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  1. What is in a Name? Parent, Professional and Policy-Maker Conceptions of Consent-Related Language in the Context of Newborn Screening.Stuart G. Nicholls, Holly Etchegary, Laure Tessier, Charlene Simmonds, Beth K. Potter, Jamie C. Brehaut, Daryl Pullman, Robin Z. Hayeems, Sari Zelenietz, Monica Lamoureux, Jennifer Milburn, Lesley Turner, Pranesh Chakraborty & Brenda J. Wilson - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (2):158-175.
    Newborn bloodspot screening programs are some of the longest running population screening programs internationally. Debate continues regarding the need for parents to give consent to having their child screened. Little attention has been paid to how meanings of consent-related terminology vary among stakeholders and the implications of this for practice. We undertook semi-structured interviews with parents, healthcare professionals and policy decision makers in two Canadian provinces. Conceptions of consent-related terms revolved around seven factors within two broad domains, decision-making and information (...)
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  • Understanding, Communication, and Consent.Joseph Millum & Danielle Bromwich - 2018 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 5:45-68.
    Misconceived Consent: Miguel has stage IV lung cancer. He has nearly exhausted his treatment options when his oncologist, Dr. Llewellyn, tells him about an experimental vaccine trial that may boost his immune response to kill cancer cells. Dr. Llewellyn provides Miguel with a consent form that explains why the study is being conducted, what procedures he will undergo, what the various risks and benefits are, alternative sources of treatment, and so forth. She even sits down with him, carefully talks through (...)
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  • Exploring Understanding of “Understanding”: The Paradigm Case of Biobank Consent Comprehension.Laura M. Beskow & Kevin P. Weinfurt - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (5):6-18.
    Data documenting poor understanding among research participants and real-time efforts to assess comprehension in large-scale studies are focusing new attention on informed consent comprehension. Within the context of biobanking consent, we previously convened a multidisciplinary panel to reach consensus about what information must be understood for a prospective participant’s consent to be considered valid. Subsequently, we presented them with data from another study showing that many U.S. adults would fail to comprehend the information the panel had deemed essential. When asked (...)
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  • Informed Consent: A Matter of Aspiration Since 1966.Sarah Wieten, Jacob Blythe & David Magnus - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (5):3-5.
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  • Authorized Concealment and Authorized Deception: Well-Intended Secrets Are Likely to Induce Nocebo Effects.Charlotte Blease - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (10):23-25.
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  • Destigmatising the Placebo Effect.Mark H. Arnold, Damien G. Finniss & Ian Kerridge - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (10):21-23.
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