Switch to: References

Citations of:

Autonomy, Vulnerability, Recognition, and Justice

In John Christman & Joel Anderson (eds.), Autonomy and the Challenges to Liberalism: New Essays. New York: pp. 127-149 (2005)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Holding Responsible and Taking Responsibility.Stephen Bero - 2020 - Law and Philosophy 39 (3):263-296.
    In matters of responsibility, there are often two sides to the transaction: one party who holds another responsible, and the other who takes responsibility for her conduct. The first side has been closely scrutinized in discussions of the nature of responsibility, due to the influential Strawsonian conjecture that an agent is responsible if and only if it is appropriate to hold her responsible. This preoccupation with holding responsible – with its focus on the second-personal perspective and on responses like blame (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • On the Cutting Edge: Ethical Responsiveness to Cesarean Rates.Sylvia Burrow - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (7):44-52.
    Cesarean delivery rates have been steadily increasing worldwide. In response, many countries have introduced target goals to reduce rates. But a focus on target goals fails to address practices embedded in standards of care that encourage, rather than discourage, cesarean sections. Obstetrical standards of care normalize use of technology, creating an imperative to use technology during labor and birth. A technological imperative is implicated in rising cesarean rates if physicians or patients fear refusing use of technology. Reproductive autonomy is at (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • The Harm Principle and Recognition Theory: On the Complementarity Between Linklater, Honneth and the Project of Emancipation.Shannon Brincat - 2013 - Critical Horizons 14 (2):225--256.
    This paper explores potential points of synthesis between two leading theorists in Critical Theory and Critical International Relations Theory, Axel Honneth and Andrew Linklater. Whereas Linklater's recent work on the harm principle has turned away from the critical social theory of the Frankfurt School in favour of Norbert Elias and process sociology, the paper observes a fundamental complementarity between harm and the precepts of recognition theory that can bridge these otherwise disparate approaches to emancipation. The paper begins with a brief (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Suffering and Dying Well: On the Proper Aim of Palliative Care.Govert den Hartogh - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (3):413-424.
    In recent years a large empirical literature has appeared on suffering at the end of life. In this literature it is recognized that suffering has existential and social dimensions in addition to physical and psychological ones. The non-physical aspects of suffering, however, are still understood as pathological symptoms, to be reduced by therapeutical interventions as much as possible. But suffering itself and the negative emotional states it consists of are intentional states of mind which, as such, make cognitive claims: they (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Social Freedom and Progress in the Family: Reflections on Care, Gender and Inequality.Lois McNay - 2015 - Critical Horizons 16 (2):170-186.
    The paper focuses on the discussion of social freedom in the family in Axel Honneth's most recent book Freedom's Right. I argue, on the one hand, that radical democrats have much to learn from Honneth's method of normative reconstruction because it provides a much needed corrective to the “social weightlessness” that characterizes their thought about democracy. In contrast to the current preoccupation with rarefied issues of political ontology, Freedom's Right exemplifies a type of sociologically attuned thinking that is essential for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Ageism and Autonomy in Health Care: Explorations Through a Relational Lens.Laura Pritchard-Jones - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (1):72-89.
    Ageism within the context of care has attracted increasing attention in recent years. Similarly, autonomy has developed into a prominent concept within health care law and ethics. This paper explores the way that ageism, understood as a set of negative attitudes about old age or older people, may impact on an older person’s ability to make maximally autonomous decisions within health care. In particular, by appealing to feminist constructions of autonomy as relational, I will argue that the key to establishing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Vulnerability, Health Care, and Need.Vida Panitch & L. Chad Horne - 2017 - In Christine Straehle (ed.), Vulnerability, Autonomy, and Applied Ethics. New York, NY, USA: pp. 101-120.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Could Robots Strengthen the Sense of Autonomy of Older People Residing in Assisted Living Facilities?—A Future-Oriented Study.Jari Pirhonen, Helinä Melkas, Arto Laitinen & Satu Pekkarinen - 2020 - Ethics and Information Technology 22 (2):151-162.
    There is an urge to introduce high technology and robotics in care settings. Assisted living is the fastest growing form of older adults’ long-term care. Resident autonomy has become the watchword for good care. This article sheds light on the potential effects of care robotics on the sense of autonomy of older people in AL. Three aspects of the residents’ sense of autonomy are of particular interest: interaction-based sense of autonomy, coping-based sense of autonomy, and potential-based sense of autonomy. Ethnographical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Just Above the Fray - Interpretive Social Criticism and the Ends of Social Justice.Andrew Gibson - 2008 - Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):102-118.
    The article lays down the broad strokes of an interpretive approach to social criticism. In developing this approach, the author stresses the importance of both a pluralistic notion of social justice and a rich ideal of personal growth. While objecting to one-dimensional conceptions of social justice centering on legal equality, the author develops the idea of there being multiple "spheres of justice", including the spheres of "care" and "merit". Each of these spheres, he argues, is subject to historical interpretation. He (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Vulnerability, Rights, and Social Deprivation in Temporary Labour Migration.Christine Straehle - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (2):297-312.
    Much of the debate around temporary foreign worker programs in recent years has focused on full or partial access to rights, and, in particular, on the extent to which liberal democratic states may be justified in restricting rights of membership to those who come and work on their territory. Many accounts of the situation of temporary foreign workers assume that a full set of rights will remedy moral inequities that they suffer in their new homes. I aim to show two (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • An Agency‐Based Capability Theory of Justice.Rutger Claassen - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1279-1304.
    The capability approach is one of the main contenders in the field of theorizing social justice. Each citizen is entitled to a set of basic capabilities. But which are these? Martha Nussbaum formulated a set of ten central capabilities. Amartya Sen argued they should be selected in a process of public reasoning. Critics object that the Nussbaum-approach is too perfectionist and the Sen-approach is too proceduralist. This paper presents a third alternative: a substantive but non-perfectionist capability theory of justice. It (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Autonomy, Rationality, and Contemporary Bioethics.Jonathan Pugh - 2020 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Personal autonomy is often lauded as a key value in contemporary Western bioethics. Though the claim that there is an important relationship between autonomy and rationality is often treated as uncontroversial in this sphere, there is also considerable disagreement about how we should cash out the relationship. In particular, it is unclear whether a rationalist view of autonomy can be compatible with legal judgments that enshrine a patient's right to refuse medical treatment, regardless of whether the reasons underpinning the choice (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Reproductive Autonomy and Reproductive Technology.Sylvia Burrow - 2012 - Techne 16 (1):31-45.
    This paper presents a relational account of autonomy showing that a technological imperative impedes autonomy through undermining women’s capacity to resist use of technology in the context of labor and birth. A technological imperative encourages dependence on technology for reassurance whenever possible through creating a (i) separation of maternal and fetal interests; and (ii) perceived need to use technology whenever possible. In response I offer an account of how women might promote autonomy through cultivating self-trust and self-confidence. Autonomy is not (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Relational Autonomy and the Ethics of Health Promotion.A. Wardrope - 2015 - Public Health Ethics 8 (1):50-62.
    Recent articles published in this journal have highlighted the shortcomings of individualistic approaches to health promotion, and the potential contributions of relational analyses of autonomy to public health ethics. I argue that the latter helps to elucidate the former, by showing that an inadequate analysis of autonomy leads to misassignment of both forward-looking and backward-looking responsibility for health outcomes. Health promotion programmes predicated on such inadequate analyses are then ineffective, because they assign responsibility to agents whose social environment inhibits their (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Kant's Conception of Personal Autonomy.Paul Formosa - 2013 - Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (3):193-212.
    A strong distinction is often made between personal autonomy and moral autonomy. Personal autonomy involves governing yourself in the pursuit of your own conception of the good. Moral autonomy involves legislating the moral law for yourself. Viewed in this way personal autonomy seems at best marginal and at worst a positive hindrance to moral autonomy, since personal autonomy can conflict with moral autonomy. Given that Kantian approaches to morality are closely aligned with moral autonomy, does that mean that the Kantian (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Role of Vulnerability in Kantian Ethics.Paul Formosa - 2014 - In Catriona Mackenzie, Wendy Rogers & Susan Dodds (eds.), Vulnerability: New Essays in Ethics and Feminist Philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 88-109.
