhammad Alfarabi, the medieval Muslim philosopher and the founder of Islamic Neoplatonism, is best known for his political treatise, Mabadi ara ahl al-madina al- fadhila (Principles of the Opinions of the Inhabitants of the Virtuous City), in which he proposes a theory of utopian virtuous city. Prominent scholars argue for the Platonic nature of Alfarabi’s political philosophy and relate the political treatise to Plato’s Republic. One of the most striking similarities between Alfarabi’s Mabadi ara ahl al-madina al- fadhila (...)
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  4. Plato: The Republic.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    The Republic was written approximately between 380 and 370 BC. The title Republic is derived from Latin, being attributed to Cicero, who called the book De re publica (About public affairs), or even as De republica, thus creating confusion as to its true meaning. The Republic is considered an integral part of the utopian literary genre. The second title, Peri dikaiou (περὶ δικαίου, On Justice), may have been included later. The central theme of the book is justice, argued with the (...)
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  5. Plato on knowledge and truth - (c.) rowett knowledge and truth in Plato. Stepping past the shadow of socrates. Pp. XXII + 305. Oxford: Oxford university press, 2018. Cased, £50, us$65. Isbn: 978-0-19-969365-8. [REVIEW]Naoya Iwata - 2019 - The Classical Review:1-2.
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  6. Plato's Philosophy.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    Plato's philosophy is in line with the pre-Socratics, sophists and artistic traditions that underlie Greek education, in a new framework, defined by dialectics and the theory of Ideas. For Plato, knowledge is an activity of the soul, affected by sensible objects, and by internal processes. Platonism has its origins in Plato's philosophy, although it is not to be confused with it. According to Platonism, there are abstract objects (a notion different from that of modern philosophy that exists in another realm (...)
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  7. Platonism. Contributions of the 43rd International Wittgenstein Symposium.Herbert Hrachovec & Jakub Mácha (eds.) - 2022 - ALWS.
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  8. Ephemeral climates: Plato's geographic myths and the phenomenological nature of climate and its changes.Maximilian Gregor Hepach - 2022 - Journal of Historical Geography (X):1-10.
    Historical and cultural approaches to climate generally consider climate to be a stabilising concept between weather and culture. Different historical and cultural concepts of climate signify different ways of learning to live with the weather. However, anthropogenic climate change evidences the limit of this approach: instead of stabilising, climates ephemeralise together with the ways we have come to adapt to them. Changing climates require a concept of climate that captures how climates are experienced both as stable and ephemeral. To create (...)
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  9. A crítica ética ao realismo estético em Platão.Carlos Carvalhar - 2022 - Revista Dissertatio de Filosofia 1 (56):213-241.
    Defende-se que, em Platão, haveria um ataque ao estilo de arte realista, uma novidade à época. Será apresentada uma definição do que seria esse realismo, apresentando exemplos da arte visual, mas também, brevemente, da poesia. Será destacada a comunhão de áreas filosóficas na crítica platônica, pois não só a estética, como a epistemologia, a ontologia e a ética estão presentes no ideário que define a arte como um simulacro do real. Será abordada a questão da mímēsis e a diferença de (...)
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  10. Plato, The Republic: On Justice – Dialectics and Education.Sfetcu Nicolae - 2022 - Bucharest: MultiMedia Publishing.
    Plato drew on the philosophical work of some of his predecessors, especially Socrates, but also Parmenides, Heraclitus, and Pythagoras, to develop his own philosophy, which explores most important fields, including metaphysics, ethics, aesthetics, and politics. With his professor Socrates and his student Aristotle, he laid the foundations of Western philosophical thought. Plato is considered one of the most important and influential philosophers in human history, being one of the founders of Western religion and spirituality. The philosophy he developed, known as (...)
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  11. The Philosophy of Exemplarity: Singularity, Particularity, and Self-Reference.Mácha Jakub - 2023 - New York: Routledge.
