Related

Contents
10 found
Order:
  1. One sex or two? Kathleen Stock on Thomas Laqueur.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    I argue that Kathleen Stock omits crucial information in her 2021 book Material Girls, when she debates with Thomas Laqueur, information which enables readers to appreciate the excitement in relation to his historical discovery. I argue further that this is more than just a communicational problem. I then present a reason for rejecting the theory Laqueur uncovers: the initially strange theory that there is just one sex. But I argue that the one sex theory is unlikely to be killed off (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Reading trouble? On a rejected alternative to Kathleen Stock’s immersion-in-a-fiction explanation.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This paper responds to Kathleen Stock’s attempt to explain a puzzling fact, at least from her standpoint: widespread assertions that some people who are biologically male are women and some people who are biologically female are men. She regards these assertions as made while immersed in a fiction. Stock rejects an alternative explanation – that a lot of these people have read Judith Butler or 1970s feminism. Clarifying that explanation reveals it to be not so easy to dismiss.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. (Re)Reading Monique Wittig: Domination, Utopia, and Polysemy.J. A. Szymanski - 2023 - Hypatia 38 (3):549-571.
    This article offers a rereading of Monique Wittig's philosophical writing on sex, gender, and sexuality against some of the major criticisms that have led to limited engagement with her work. I argue that reorienting our understanding of Wittig's lesbian-feminism away from notions of sexuality per se enables us to read her in terms of a larger project that takes aim at the primacy of phallocentrism in how we understand subjectivity. In doing so, I establish and situate three themes in her (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Monsters of Sex: Foucault and the Problem of Life.Sarah K. Hansen - 2018 - Foucault Studies 24 (2):102-124.
    This article argues, contra-Derrida, that Foucault does not essentialize or precomprehend the meaning of life or bio- in his writings on biopolitics. Instead, Foucault problematizes life and provokes genealogical questions about the meaning of modernity more broadly. In The Order of Things, the 1974-75 lecture course at the Collège de France, and Herculine Barbin, the monster is an important figure of the uncertain shape of modernity and its entangled problems (life, sex, madness, criminality, etc). Engaging Foucault’s monsters, I show that (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. Sex and Horror.Steve Jones - 2018 - In Feona Attwood, Clarissa Smith & Brian McNair (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Media, Sex and Sexuality. New York: Routledge. pp. 290-299.
    The combination of sex and horror may be disquieting to many, but the two are natural (if perhaps gruesome) bedfellows. In fact, sex and horror coincide with such regularity in contemporary horror fiction that the two concepts appear to be at least partially intertwined. The sex–horror relationship is sometimes connotative rather than overt; examples of this relationship range from the seduction overtones of 'Nosferatu' and the juxtaposition of nudity and horror promised by European exploitation filmmakers to the sadomasochistic iconography of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Modelling Sex/Gender.Helen L. Daly - 2017 - Think 16 (46):79-92.
    People often assume that everyone can be divided by sex/gender (that is, by physical and social characteristics having to do with maleness and femaleness) into two tidy categories: male and female. Careful thought, however, leads us to reject that simple ‘binary’ picture, since not all people fall precisely into one group or the other. But if we do not think of sex/gender in terms of those two categories, how else might we think of it? Here I consider four distinct models; (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Theorizing with a purpose: The many kinds of sex.Sally Haslanger - 2016 - In Catherine Kendig (ed.), Natural Kinds and Classification in Scientific Practice. London: Routledge. pp. 129-144.
    The paper indicates how social kinds may be internally and objectively unified in a way continuous with physical kinds. It argues that the practice of theorizing is continuous with other practices to the extent that theorists, like anyone engaged in a practice, needs to make choices that are responsive to purposes (and corresponding values) guiding the practice. The paper discusses Epstein's theory of anchoring, and argues for a theory of scaffolding social kinds.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8. Changing Race, Changing Sex: The Ethics of Self-Transformation.Cressida J. Heyes - 2006 - Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (2):266-282.
    "Why are there 'transsexuals' but not 'transracials'?" "Why is there an accepted way to change sex, but not to change race?" I have repeatedly heard these questions from theorists puzzled by the phenomenon of transsexuality. Feminist thinkers, in particular, often seem taken aback that in the case of category switching the possibilities appear to be so different. Behind the question is sometimes an implicit concern: Does not the (hypothetical or real) example of individual “transracialism” seem politically troubling? And, if it (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  9. Resisting sex/gender conflation: a rejoinder to John Hood-Williams.Robert Archer - 1996 - The Sociological Review 44 (4):728-745.
    The irony of the rejection of the sex/gender distinction is that it renders sociology per se an impossible enterprise. For it is my submission that, contra Hood-Williams (1996) and others, the biological and the social constitute distinct, irreducible levels of reality: to conflate (in a ‘downwards’ or ‘upwards’ direction) the two levels is immediately to render analysis of their relative interplay at best intractable. It is indeed arguable that Hood-Williams is not so much concerned with (rightly) rejecting the so-called ‘additive’ (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Trans-rights debates, social construction of the “sextions,” and analytic philosophy.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This is a one-page handout which responds to Kathleen Stock's 2021 book Material Girls. It considers how analytic philosophy can be introduced into this area, and specifies five kinds of argument for the claim that the sexes are socially constructed.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark