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  1. Ethical Implications of Alzheimer’s Disease Prediction in Asymptomatic Individuals Through Artificial Intelligence.Frank Ursin, Cristian Timmermann & Florian Steger - 2021 - Diagnostics 11 (3):440.
    Biomarker-based predictive tests for subjectively asymptomatic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are utilized in research today. Novel applications of artificial intelligence (AI) promise to predict the onset of AD several years in advance without determining biomarker thresholds. Until now, little attention has been paid to the new ethical challenges that AI brings to the early diagnosis in asymptomatic individuals, beyond contributing to research purposes, when we still lack adequate treatment. The aim of this paper is to explore the ethical arguments put forward (...)
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  • The Right Not to Know: Some Steps Towards a Compromise.Ben Davies & Julian Savulescu - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (1):137-150.
    There is an ongoing debate in medicine about whether patients have a ‘right not to know’ pertinent medical information, such as diagnoses of life-altering diseases. While this debate has employed various ethical concepts, probably the most widely-used by both defenders and detractors of the right is autonomy. Whereas defenders of the right not to know typically employ a ‘liberty’ conception of autonomy, according to which to be autonomous involves doing what one wants to do, opponents of the right not to (...)
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  • ‘The Right Not to Know and the Obligation to Know’, Response to Commentaries.Ben Davies - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (5):309-310.
    Response to commentaries on 'The right not to know and the obligation to know'.
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  • Is There a Right Not to Know?John Harris - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (6):414-415.
    In his subtle and well-argued paper,1 Ben Davies argues for a limited but still strong right not to know held by patients against medical professionals. Patients may have such a right against health professionals to be sure, but if and only if, that right has been granted to them by the health professionals in question, their professional body or rules regarding professional conduct. In my judgement, patients do not have a moral RNTK and should have no such legal right neither, (...)
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  • Is the Right Not to Know an Instance of ‘Bad Faith’?Aisha Deslandes - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (5):308-308.
    The ‘right not to know’ can be used by patients as a safeguard against the effects that certain medical information can have on their well-being. At first glance, one might reason it suitable for a patient to enact their RNTK. However, although Davies states that RNTK gives people the ability to both protect themselves from self-perceived harm and exercise their autonomy, I will argue that ‘not knowing’ hinders patients’ ability to exercise their existential freedom and represents what Sartre calls an (...)
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