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  1. The Timing of Research Consent.Benjamin Sachs - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (4):1033-1046.
    This essay is about the timing of research consent, a process that involves participants being given information about, among other things, upcoming research interventions and then being invited to waive their claims against those interventions being undertaken. The standard practice, as regards timing, is as follows: participants are invited to waive all their claims at a single moment in time, and that point in time immediately follows the information-provision. I argue that there we’re not justified in keeping to this practice. (...)
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  • Coerced Consent with an Unknown Future.Tom Dougherty - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 103 (2):441-461.
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Volume 103, Issue 2, Page 441-461, September 2021.
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  • Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Informed Consent: What Must Be Disclosed and What Must Be Understood?”.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph Millum - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (7):1-5.
    In “Informed Consent: What Must be Disclosed and What Must be Understood?”, we reject a dogma at the heart of research ethics. We demonstrate that the constitutive claim...
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  • Informed Consent, Disclosure, and Understanding.Tom Dougherty - 2020 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 48 (2):119-150.
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  • Informed Consent: What Must Be Disclosed and What Must Be Understood?Joseph Millum & Danielle Bromwich - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (5):46-58.
    Over the last few decades, multiple studies have examined the understanding of participants in clinical research. They show variable and often poor understanding of key elements of disclosure, such as expected risks and the experimental nature of treatments. Did the participants in these studies give valid consent? According to the standard view of informed consent they did not. The standard view holds that the recipient of consent has a duty to disclose certain information to the profferer of consent because valid (...)
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  • Randomised Controlled Trials in Medical AI: Ethical Considerations.Thomas Grote - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-107166.
    In recent years, there has been a surge of high-profile publications on applications of artificial intelligence systems for medical diagnosis and prognosis. While AI provides various opportunities for medical practice, there is an emerging consensus that the existing studies show considerable deficits and are unable to establish the clinical benefit of AI systems. Hence, the view that the clinical benefit of AI systems needs to be studied in clinical trials—particularly randomised controlled trials —is gaining ground. However, an issue that has (...)
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  • Why Have Uniform Informed Consent Documents When the Research Volunteers Are So Diverse?Ross E. McKinney - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (5):59-60.
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  • Consent to Sexual Interactions.Japa Pallikkathayil - 2019 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 19 (2):107-127.
    The way in which consent to sexual interactions is understood in the US is undergoing a transformation. Many universities, sometimes at the behest of lawmakers, are moving to adopt ‘affirmative consent’ policies, which define consent in terms of affirmative behavior that goes beyond mere silence or lack of resistance. Although these policies are a move in the right direction, I argue that their content has not been properly understood. In particular, the circumstances in which nonverbal behavior may communicate consent are (...)
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  • Consent’s Dominion: Dementia and Prior Consent to Sexual Relations.Samuel Director - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (9):1065-1071.
    In this paper, I answer the following question: suppose that two individuals, C and D, have been in a long-term committed relationship, and D now has dementia, while C is competent; if D agrees to have sex with C, is it permissible for C to have sex with D? Ultimately, I defend the view that, under certain conditions, D can give valid consent to sex with C, rendering sex between them permissible. Specifically, I argue there is compelling reason to endorse (...)
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