    This book offers an original philosophical perspective on exemplarity. Inspired by Wittgenstein’s later work and Derrida’s theory of deconstruction, it argues that examples are not static entities but rather oscillate between singular and universal moments. There is a broad consensus that exemplary cases mediate between singular instances and universal concepts or norms. In the first part of the book, Mácha contends that there is a kind of différance between singular examples and general exemplars or paradigms. Every example is, in part, (...)
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  12. Response to the Review Symposium on Reading Plato’s Dialogues to Enhance Learning and Inquiry: Exploring Socrates’ Use of Protreptic for Student Engagement.Mason Marshall - 2022 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 41 (6):711-717.
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  13. Plato's Work.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    Plato's entire body of work has survived intact to this day, decisively influencing Western culture. For Plato, dialogue is the only tool capable of highlighting the research character of philosophy, the key element of his thinking. Certainly the written word is more precise and in-depth than the oral one, but the oral discourse allows an immediate exchange of views on the subject under discussion. The main protagonist of the dialogues is Socrates, except for the last dialogues where he is assigned (...)
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  14. Emotion in Plato's Trial of Socrates.Thomas W. Moody - 2022 - Dissertation, City University of New York
    My dissertation argues that Plato composed the figure of Socrates as a three- dimensional literary character who experiences and confronts emotions in ways that other studies have overlooked. By adopting a dramatic, non-dogmatic mode of reading the dialogues and emphasizing the literary elements of the texts and their dramatic connections, this dissertation offers a new and compelling portrait of Socrates in the dialogues that relate his finals weeks of life: Theaetetus, Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo. This study in turn provides (...)
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  15. Plato: Biography.Sfetcu Nicolae -
    The main biographical source about Plato, according to the testimony of the Neoplatonic Simplicius, was written by the disciple Xenocrates, but unfortunately it has not reached us. The earliest biography of Plato to date, De Platone et dogmate eius, is by a second-century Latin author, Apuleius. All of Plato's other biographies were written more than five hundred years after his death. The Greek historian Diogenes (2nd and 3rd centuries) is the author of a series of biographies of Greek philosophers (The (...)
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  16. The Paradox of Falsehood and Non-Being.Simone Nota - 2021 - Synthesis 1 (1):7-46.
    How can we think or say what is not? If we equate what-is-not with nothing, then a thought of nothing is no thought at all; if we don’t, we are condemned to admit that what-is-not is, seemingly incurring in self-refutation. In this paper, I address this paradox through the lenses of Parmenides, Plato, Russell, and the early Wittgenstein.
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  17. Socrates’ Tomb in Antisthenes’ Kyrsas and its Relationship with Plato’s Phaedo.Menahem Luz - 2022 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 1176.
    Socrates’ burial is dismissed as philosophically irrelevant in Phaedo 115c-e although it had previously been discussed by Plato’s older contemporaries. In Antisthenes’ Kyrsas dialogue describes a visit to Socrates’ tomb by a lover of Socrates who receivesprotreptic advice in a dream sequence while sleeping over Socrates’ grave. The dialogue is a metaphysical explanation of how Socrates’ spiritual message was continued after death. Plato underplays this metaphorical imagery by lampooning Antisthenes philosophy and his work and subsequently precludes him from an active (...)
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  18. El inmoralismo de Trasímaco y la pleonexía.Javier Echenique - 2022 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 39 (2):305-315.
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  19. Plato on the weakness of words.Erik Ostenfeld - manuscript
    This is a defence of the authenticity of Plato’s Epistula vii against the recent onslaught by Frede and Burnyeat (2015). It focusses on what Ep. vii has to say about writing and the embedded philosophical Digression and evaluates this in the context of other mainly late dialogues. In the Cratylus, Socrates ends with resignation regarding the potential of language study as a source of truth. This is also the case in Ep. vii, where the four means of knowledge (names, definitions, (...)
