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  1. Worldly and Otherworldly Virtue: Likeness to God as Educational Ideal in Plato, Plotinus, and Today.Marie-Élise Zovko - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):586-596.
    In Plato, ‘Becoming like God’ constitutes the telos of the philosophical life. Our ‘likeness to God’ is rooted in the relationship of the divine paradeigma to its image established in the generation of the Cosmos. This relationship makes knowledge and virtue possible, and informs Plato’s theory of education. Related concepts preexist in Judeo-Christian and other traditions and continue to inform our thought on moral and ethical issues, particularly as regards our understanding of what it means to be human. From the (...)
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  • Measuring Humans Against Gods: On the Digression of Plato’s Theaetetus.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2019 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 101 (1):1-29.
    The digression of Plato’s Theaetetus (172c2–177c2) is as celebrated as it is controversial. A particularly knotty question has been what status we should ascribe to the ideal of philosophy it presents, an ideal centered on the conception that true virtue consists in assimilating oneself as much as possible to god. For the ideal may seem difficult to reconcile with a Socratic conception of philosophy, and several scholars have accordingly suggested that it should be read as ironic and directed only at (...)
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  • Plato on Divinization and the Divinity of the Rational Part of the Soul.Justin Keena - 2021 - Plato Journal 21:87-95.
    Three distinct reasons that Plato calls the rational part of the soul “divine” are analyzed: its metaphysical kinship with the Forms, its epistemological ability to know the Forms, and its ethical capacity to live by them. Supposing these three divine aspects of the rational part are unified in the life of each person, they naturally suggest a process of divinization or “becoming like god” according to which a person, by living more virtuously, which requires increasingly better knowledge of the Forms, (...)
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  • Al-Kindī’s Treatise on Definitions and its Place in History of Philosophy.Tomasz Stefaniuk - 2017 - Idea. Studia Nad Strukturą I Rozwojem Pojęć Filozoficznych 29 (1):317-338.
    The paper focuses on al-Kindī’s Treatise on definitions - the oldest surviving Arabic glossary of philosophical and scientific terms. Its author presents more than one definition of the term falsafa. Does this mean that he was not sure how to explain to his coreligionists what philosophy really is? In this article I aim to focus on the content of all six definitions of philosophy presented in the treatise. I also compare some of al-Kindī’s definitions of philosophy with the way in (...)
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  • Plato’s Bond of Love : Erôs as Participation in Beauty.Lauren Patricia Wenden Hosty Ware - unknown
    In his dialogues, Plato presents different ways in which to understand the relation between Forms and particulars. In the Symposium, we are presented with yet another, hitherto unidentified Form-particular relation: the relation is Love, which binds together Form and particular in a generative manner, fulfilling all the metaphysical requirements of the individual’s qualification by participation. Love in relation to the beautiful motivates human action to desire for knowledge of the Form, resulting in the lover actively cultivating and bringing into being (...)
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  • Imitation in Faith: Enacting Paul’s Ambiguous Pistis Christou Formulations on a Greco-Roman Stage.Suzan J. M. Sierksma-Agteres - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 77 (3):119-153.
    ABSTRACTThere is an ongoing debate in New Testament scholarship on the correct interpretation of Paul’s pistis Christou formulations: are we justified by our own faith/trust in Christ, or by participating in Christ’s faith and faithfulness towards God? This article contributes to the position of purposeful or sustained ambiguity by reading Paul’s imitation – and faith – language against the background of Hellenistic-Roman thought on and practice of imitation. In particular, the mimetic chain between teachers and students training for a philosophical (...)
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  • Seneca on Surpassing God.Scott Aikin - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (1):22-31.
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  • Aristotle’s Harmony with Plato on Separable and Immortal Soul.W. M. Coombs - 2017 - South African Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):541-552.
    The possibility of a harmony between the psychological doctrine of Aristotle and that of Plato marks a significant issue within the context of the debate surrounding Aristotle’s putative opposition to or harmony with Plato’s philosophy. The standard interpretation of Aristotle’s conception of the soul being purely hylomorphic leaves no room for harmonisation with Plato, nor does a functionalist interpretation that reduces Aristotle’s psychological doctrine to physicalist terms. However, these interpretations have serious drawbacks, both in terms of ad-hoc explanations formulated in (...)
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