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Andrew Lambert [12]Andrew Lambert Jr [1]
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Andrew Lambert
College of Staten Island (CUNY)
  1.  32
    Friendship in the Confucian Tradition.Andrew Lambert - 2022 - In Diane Jeske (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Friendship. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. pp. 11-23.
    An overview of how friendship has been represented and assessed in the Confucian tradition, and particularly in classical Confucian texts such as the Analects and the Mencius. Themes covered include the relationship between the family and friendship, the ambivalence towards friendship in imperial China, and the connection between friendship and the Confucian ideal of personal cultivation. The chapter finishes by exploring novel conceptions of friendship and human relatedness suggested by the Confucian tradition.
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  2. Confucian Thought and Care Ethics: An Amicable Split?Andrew Lambert - 2016 - In Mat Foust and Sor-Hoon Tan (ed.), Feminist Encounters with Confucius. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 173-97.
    Since Chenyang Li’s (1994) groundbreaking article there has been interest in reading early Confucian ethics through the lens of care ethics. In this paper, I examine the prospects for dialogue between the two in light of recent work in both fields. I argue that, despite some similarities, early Confucian ethics is not best understood as a form of care ethics, of the kind articulated by Nel Noddings (1984, 2002) and others. Reasons include incongruence deriving from the absence in the Chinese (...)
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  3.  49
    Determinism and the Problem of Individual Freedom in Li Zehou’s Thought.Andrew Lambert - 2018 - In Li Zehou and Confucian Philosophy. Honolulu, HI, USA: pp. 94-117.
    Li Zehou’s work can be understood as an account of a Chinese modernity, a vision for Chinese society that seeks to integrate three distinct philosophical approaches. These are Chinese history and culture, which Li understands as largely Confucian; Marxism, which has exerted such influence on a modernizing China; and Western learning more generally, as expressed by figures such as Immanuel Kant and Sigmund Freud. Li also frequently expresses the hope that a Chinese modernity will be one in which the importance (...)
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  4. Impartiality, Close Friendships and the Confucian Tradition.Andrew Lambert - 2017 - In Marlein van Raalte Carla Risseeuw (ed.), Conceptualizing Friendship in Time and Place. Leiden: Brill. pp. 205-228.
    This article explores the relationship between friendship and morality. Two ideas have been influential in the history of moral philosophy: the impartial standpoint and close friendship. These two perspectives on thought and action can conflict, however, and such a case is presented here. In an attempt to resolve these tensions, and understand the assumption that gives rise to it, I explore an alternative conception of moral conduct and friendship suggested by early Confucian thought. Within this account, moral conduct is that (...)
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  5.  46
    Seeing Through the Aesthetic Worldview.Andrew Lambert - 2021 - In Ian Sullivan & Joshua Mason (ed.), One Corner of the Square: Essays on the Philosophy of Roger T. Ames. Honolulu, HI, USA: pp. pp141-150.
    An examination of Hall and Ames’s claim that the classical Confucian tradition be understood as constituting an aesthetic order. Some have argued that this claim is simply false. However, this claim should be understood not in terms of its literal truth or falsity, but in terms of its usefulness and suggestiveness. It is a general description that can guide inquiry into early Chinese thought. In what follows, I locate Hall and Ames’s “aesthetic order” within a broader interpretive lineage that understands (...)
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  6.  79
    Daoism and Disability.Andrew Lambert - 2016 - In Darla Y. Schumm & Michael Stoltzfus (eds.), Disability and World Religions: An Introduction. Baylor University Press.
    Ideas found in the early Daoist texts can inform current debates about disability, since the latter often involve assumptions about personhood and agency that Daoist texts do not share. The two canonical texts of classical Daoism, the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi, do not explicitly discuss disability as an object of theory or offer a model of it. They do, however, provide conceptual resources that can enrich contemporary discussions of disability. Two particular ideas are discussed here. Classical Daoist thinking about the (...)
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  7.  34
    LI Zehou: Synthesizing Confucius, Marx and Kant.Andrew Lambert - 2020 - In David Elstein (ed.), Dao Companion to Contemporary Confucian Philosophy. pp. 277-298.
    To understand the details of LI Zehou’s work, it is helpful to first locate it within the social and historical contexts to which Li was responding. Specifically, his work can be understood as a contribution to the struggle to establish the intellectual foundations of a Chinese modernity. As China transitioned away from the long-lived dynastic system that had ended early in the twentieth century, there was intense debate in China about what forms of social and political order should take its (...)
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  8.  32
    The Challenge of Teaching Chinese Philosophy: Thoughts on Method.Andrew Lambert - 2016 - ASIANetwork Exchange 23 (2):107-23.
    In this essay I offer an alternative perspective on how to organize class material for courses in Chinese philosophy for predominately American students. Instead of selecting topics taken from common themes in Western discourses, I suggest a variety of organizational strategies based on themes from the Chinese texts themselves, such as tradition, ritual, family, and guanxi (關係), which are rooted in the Chinese tradition but flexible enough to organize a broad range of philosophical material.
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  9.  79
    The Wrong of Rudeness. [REVIEW]Andrew Lambert - 2020 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2020.
    Amy Olberding, The Wrong of Rudeness: Learning Modern Civility from Ancient Chinese Philosophy, Oxford University Press, 2019, 183pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780190880965. Reviewed byAndrew Lambert, City University of New York, College of Staten Island.
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  10.  79
    Confucius: The Man and the Way of Gongfu by Peimin Ni. [REVIEW]Andrew Lambert Jr - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 68 (1):1-4.
    In Confucius: the Man and the Way of Gongfu, Peimin Ni offers an overview of the historical Confucius and his organic vision of how to live. Ni's motivation is that many comparable introductions are "simply repeating his life story and listing his main ideas". Ni insists that, "we have to get to the depth required by Confucius' thought", which will then explain why Confucius' influence has endured. The book is structured as six chapters, each focusing on one aspect of Confucius: (...)
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  11.  60
    Rorty, Pragmatism, and Confucianism. [REVIEW]Andrew Lambert - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1):134-139.
    Rorty, Pragmatism, and Confucianism, a collection of twelve essays on the work of Richard Rorty and its relation to Confucian thought, arose out of a conference in Shanghai in 2004, where participants were granted access to several of Rorty’s unpublished manuscripts. In his introduction, the editor Yong Huang states his desire to outline areas of shared interest in Rortian and Confucian thought. He notes, for example, the similarities between Rorty’s view that sentiment is “central to the moral consciousness” (p. 2) (...)
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