Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Emanuele Caminada: Vom Gemeingeist zum Habitus: Husserls Ideen II. Sozialphilosophische Implikationen der Phänomenologie. Cham: Springer, 2019 (Phaenomenologica, Bd. 225). ISBN 978-3-319-97985-4, 375 + xix Seiten. 69,99 € (Hardcover), 54,99 €. [REVIEW]Marco Cavallaro - 2020 - Husserl Studies 36 (2):191-204.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Phenomenological Paradigm for Empirical Research in Psychiatry and Psychology: Open Questions.Leonor Irarrázaval - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Towards a Phenomenological Analysis of Fictional Emotions.Marco Cavallaro - 2019 - Phainomenon. Journal of Phenomenological Philosophy 29:57-81.
    What are fictional emotions and what has phenomenology to say about them? This paper argues that the experience of fictional emotions entails a splitting of the subject between a real and a phantasy ego. The real ego is the ego that imagines something; the phantasy ego is the ego that is necessarily co-posited by any experience of imagining something. Fictional emotions are phantasy emotions of the phantasy ego. The intentional structure of fictional emotions, the nature of their fictional object, as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ego-Splitting and the Transcendental Subject. Kant’s Original Insight and Husserl’s Reappraisal.Marco Cavallaro - 2020 - In Iulian Apostolescu (ed.), The Subject(s) of Phenomenology. Rereading Husserl. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 107-133.
    In this paper, I contend that there are at least two essential traits that commonly define being an I: self-identity and self-consciousness. I argue that they bear quite an odd relation to each other in the sense that self-consciousness seems to jeopardize self-identity. My main concern is to elucidate this issue within the range of the transcendental philosophies of Immanuel Kant and Edmund Husserl. In the first section, I shall briefly consider Kant’s own rendition of the problem of the Egosplitting. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark