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  1. Decisions That Hasten Death: Double Effect and the Experiences of Physicians in Australia.Steven A. Trankle - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):26.
    In Australian end-of-life care, practicing euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide is illegal. Despite this, death hastening practices are common across medical settings. Practices can be clandestine or overt but in many instances physicians are forced to seek protection behind ambiguous medico-legal imperatives such as the Principle of Double Effect. Moreover, the way they conceptualise and experience such practices is inconsistent. To complement the available statistical data, the purpose of this study was to understand the reasoning behind how and why physicians in (...)
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  • Approaches to Suffering at the End of Life: The Use of Sedation in the USA and Netherlands: Table 1.Judith A. C. Rietjens, Jennifer R. Voorhees, Agnes van der Heide & Margaret A. Drickamer - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (4):235-240.
    Background Studies describing physicians’ experiences with sedation at the end of life are indispensible for informed palliative care practice, but they are scarce. We describe the accounts of physicians from the USA and the Netherlands, two countries with different regulations on end-of-life decisions regarding their use of sedation.Methods Qualitative face-to-face interviews were held in 2007–2008 with 36 physicians , including primary care physicians and specialists. We applied purposive sampling and conducted constant comparative analyses.Results In both countries, the use of sedation (...)
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  • Experimental Philosophy, Clinical Intentions, and Evaluative Judgment.Lynn A. Jansen, Jessica S. Fogel & Mark Brubaker - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (2):126-135.
    Recent empirical work on the concept of intentionality suggests that people’s assessments of whether an action is intentional are subject to uncertainty. Some researchers have gone so far as to claim that different people employ different concepts of intentional action. These possibilities have motivated a good deal of work in the relatively new field of experimental philosophy. The findings from this empirical research may prove to be relevant to medical ethics. -/- In this article, we address this issue head on. (...)
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  • The Lacking of Moral Equivalency for Continuous Sedation and PAS.Samuel H. LiPuma - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):48 - 49.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 48-49, June 2011.
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  • Continuous Deep Sedation: Consistent With Physician's Role as Healer.Eli Feen - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):49 - 51.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 49-51, June 2011.
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  • Intentions in Critical Clinical Settings: A Study of Medical Students' Perceptions.N. Juth, T. Tillberg & N. Lynoe - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):483-486.
    The aim of this pilot study was to develop a realistic clinical case for identifying Knobe's asymmetric effect, ie, the tendency to ascribe intentions to a larger extent when an act is considered wrong, as well as to compare medical students at the beginning and end of their curriculum. A vignette about a critically ill 72-year-old patient in need of an operation was used, with two different outcomes: the patient dies or the patient recovers. Approximately half of the students received (...)
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  • Disambiguating Clinical Intentions: The Ethics of Palliative Sedation.L. A. Jansen - 2010 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (1):19-31.
    It is often claimed that the intentions of physicians are multiple, ambiguous, and uncertain—at least with respect to end-of-life care. This claim provides support for the conclusion that the principle of double effect is of little or no value as a guide to end-of-life pain management. This paper critically discusses this claim. It argues that proponents of the claim fail to distinguish two different senses of “intention,” and that, as a result, they are led to exaggerate the extent to which (...)
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  • End-of-Life Decisions and Moral Psychology: Killing, Letting Die, Intention and Foresight. [REVIEW]Charles Douglas - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):337-347.
    In contemplating any life and death moral dilemma, one is often struck by the possible importance of two distinctions; the distinction between killing and “letting die”, and the distinction between an intentional killing and an action aimed at some other outcome that causes death as a foreseen but unintended “side-effect”. Many feel intuitively that these distinctions are morally significant, but attempts to explain why this might be so have been unconvincing. In this paper, I explore the problem from an explicitly (...)
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  • Palliative Sedation, Foregoing Life-Sustaining Treatment, and Aid-in-Dying: What is the Difference?Patrick Daly - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (3):197-213.
    After a review of terminology, I identify—in addition to Margaret Battin’s list of five primary arguments for and against aid-in-dying—the argument from functional equivalence as another primary argument. I introduce a novel way to approach this argument based on Bernard Lonergan’s generalized empirical method. Then I proceed on the basis of GEM to distinguish palliative sedation, palliative sedation to unconsciousness when prognosis is less than two weeks, and foregoing life-sustaining treatment from aid-in-dying. I conclude that aid-in-dying must be justified on (...)
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  • Morally-Relevant Similarities and Differences Between Assisted Dying Practices in Paradigm and Non-Paradigm Circumstances: Could They Inform Regulatory Decisions?Jeffrey Kirby - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (4):475-483.
    There has been contentious debate over the years about whether there are morally relevant similarities and differences between the three practices of continuous deep sedation until death, physician-assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia. Surprisingly little academic attention has been paid to a comparison of the uses of these practices in the two types of circumstances in which they are typically performed. A comparative domains of ethics analysis methodological approach is used in the paper to compare 1) the use of the three (...)
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  • Moral Concerns with Sedation at the End of Life.C. Douglas - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (4):241-241.
    Two studies reported in the Journal of Medical Ethics add to the growing body of qualitative evidence relating to the use of sedatives at the end of life.1 ,2 Respondents in the two studies affirm a number of important concerns, most of which have been elaborated in the philosophy and palliative care literature, relating to the use of sedation. There seems little doubt that the common moral thread to most of these concerns is the possibility that end-of-life sedation can resemble (...)
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  • Accessing the Ethics of Complex Health Care Practices: Would a “Domains of Ethics Analysis” Approach Help? [REVIEW]Jeffrey Kirby - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (2):133-143.
    This paper explores how using a domains of ethics analysis approach might constructively contribute to an enhanced understanding (among those without specialized ethics training) of ethically-complex health care practices through the consideration of one such sample practice, i.e., deep and continuous palliative sedation (DCPS). For this purpose, I select four sample ethics domains (from a variety of possible relevant domains) for use in the consideration of this practice, i.e., autonomous choice, motives, actions and consequences. These particular domains were choosen because (...)
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  • Questions and Answers on the Belgian Model of Integral End-of-Life Care: Experiment? Prototype?Jan L. Bernheim, Wim Distelmans, Arsène Mullie & Michael A. Ashby - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (4):507-529.
    This article analyses domestic and foreign reactions to a 2008 report in the British Medical Journal on the complementary and, as argued, synergistic relationship between palliative care and euthanasia in Belgium. The earliest initiators of palliative care in Belgium in the late 1970s held the view that access to proper palliative care was a precondition for euthanasia to be acceptable and that euthanasia and palliative care could, and should, develop together. Advocates of euthanasia including author Jan Bernheim, independent from but (...)
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