    Does the fact that humans are vulnerable, needy and dependent beings play an important role in Kantian ethics? It is sometimes claimed that it cannot and does not. I argue that it can and does. I distinguish between broad (all persons are vulnerable) and narrow (only some persons are vulnerable) senses of vulnerability, and explain the role of vulnerability in both senses in Kantian ethics. The basis of this argument is to show that the core normative focus of Kantian ethics (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Social Dimension of Autonomy.Antti Kauppinen - 2011 - In Danielle Petherbridge (ed.), Axel Honneth: Critical Essays. Leiden: Brill. pp. 255-302.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Is There a Right to Surrogacy?Christine Straehle - 2015 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (3):n/a-n/a.
    Access to surrogacy is often cast in the language of rights. Here, I examine what form such a right could take. I distinguish between surrogacy as a right to assisted procreation, and surrogacy as a contractual right. I find the first interpretation implausible: it would give rise to claims against the state that no state can fulfil, namely the provision of sufficient surrogates to satisfy the need. Instead, I argue that the right to surrogacy can only be plausibly understood as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Autonomy, Trust, and Respect.Thomas Nys - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (1):10-24.
    This article seeks to explore and analyze the relationship between autonomy and trust, and to show how these findings could be relevant to medical ethics. First, I will argue that the way in which so-called “relational autonomy theories” tie the notions of autonomy and trust together is not entirely satisfying Then, I will introduce the so-called Encapsulated Interest Account as developed by Russell Hardin. This will bring out the importance of the reasons for trust. What good reasons do we have (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Broader Contexts of Non-Domination: Pettit and Hegel on Freedom and Recognition.Arto Laitinen - 2015 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 18 (4):390-406.
    This study compares Philip Pettit’s account of freedom to Hegelian accounts. Both share the key insight that characterizes the tradition of republicanism from the Ancients to Rousseau: to be subordinated to the will of particular others is to be unfree. They both also hold that relations to others, relations of recognition, are in various ways directly constitutive of freedom, and in different ways enabling conditions of freedom. The republican ideal of non-domination can thus be fruitfully understood in light of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Spectrum of Relational Autonomy, Illustrated Using the Case Studies of Female Suicide Bombers.Herjeet Marway - unknown
    When women become perpetrators of suicide bombing, their agency – their ability to act upon and affect the world – is often denied. There are a number of reasons for this and one this thesis considers is that – as females – they are not expected to be violent. Accordingly, such women are judged to be coerced or incompetent, and so unable to rule themselves sufficiently as agents. Models of autonomy propose various frameworks for assessing whether acts or persons are (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What We Have yet Failed to Achieve: A Study of Charles Taylor's Canadian Social Criticism.Andrew John Gibson - unknown
    This dissertation examines what the author calls the Canadian social criticism component of the work of philosopher Charles Taylor. An internationally renowned scholar, Taylor's work has been much commented on. Yet there is an imbalance of attention in the reception of his work between the ample commentary pertaining to his more abstract philosophical thought, on the one hand, and the paucity of commentary concerning those aspects of his writing that carry more immediate practical relevance, i.e. his work in social criticism. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rethinking Misrecognition and Struggles for Recognition: Critical Theory Beyond Honneth.Giles Douglas - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Essex
    This thesis critically analyzes Axel Honneth’s theories of misrecognition and struggles for recognition and argues for two main conceptualizations to address shortcomings in his theories. The first conceptualization is that recognition and misrecognition behaviors are better understood along three dimensions of engagement—norms, individuals, and actions. We can use this multidimensional view to identify misrecognitions in which the problems are in vertical recognition, either disengagement from norms or engagement with problematic norms, and misrecognitions in which the problems are in horizontal recognition, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Dignity, Esteem, and Social Contribution: A Recognition-Theoretical View.Timo Jütten - 2017 - Journal of Political Philosophy 25 (3):259-280.
    This paper develops a recognition-theoretical analysis of human dignity. I argue that a life with dignity requires social esteem (recognition for one’s contribution to socially shared goals) as well as respect (recognition of one’s equal status). I illustrate this through an empirically informed discussion of three aspects of the current social organization of labour which threaten human dignity: unemployment, precarity and low pay. I also argue that in class societies the assertion of dignity as a positional good can undermine its (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Agency in Social Context.John Lawless - 2017 - Res Philosophica 94 (4):471-498.