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  20. Plato on the Weakness of Words: A defence of the Digression of Ep. vii.Erik Nis Ostemfeld - manuscript
    This is a defence of the authenticity of Plato’s Epistula vii against the recent onslaught by Frede and Burnyeat (2015). It focusses on what Ep. vii has to say about writing and the embedded philosophical Digression and evaluates this in the context of other mainly late dialogues. In the Cratylus, Socrates ends with resignation regarding the potential of language study as a source of truth. This is also the case in Ep. vii, where the four means of knowledge (names, definitions, (...)
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  21. Analytic Approaches to Plato.James Lesher - 2012 - In The Continuum Companion to Plato. London and New York: Continuum International Publishing Group. pp. 292-294.
    In recent years some scholars have sought to apply the techniques of modern analytic philosophy to Plato’s writings. This has involved recasting portions of the dialogues as concisely stated deductive arguments, exploring questions relating to validity as well as to truth, exposing contradictions and equivocations, and making explicit all essential assumptions. The rationale behind this approach, as Gregory Vlastos has explained, is that ‘By means of these techniques we may now better understand some of the problems Plato attempted to solve (...)
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  22. Plato and the Presocratics.James Lesher - 2012 - In The Continuum Companion to Plato. Continuum International Publishing Group. pp. 21-24.
    Plato refers frequently to the views held by the early Greek thinkers we today call ‘the Presocratics’, typically while lining up witnesses for or against a philosophical thesis. His characters speak approvingly of the doctrines of Parmenides and the Pythagoreans but repudiate in the strongest terms the teachings of ‘atheistic materialists’ such as the Milesian inquirers into nature we today regard as the founders of Western philosophy and science. The chief failings of the materialists lay in not acknowledging the priority (...)
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  23. Anselm Feuerbach’s Das Gastmahl des Platon and Plato’s Symposium.James Lesher - 2008 - In Imagines: The reception of antiquity in the performing and visual arts. Logroño: Universidad de La Rioja. pp. 479-490.
    In his monumental work Das Gastmahl des Platon (1869) the artist Anselm Feuerbach depicted the scene in Plato’s Symposium in which a drunken Alcibiades, accompanied by a band of revelers, enters the dining chamber of the house of the poet Agathon. We have reason to attribute three aims to the artist: (1) to recreate a famous scene from ancient Greek literature, making extensive use of recent archaeological discoveries in southern Italy; (2) through the depiction of a senate and dignified Agathon, (...)
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  24. A Course on the Afterlife of Plato’s Symposium.James Lesher - 2004 - Classical Journal 100:75-85.
    A course on the afterlife of Plato’s Symposium can accomplish two worthwhile objectives. It can afford students an opportunity to study a philosophical and literary masterpiece, and it can introduce them to some of the main currents in modern European culture. One recent iteration of such a course addressed six questions: (1) Why might Plato have chosen to write a dialogue about a ‘drinking party’? (2) Why did Plato present multiple speeches on the nature of Eros? (3) Why have some (...)
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  25. The Meaning of Saphêneia in Plato’s Divided Line’.James Lesher - 2010 - In Plato’s Republic: A Critical Guide. Cambridge UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 171-187.
    In Republic VI, Plato’s Socrates attempts to explain the nature of human understanding by means of a simile of a line divided into four unequal segments. Socrates directs Glaucon to accept as names for the four states ‘rational knowledge’ for the highest, ‘understanding’ for the second, ‘belief’ for the third, and for the last, ‘perception of images.’ He then directs Glaucon to arrange the four states in a proportion, ‘considering that they participate in saphēneia in the same degree to which (...)
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  26. Education, Conflict and Harmony in Book 1 of Plato's Laws.Diego Garcia Rincon - 2021 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 2 (15):29-52.
    Book 1 of Plato’s Laws, and particularly the image of the puppet introduced near its end, has been traditionally interpreted as presenting the moral psychology model that underlies the educational system delineated by the Athenian Stranger, which construes virtue as consonance between the non–rational and the rational elements of the soul. But a different and competing conception of virtue looms large in Laws 1, virtue as victory of the best part of the soul in psychic conflict. This paper argues that (...)
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  27. On Justice as Dance.Joshua Hall - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):62-78.
    This article is part of a larger project that explores how to channel people’s passion for popular arts into legal social justice by reconceiving law as a kind of poetry and justice as dance, and exploring different possible relationships between said legal poetry and dancing justice. I begin by rehearsing my previous new conception of social justice as organismic empowerment, and my interpretive method of dancing-with. I then apply this method to the following four “ethico-political choreographies of justice”: the choral (...)
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  28. Seyn, ἕν, 道: Brevis tractatus meta-ontologicus de elephantis et testudinibus.Florian Marion - 2022 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 119 (1):1-51.
    The question of ontological foundation has undergone a noteworthy revival in recent years: metaphysicians today quarrel about how exactly to understand the asymmetrical and hyperintensional relationship of grounding. One of the reasons for this revival is that the old quantificationalist meta-ontology inherited from Quine has been effectively criticised by leading philosophers favourable to a meta-ontology, the aim of which is to come to know “which facts/items ground (constitute the base of) which other facts/items”, thus to examine the relation of ontological (...)
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  29. The Whole-Part Dilemma: A Compositional Understanding of Plato’s Theory of Form.SeongSoo Park - forthcoming - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu.
    In this paper, I suggest a way of resolving the whole-part dilemma suggested in the Parmenides. Specifically, I argue that grabbing the second horn of the dilemma does not pose a significant challenge. To argue for this, I consider two theses about Forms, namely, the oneness and indivisibility theses. More specifically, I argue that the second horn does not violate the oneness thesis if we treat composition as identity and that the indivisibility thesis ought to be reinterpreted given Plato’s later (...)
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  30. Plato’s prescription: The origin myth of media theory.Thomas Sutherland - 2022 - Media Theory 6 (2):203–232.
    Plato’s Phaedrus, perhaps his most enigmatic and structurally convoluted dialogue, could easily be said to inaugurate a pointed critique of mass media that persists to the present day. Indeed, in certain corners of media theory, the origin myth of writing furnished in the Phaedrus (in which the Egyptian god Theuth presents writing as a gift to King Thamus) has in turn come to serve as a kind of origin myth for media theory: a primaeval pharmacopoeia of media effects. And yet, (...)
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  31. Plato on the social role of women: critical reflections.Irina Deretić - 2013 - International Journal Skepsis 1 (XXIII):152-168.
    Plato was the first philosopher who gave an account for the highly controversial claim that both genders are principally equal in respect to their talents and abilities. Consequently, one may advocate the thesis that in Plato’s view, the gender differences are rather the outcomes of social, cultural and political influences, than of natural factors. The aim of this paper is to elucidate the meaning and validity of Plato’s arguments for the gender equality in the Republic, which will be supplemented with (...)
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  32. Plato, fetters round the neck, and the Quran.Victoria Holbrook - 2021 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 4 (XVI):27-45.
    I analyze figures and themes of Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” evident in chapter thirty-six of the Quran. I argue that the two texts share (1) a neck fetter fixing the head; (2) a spatial organization of barriers before and behind and cover- ing above; (3) a theme of failure to see the truth and assault upon those who tell the truth, and (4) a theme of transcendent reality as a context of meaning. I argue that the Quran displays an (...)
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  33. Review of Dimas, Meyer and Lane – Plato's Statesman: A Philosophical Discussion. [REVIEW]Jeremy Reid - 2022 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
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  34. At the Origin of Evil. Amathia and Excessive Philautia in a Passage of Plato Laws.Guido Cusinato - 2021 - Thaumàzein 9 (1):198-232.
    In this paper I focus on a passage of Plato’s Laws that so far has been the object of little study (V 731d-732b). In the Laws, the origin of all evil is neither an ontological principle, as in the Judaeo-Christian tradition, nor a simple lack of knowledge (àghnoia) or a lack of knowledge combined with the false presumption of knowledge (amathìa). Rather, in this passage amathìa itself is traced back to “excessive self-love” (sphòdra heautoû philìa). I show that this “excess” (...)
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  35. New Persepctives on Platonic Dialectic.Jens Kristian Larsen, Vivil Valvik Haraldsen & Justin Vlasits (eds.) - 2022 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    For Plato, philosophy depends on, or is perhaps even identical with, dialectic. Few will dispute this claim, but there is little agreement as to what Platonic dialectic is. According to a now prevailing view it is a method for inquiry the conception of which changed so radically for Plato that it "had a strong tendency ... to mean ‘the ideal method’, whatever that may be" (Richard Robinson). Most studies of Platonic dialectic accordingly focus on only one aspect of this method (...)
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  36. Heraclitean Flux Metaphysics.Andrew Dennis Bassford - forthcoming - Metaphysica: International Journal for Ontology and Metaphysics.
    This essay offers an original interpretation and defense of the doctrine of flux, as it is presented in Plato’s Theaetetus. The methodology of the paper’s analysis is in the style of rational reconstruction, and it is highly analytic in scope, in the sense that I will focus on the text itself, and only on certain parts of it too, while ignoring the rest of Plato’s extensive corpus, and without worrying about whether, how, and to what extent the interpretation of the (...)
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  37. Emancipation or Instrumentalization: Some Remarks on Plato’s Feminism.Aleksandar Kandić - 2021 - In Irina Deretić (ed.), Women in Times of Crisis. Belgrade: Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade. pp. 9-19.
    The paper explores broader socio-historical circumstances which led to the famous Plato’s argument in favor of gender equality in Republic V. The author will critically discuss some of the most relevant interpretations of the argument given by G. Vlastos, J. Annas, A. W. Saxonhouse, and other contemporary philosophers. While some influences of Pythagoreanism or even Spartan practices must be admitted, Plato’s argument appears to be quite original and “revolutionary” for the 4th century B.C. Athens. Of particular importance is to recognize (...)
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  38. Consideration of Hegel, Heidegger and Rangos with Respect to the Deductions in the Parmenides of Plato.Brad Thomson - manuscript
    Analysis of the Deductions in Plato's Parmenides.
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  39. Analysis of Heidegger on Plato's Doctrine of Truth.Brad Thomson - manuscript
    Analysis of Heidegger on Plato's Doctrine of Truth, the Cave Allegory.
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  40. Consideration of Hegel, Heidegger and Rangos with Respect to the Relationships of Deductions in the Parmenides of Plato.Brad Thomson - manuscript
    Analysis of the Deductions in Plato's Parmenides.
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  41. A Reflection on Plato’s Notion of Politics and Nigeria Political Model.Hyginus Ebuka Abonyi - forthcoming - Student Writers Association.
    Philosophy, right from its inception in antiquity, has always been a source of ideas, and inspiration for the transformation of society. In attempt to solve societal problems, philosophers ask critical questions and suggest rational answers to them just like some fundamental theories postulated by great thinkers in the past had been usefully applied to solve contemporary problems. Hence, using analytic method, this work makes vivid through criticism from the light of Plato’s notion on politic, the reason why Nigeria is where (...)
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  42. Unfamiliar Voices: Harmonizing the Non-Socratic Speeches and Plato's Psychology.Jeremy Reid - 2017 - In Pierre Destrée & Zina Giannopolou (eds.), Plato's Symposium: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press. pp. 28–47.
    Commentators have often been puzzled by the structure of the Symposium; in particular, it is unclear what the relationship is between Socrates’ speech and that of the other symposiasts. This chapter seeks to make a contribution to that debate by highlighting parallels between the first four speeches of the Symposium and the goals of the early education in the Republic. In both dialogues, I contend, we see Plato concerned with educating people through (a) activating and cultivating spirited motivations, (b) becoming (...)
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  43. Plato on Love and Sex.Jeremy Reid - 2019 - In Adrienne Martin (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Love in Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 105-115.
    When people now talk about a relationship as being “Platonic”, they mean that the relationship is a non-sexual friendship. But what did Plato himself say about different kinds of relationship, and how did his name come to be associated with non-sexual relationships? While Plato’s Symposium has been the center of attention for his views on love, I argue that the Phaedrus and Laws VIII provide a much clearer account of Plato’s views. In these dialogues, Plato distinguishes between two kinds of (...)
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  44. Once Again From the Beginning: On the Relationship of Skepticism and Philosophy in Hegel's System.Miles Hentrup - 2016 - Dissertation, Stony Brook University
    This dissertation examines the relationship of skepticism and philosophy in the work of G.W.F. Hegel. Whereas other commentators have come to recognize the epistemological significance of Hegel's encounter with skepticism, emphasizing the strength of his system against skeptical challenges to the possibility of knowledge, I argue that Hegel develops his metaphysics in part through his ongoing engagement with the skeptical tradition. As such, I argue that Hegel's interest is not in refuting skepticism, but in defining its legitimate role within the (...)
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  45. Plato's Republic.Irfan Ajvazi - manuscript
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  46. review of A Platonic Theory of Moral Education: Cultivating Virtue in Contemporary Democratic Classrooms (Routledge, 2020) by Mark E. Jonas and Yoshiaki Nakazawa. [REVIEW]Mason Marshall - 2021 - Educational Theory 71 (4):539-545.
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  47. Review of POLITIS, V., Plato’s Essentialism: Reinterpreting the Theory of Forms (Cambridge University Press, 2021). [REVIEW]Keith Begley - 2021 - Classics Ireland 27:304–306.
    In this book, VP builds upon his previous study by shifting focus from the motivation for the ti esti question, to the motivation for the commitment to what is designated by an adequate and true answer to such questions. VP’s aim in this study is to show that what are usually called ‘Forms’ (eidē), rather than being things that have essences, simply are those essences designated by adequate and true answers to ti esti questions. This book is highly recommended for (...)
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  48. Review of POLITIS, V., The Structure of Enquiry in Plato's Early Dialogues (Cambridge University Press, 2015). [REVIEW]Keith Begley - 2021 - Classics Ireland 27:301–303.
    This book has been ably reviewed by others. I am taking a second look at it now on the occasion of the publication of its sequel, a review of which I also provide in this volume. I have had the distinct pleasure of being a student and colleague of Vasilis Politis (VP) since the initiation of the project that led to these monographs, and the great privilege of witnessing the development of the project for more than a decade. VP’s Plato (...)
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  49. Plato and the Tripartition of Soul.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2018 - In John E. Sisko (ed.), Philosophy of Mind in Antiquity: History of Philosophy of Mind, Volume 1. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. pp. 101-119.
    In the Republic, Phaedrus, and Timaeus, Socrates holds that the psyche is complex, or has three distinct and semi-autonomous sources of motivation, which he calls the reasoning, spirited, and appetitive parts. While the rational part determines what is best overall and motivates us to pursue it, the spirited and appetitive parts incline us toward different objectives, such as victory, honor, and esteem, or the satisfaction of our desires for food, drink, and sex. While it is obvious that Socrates primarily characterizes (...)
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  50. The ontological import of Parmenides' metaphor: a reading of the proemium.Yannis Chatzantonis - manuscript
    The aim of this essay is to consider the nature of the philosophical task and of the conditions of its possibility according to Parmenides and Plato. With these thinkers, the task of the philosopher necessitates a propaedeutic activity that makes the doing of philosophy possible; that is, both Parmenides and Plato identify the need for a philosophical education that would alleviate the obstacles that would make philosophy impossible to practise, ensuring and accounting for the possibility of philosophical practice. The impossibility (...)
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