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  1. Philosophy, Critical Thinking and 'After-Birth Abortion: Why Should the Baby Live?'.Michael Tooley - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):266-272.
    Confronted with an article defending conclusions that many people judge problematic, philosophers are interested, first of all, in clarifying exactly what arguments are being offered for the views in question, and then, second, in carefully and dispassionately examining those arguments, to determine whether or not they are sound. As a philosopher, then, that is how I would naturally approach the article ‘After-birth abortion: why should the baby live?’, by Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva. Very few philosophical publications, however, have evoked (...)
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  • Moral Status and the Architects of Principlism.Francis Beckwith & Allison Krile Thornton - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (4-5):504-520.
    In this article, we discuss Beauchamp and Childress’s treatment of the issue of moral status. In particular, we introduce the five different perspectives on moral status that Beauchamp and Childress consider in Principles of Biomedical Ethics and explain their alternative to those perspectives, raise some critical questions about their approach, and offer a different way to think about one of the five theories of moral status that is more in line with what we believe some of its leading advocates affirm.
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  • Biothics, the Christian Citizen, and the Pluralist Game.Francis J. Beckwith - 2007 - Christian Bioethics 13 (2):159-170.
    The ascendancy of Christian activism in bioethical policy debates has elicited a number of responses by critics of this activism. These critics typically argue that the public square ought to embrace Secular Liberalism (SL), a perspective that its proponents maintain is the most just arrangement in a pluralist society, even though SL places restraints on Christian activists that are not placed on similarly situated citizens who hold more liberal views on bioethical questions. The author critiques three arguments that are offered (...)
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  • Fission and Confusion.David Hershenov & Rose Koch-Hershenov - 2006 - Christian Bioethics 12 (3):237-254.
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  • Fission and Confusion.David Hershenov & Rose Koch-Hershenov - 2006 - Christian Bioethics 12 (3):237-254.
    Catholic opponents of abortion and embryonic stem cell research usually base their position on a hylomorphic account of ensoulment at fertilization. They maintain that we each started out as one-cell ensouled organisms. Critics of this position argue that it is plagued by a number of intractable problems due to fission (twinning) and fusion. We're unconvinced that such objections to early ensoulment provide any reason to doubt the coherence of the hylomorphic account. However, we do maintain that a defense of ensoulment (...)
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  • Defending Abortion Philosophically: A Review of David Boonin's a Defense of Abortion. [REVIEW]Francis Beckwith - 2006 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (2):177 – 203.
    This article is a critical review of David Boonin's book, A Defense of Abortion (Cambridge University Press, 2002), a significant contribution to the literature on this subject and arguably the most important monograph on abortion published in the past twenty years. Boonin's defense of abortion consists almost exclusively of sophisticated critiques of a wide variety of pro-life arguments, including ones that are rarely defended by pro-life advocates. This article offers a brief presentation of the book's contents with extended assessments of (...)
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