    Many political philosophers argue that interference threatens a person’s agency. And they cast political freedom in opposition to interpersonal threats to agency, as non-interference. I argue that this approach relies on an inapt model of agency, crucial aspects of which emerge from our relationships with other people. Such relationships involve complex patterns of vulnerability and subjection, essential to our constitution as particular kinds of agents: as owners of property, as members of families, and as participants in a market for labor. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Constitutive elements of a critical theory of justice.Gustavo Pereira - 2014 - Ideas Y Valores 63 (156):53-78.
    Se presenta una versión de la teoría crítica de la justicia que se estructura en el programa de fundamentación de la ética del discurso, tomando el principio de responsabilidad, introducido por K. O. Apel, como guía normativa para la intervención en las sociedades reales. Esta guía que se especifica en la condición de sujetos de diálogo, permite identificar y desarrollar los elementos constitutivos de la teoría. Las capacidades, como métrica de justicia, y un principio suficientarista, que trabaja conjuntamente con el (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reconsidering Relational Autonomy. Personal Autonomy for Socially Embedded and Temporally Extended Selves.Holger Baumann - 2008 - Analyse & Kritik 30 (2):445-468.
    Most recent accounts of personal autonomy acknowledge that the social environment a person lives in, and the personal relationships she entertains, have some impact on her autonomy. Two kinds of conceptualizing social conditions are traditionally distinguished in this regard: Causally relational accounts hold that certain relationships and social environments play a causal role for the development and ongoing exercise of autonomy. Constitutively relational accounts, by contrast, claim that autonomy is at least partly constituted by a person’s social environment or standing. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Love and Justice: A Paradox?Anca Gheaus - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (6):739-759.
    Three claims about love and justice cannot be simultaneously true and therefore entail a paradox: (1) Love is a matter of justice. (2) There cannot be a duty to love. (3) All matters of justice are matters of duty. The first claim is more controversial. To defend it, I show why the extent to which we enjoy the good of love is relevant to distributive justice. To defend (2) I explain the empirical, conceptual and axiological arguments in its favour. Although (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Relational Account of Intellectual Autonomy.Benjamin Elzinga - 2019 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 49 (1):22-47.
    According to relational views of autonomy, some social relations or forms of dependence are necessary for autonomous agency. Recent relational theorists have primarily focused on autonomy of action or practical autonomy, and the result has been a shift away from individualistic conceptions of autonomy in the practical realm. Despite these trends, individualistic conceptions are still the default when it comes to autonomy of belief or intellectual autonomy. In this paper, I argue for a relational account of intellectual autonomy. Specifically, I (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • All of Us Are Vulnerable, But Some Are More Vulnerable Than Others: The Political Ambiguity of Vulnerability Studies, an Ambivalent Critique.Alyson Cole - 2016 - Critical Horizons 17 (2):260-277.
    This paper raises several concerns about vulnerability as an alternative language to conceptualize injustice and politicize its attendant injuries. First, the project of resignifying “vulnerability” by emphasizing its universality and amplifying its generative capacity, I suggest, might dilute perceptions of inequality and muddle important distinctions among specific vulnerabilities, as well as differences between those who are injurable and those who are already injured. Vulnerability scholars, moreover, have yet to elaborate the path from acknowledging constitutive vulnerability to addressing concrete injustices. Second, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Are Liberal Perfectionism and Neutrality Mutually Exclusive?Eldar Sarajlic - 2015 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):515-537.
    In this paper, I question the view that liberal perfectionism and neutrality are mutually exclusive doctrines. I do so by criticizing two claims made by Jonathan Quong. First, I object to his claim that comprehensive anti-perfectionism is incoherent. Second, I criticize his claim that liberal perfectionism cannot avoid a paternalist stance. I argue that Quong’s substantive assumptions about personal autonomy undermine both of his arguments. I use the discussion of Quong to argue that the standard assumption in liberal theory about (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Recognition and Redistribution: Rethinking N. Fraser's Dualistic Model.Christian Lazzeri - 2009 - Critical Horizons 10 (3):307-340.
    It can be argued that Nancy Fraser's work integrates the concepts of recognition and redistribution by questioning the definition of the concept of recognition in order to bring it closer to the practical scope of redistribution. One of the difficulties raised by the concept of recognition is that it can appear as a kind of social monism by presenting culture as the main factor behind all social criticism, and thus, behind all kinds of claims and conflicts. However, it is possible (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Violence and Silencing: A Philosophical Investigation of Apartheid.Jacqui Poltera - 2011 - Critical Horizons 12 (2):232-250.
