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  1. Zhuangzi’s Evaluation of Qing and its Relationship to Knowledge.Chiu Wai Wai - 2021 - Asian Philosophy 31 (3):288-304.
    This paper articulates the relationship between knowledge and qing 情 in the Zhuangzi. I argue that Zhuangzi has a twofold view of qing, which is structurally similar to his view of knowledge. I sta...
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  • Dynamic Model of Emotions: The Process of Forgetting in the Zhuangzi.Liu Linna & Sihao Chew - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (1):77-90.
    What is the viewpoint regarding the emotional lives of sages in the Zhuangzi 莊子? There are two conflicting positions in current scholarship: sages have emotions, and sages are without emotions. In this essay, we introduce these positions with their corresponding textual support and show that they are not satisfactory accounts. Specifically, we point out that the conflict arises as scholars adopt a static model of emotions. Thus, we propose that a better way to understand the emotional lives of sages is (...)
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  • Only Music Cannot Be Faked.Meilin Chinn - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (3):341-354.
    Among the various claims by early Chinese philosophers to hear someone’s de 德 or virtue through their music, the most astonishing statement may be found in the Yue Ji 樂記 : “Only Music cannot be faked”. While this classic Ru 儒 musical treatise on the development of human excellence in accordance with music is wide-ranging, the aim of this essay is narrow, in that it seeks to interpret this single sentence of the text by way of an explanation of the (...)
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  • Spontaneous Thought and Early Chinese Ideas of ‘Non-Action’ and ‘Emotion’.Halvor Eifring - 2019 - Asian Philosophy 29 (3):177-200.
    ABSTRACTThe early Chinese idea of non-action refers not to spontaneity, as has been argued, but to a relation between agency and spontaneity. Non-action needs to be seen in connection with the idea...
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  • Music and Affect: The Influence of the Xing Zi Ming Chu on the Xunzi and Yueji.Franklin Perkins - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (3):325-340.
    The Xing Zi Ming Chu 性自命出 presents a distinctive account of human dispositions that centers on the spontaneous arising of affects like joy and sadness. This focus on emotion grounds a particular conception of the function of music and ritual that gives music a central role in self-cultivation. Although the account of human dispositions in XZMC was ultimately overshadowed by the opposing views of Mengzi 孟子 and Xunzi 荀子 and the question of whether our dispositions are good or bad, its (...)
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  • Learning and Li: The Confucian Process of Humanization Through Ritual Propriety.Geir Sigurdsson - 2004 - Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
    Li, often translated as "ritual" or "ritual propriety," is among the most controversial notions of the Confucian philosophy. Its strong association with the Zhou tradition has caused it to be regarded with suspicion by both Western and Chinese representatives of modernity, mainly on the basis of the Enlightenment insistence of progressive rationality and liberation from the yoke of tradition. This work endeavors to offer a more balanced discussion of li by approaching it from the point of view of the Confucian (...)
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  • “Emotions That Do Not Move”: Zhuangzi and Stoics on Self-Emerging Feelings.David Machek - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (4):521-544.
    This essay develops a comparison between the Stoic and Daoist theories of emotions in order to provide a new interpretation of the emotional life of the wise person according to the Daoist classic Zhuangzi 莊子, and to shed light on larger divergences between the Greco-Roman and Chinese intellectual traditions. The core argument is that both Zhuangzi and the Stoics believed that there is a peculiar kind of emotional responses that emerge by themselves and are therefore wholly natural, since they do (...)
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