    With reference to examples of violence during Apartheid, I argue that the socio-political contexts in which violence occurs significantly shape agents ideas about and responses to violence. As such, philosophers can only make sense of why perpetrators and bystanders alike may have judged violent acts morally justifiable or failed to challenge instances of violence against the backdrop of the particular characteristics of the socio-political context in which it occurs.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Recognition as Redistribution: Rawls, Humiliation and Cultural Injustice.Renante D. Pilapil - 2014 - Critical Horizons 15 (3):284-305.
    This paper aims to explore and examine the implied commitment to the premises of recognition in Rawls’s account of redistributive justice. It attempts to find out whether or not recognition relations that produce humiliation and cultural injustice can be followed to their logical conclusion in his theory of redistribution. This paper makes two claims. Firstly, although Rawls does not disregard the harms of misrecognition as demonstrated in his notion of self-respect being the most important primary good, he cannot liberally accommodate (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Do We Need to Be Part of Dialogue? From Discursive Ethics to Critical Social Justice.Gustavo Pereira - 2015 - Critical Horizons 16 (3):280-298.
    The main goal of critical social justice is to ensure the agency of citizens, which enables them to take part, not only in public discussions about how resources are distributed, but also about matters such as what should be produced, how to do it and through what kind of production, among others. Critical social justice can be best formulated within the foundation programme of discursive ethics, in particular within Apel's version specified in his principle of co-responsibility. This principle establishes a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Recognition Theory and Global Poverty.Gottfried Schweiger - 2014 - Journal of Global Ethics 10 (3):267-273.
    So far, recognition theory has focused its attention on modern capitalism and its formation in richer Western societies and has neglected issues of global poverty. A brief sketch of Axel Honneth's recognition theory precedes an examination of how the theory can contribute to a better understanding of global poverty, and justice in relation to poverty. I wish to highlight five ways in which recognition theory can enrich our inventory of theories dealing with global poverty and justice: It emphasizes the importance (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Narrative Integration, Fragmented Selves, and Autonomy.Catriona Mackenzie & Jacqui Poltera - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (1):31 - 54.
    In this paper we defend the notion of narrative identity against Galen Strawson's recent critique. With reference to Elyn Saks's memoir of her schizophrenia, we question the coherence ofStrawsons conception of the Episodic self and show why the capacity for narrative integration is important for a flourishing life. We aho argue that Scú put pressure on narrative theories that specify unduly restncúve constraints on self-constituting narratives, and chrify the need to distinguish identity from autonomy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Más allá del liberalismo: el enfoque de las capacidades y la justicia social crítica.Gustavo Pereira - 2016 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 51:83-112.
    El enfoque de las capacidades ha estado principalmente asociado al liberalismo, ya que sus figuras fundacionales, Sen y Nussbaum, se han declarado explícitamente parte de esa corriente de pensamiento. Sin embargo, puede afirmarse que algunas de las características de dicho enfoque podrían encontrar su mejor formulación, proyección y desarrollo fuera del liberalismo. A partir de sus conceptos constitutivos de reconocimiento, intersubjetividad y alta sensibilidad a la vulnerabilidad, la justicia social crítica se presenta como un espacio normativo más apropiado para el (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Honneth, Butler and the Ambivalent Effects of Recognition.Paddy McQueen - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (1):43-60.
    This paper explores the ambivalent effects of recognition through a critical examination of Axel Honneth’s theory of recognition. I argue that his underlying perfectionist account and his focus on the psychic effects of recognition lead him to overlook important connections between recognition and power. These claims are substantiated through Butler’s theory of gender performativity and recognition; and issues connected to the socio-institutional recognition of transgender identities. I conclude by suggesting that certain problems with Butler’s own position can corrected by drawing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Every Vote Counts: Equality, Autonomy, and the Moral Value of Democratic Decision-Making.Daniel Jacob - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (1):61-75.
    What is the moral value of formal democratic decision-making? Egalitarian accounts of democracy provide a powerful answer to this question. They present formal democratic procedures as a way for a society of equals to arrive at collective decisions in a transparent and mutually acceptable manner. More specifically, such procedures ensure and publicly affirm that all members of a political community, in their capacity as autonomous actors, are treated as equals who are able and have a right to participate in collective (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Relational Autonomy and the Social Dynamics of Paternalism.John Christman - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):369-382.
    In this paper I look at various ways that interpersonal and social relations can be seen as required for autonomy. I then consider cases where those dynamics might play out or not in potentially paternalistic situations. In particular, I consider cases of especially vulnerable persons who are attempting to reconstruct a sense of practical identity required for their autonomy and need the potential paternalist’s aid in doing so. I then draw out the implications for standard liberal principles of paternalism, specifically (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Personal Autonomy, Social Identity, and Oppressive Social Contexts.Rebekah Johnston - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (2):312-328.
    Attempts to articulate the ways in which membership in socially subordinated social identities can impede one's autonomy have largely unfolded as part of the debate between different types of internalist theories in relation to the problem of internalized oppression. The different internalist positions, however, employ a damage model for understanding the role of social subordination in limiting autonomy. I argue that we need an externalist condition in order to capture the ways in which membership in a socially subordinated identity can (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Mafioso Case: Autonomy and Self-Respect.Carla Bagnoli - 2009 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (5):477-493.
    This article argues that immoralists do not fully enjoy autonomous agency because they are not capable of engaging in the proper form of practical reflection, which requires relating to others as having equal standing. An adequate diagnosis of the immoralist’s failure of agential authority requires a relational account of reflexivity and autonomy. This account has the distinctive merit of identifying the cost of disregarding moral obligations and of showing how immoralists may become susceptible to practical reason. The compelling quality of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Context-Variable Self and Autonomy: Exploring Surveillance Experience, Recognition, and Action at Airport Security Checkpoints.Meghan E. McNamara & Stephen D. Reicher - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Dignitarian Medical Ethics.Linda Barclay - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (1):62-67.
    Philosophers and bioethicists are typically sceptical about invocations of dignity in ethical debates. Many believe that dignity is essentially devoid of meaning: either a mere rhetorical gesture used in the absence of good argument or a faddish term for existing values like autonomy and respect. On the other hand, the patient experience of dignity is a substantial area of research in healthcare fields like nursing and palliative care. In this paper, it is argued that philosophers have much to learn from (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Authenticity and Autonomy in Deep-Brain Stimulation.Alistair Wardrope - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (8):563-566.
    Felicitas Kraemer draws on the experiences of patients undergoing deep-brain stimulation to propose two distinct and potentially conflicting principles of respect: for an individual's autonomy , and for their authenticity. I argue instead that, according to commonly-invoked justifications of respect for autonomy, authenticity is itself in part constitutive of an analysis of autonomy worthy of respect; Kraemer's argument thus highlights the shortcomings of practical applications of respect for autonomy that emphasise competence while neglecting other important dimensions of autonomy such as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Disrespect and Political Resistance.Renante D. Pilapil - 2013 - Thesis Eleven 114 (1):48-60.
    This article examines the critical potential of Honneth’s theory or ethics of recognition by raising two concerns as regards the success of such a project. Firstly, this article argues that Honneth’s ethical turn in critical theory might not be completely warranted and that there are good reasons to supplement his theory of recognition with an account of justificatory practices. Secondly, it argues that the complexity of the beginnings of political resistance proves that an explanative gap remains to be filled to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Hostile Takeovers—An Analysis Through Just War Theory.Michael Kinsella - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (4):771-786.
    This paper examines the dynamics of hostile takeovers as a form of corporate warfare. There are a number of compelling reasons for believing this to be an accurate approximation to corporate reality and therefore an appropriate analogy. In circumstances where it is all-too easy for either of the protagonists to act unethically, there is an evident need for an appropriate template through which to analyse and evaluate the ethical dilemmas that HT's inevitably raise —whilst also, where possible, employing its prescriptions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Personal Autonomy.Sarah Buss - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    To be autonomous is to be a law to oneself; autonomous agents are self-governing agents. Most of us want to be autonomous because we want to be accountable for what we do, and because it seems that if we are not the ones calling the shots, then we cannot be accountable. More importantly, perhaps, the value of autonomy is tied to the value of self-integration. We don't want to be alien to, or at war with, ourselves; and it seems that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations