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  1. A Speech-Act Model for Talking to Management. Building a Framework for Evaluating Communication Within the SRI Engagement Process.Wim Vandekerckhove, Jos Leys & Dirk Van Braeckel - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):77 - 91.
    Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) has grown considerably over the past three decades. One form of SRI, engagement-SRI, is today by far the most practiced form of SRI (in assets managed) and has the potential to mainstream SRI even further. However, lack of formalized engagement procedures and evaluation tools leave the engagement practice too opaque for such a mainstreaming. This article can be considered as a first step in the development of a standard for the engagement practice. By developing an engagement (...)
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  • The Ties That Blind: The Moral Value of Anonymity.Ponesse Julie - unknown
    This paper has two main aims: one is to understand the mechanisms that allow anonymity to facilitate both good and bad ends; the other is to use this understanding to determine the value of anonymity relative to its disvalue across a variety of moral and socio-political domains. Building on previous work in which I characterize anonymity by what I call the ‘central anonymity paradigm,’ I argue here that anonymity is primarily instrumentally valuable as a strategic device to procure some other (...)
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  • Value Orientations as Determinants of Preference for External and Anonymous Whistleblowing.Dilek Zamantili Nayir & Christian Herzig - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):197-213.
    Incidences of organizational wrongdoing have become wide spread throughout the whole business world. The management of organizational wrongdoings is of growing concern in organizations globally, since these types of acts can be detrimental to financial well being. Wrongdoing occurs within organizational settings and organizational members commonly have knowledge of and thus the opportunity to report the wrongdoing. An employee’s decision to report individual or organizational misconduct, i.e. blow the whistle, is a complex phenomenon that is based upon organizational, situational and (...)
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  • The Influence of Confucian Ethics and Collectivism on Whistleblowing Intentions: A Study of South Korean Public Employees.Heungsik Park, Michael T. Rehg & Donggi Lee - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (4):387-403.
    The current study presents the findings of an empirical inquiry into the effects of Confucian ethics and collectivism, on individual whistleblowing intentions. Confucian Ethics and Individualism–Collectivism were measured in a questionnaire completed by 343 public officials in South Korea. This study found that Confucian ethics had significant but mixed effects on whistleblowing intentions. The affection between father and son had a negative effect on internal and external whistleblowing intentions, while the distinction between the roles of husband and wife had a (...)
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  • An Examination of the Layers of Workplace Influences in Ethical Judgments: Whistleblowing Likelihood and Perseverance in Public Accounting.Eileen Z. Taylor & Mary B. Curtis - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):21-37.
    We employ a Layers of Workplace Influence theory to guide our study of whistleblowing among public accounting audit seniors. Specifically, we examine professional commitment, organizational commitment versus colleague commitment (locus of commitment), and moral intensity of the unethical behavior on two measures of reporting intentions: likelihood of reporting and perseverance in reporting. We find that moral intensity relates to both reporting intention measures. In addition, while high levels of professional identity increase the likelihood that an auditor will initially report an (...)
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  • Organizational Dissidence: The Case of Whistle-Blowing. [REVIEW]Janet P. Near & Marcia P. Miceli - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (1):1 - 16.
    Research on whistle-blowing has been hampered by a lack of a sound theoretical base. In this paper, we draw upon existing theories of motivation and power relationships to propose a model of the whistle-blowing process. This model focuses on decisions made by organization members who believe they have evidence of organizational wrongdoing, and the reactions of organization authorities. Based on a review of the sparse empirical literature, we suggest variables that may affect both the members' decisions and the organization's responses.
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  • The Internal Disclosure Policies of Private-Sector Employers: An Initial Look at Their Relationship to Employee Whistleblowing. [REVIEW]Tim Barnett, Daniel S. Cochran & G. Stephen Taylor - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (2):127 - 136.
    Whistleblowers have usually been treated as outcasts by private-sector employers. But legal, ethical, and practical considerations increasingly compel companies to encourage employees to disclose suspected illegal and/or unethical activities throughinternal communication channels. Internal disclosure policies/procedures (IDPP''s) have been recommended as one way to encourage such communication.This study examined the relationship between IDPP''s and employee whistleblowing among private-sector employers. Almost 300 human resources executives provided data concerning their organizations'' experiences.
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  • Ethical Tension Points in Whistleblowing.J. Vernon Jensen - 1987 - Journal of Business Ethics 6 (4):321 - 328.
    This paper analyzes the number of procedural and substantive tension points with which a conscientious whistleblower struggles. Included in the former are such questions as: (1) Am I properly depicting the seriousness of the problem? (2) Have I secured the information properly, analyzed it appropriately, and presented it fairly? (3) Are my motives appropriate? (4) Have I tried fully enough to have the problem corrected within the organization? (5) Should I blow the whistle while still a member of the organization (...)
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  • A Preliminary Investigation of the Relationship Between Selected Organizational Characteristics and External Whistleblowing by Employees.Tim Barnett - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (12):949 - 959.
    Whistleblowing by employees to regulatory agencies and other parties external to the organization can have serious consequences both for the whistleblower and the company involved. Research has largely focused on individual and group variables that affect individuals'' decision to blow the whistle on perceived wrongdoing.This study examined the relationship between selected organizational characteristics and the perceived level of external whistleblowing by employees in 240 organizations. Data collected in a nationwide survey of human resource executives were analyzed using analysis of variance.
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  • Academic Dishonesty and Whistleblowing in a Higher Education Institution: A Sociological Analysis.Ugljesa Radulovic & Tina Uys - 2019 - African Journal of Business Ethics 13 (2).
    High rates of academic dishonesty are a concern, and whistleblowing is a mechanism that can curb the incidence thereof. This study attempted to identify the variables associated with the reporting of academic dishonesty, framing itself within the reasoned action approach. It entailed a survey with a sample of 405 undergraduate sociology students. Data was collected by means of self-administered structured questionnaire. Five factors mediate the willingness to report: students’ general honesty; their level of academic honesty; the justification for committing academic (...)
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  • A Justification of Whistleblowing.Daniele Santoro & Manohar Kumar - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (7):669-684.
    Whistleblowing is the act of disclosing information from a public or private organization in order to reveal cases of corruption that are of immediate or potential danger to the public. Blowing the whistle involves personal risk, especially when legal protection is absent, and charges of betrayal, which often come in the form of legal prosecution under treason laws. In this article we argue that whistleblowing is justified when disclosures are made with the proper intent and fulfill specific communicative constraints in (...)
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  • From Inaction to External Whistleblowing: The Influence of the Ethical Culture of Organizations on Employee Responses to Observed Wrongdoing. [REVIEW]Muel Kaptein - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):513 - 530.
    Putting measures in place to prevent wrongdoing in organizations is important, but detecting and correcting wrongdoing are also vital. Employees who detect wrongdoing should, therefore, be encouraged to respond in a manner that supports corrective action. This article examines the influence of the ethical culture of organizations on employee responses to observed wrongdoing. Different dimensions of ethical culture are related to different types of intended responses. The findings show that several dimensions of ethical culture were negatively related to intended inaction (...)
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  • The Ties That Blind: Conceptualizing Anonymity.Julie Ponesse - 2014 - Journal of Social Philosophy 45 (3):304-322.
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  • Whistle-Blowing Process in Healthcare: From Suspicion to Action.Johanna Pohjanoksa, Minna Stolt, Riitta Suhonen, Eliisa Löyttyniemi & Helena Leino-Kilpi - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):526-540.
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  • Focusing on Individuals' Ethical Judgement in Corporate Social Responsibility Curricula.Patrick Maclagan & Tim Campbell - 2011 - Business Ethics 20 (4):392-404.
    Adequate discussion of individuals' moral deliberation is notably absent from much of the literature on corporate social responsibility (CSR). We argue for a refocusing on the role of the individual in that context. In particular we regard this as important in CSR course design, for practical, pedagogical and moral reasons. After addressing some of the theoretical background to our argument, and noting some respects in which individual action features in the context of CSR, we consider the usefulness (or otherwise) of (...)
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  • Influence of Ethical Position on Whistleblowing Behaviour: Do Preferred Channels in Private and Public Sectors Differ?Dilek Zamantılı Nayır, Michael T. Rehg & Yurdanur Asa - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (1):147-167.
    Whistleblowing refers to the disclosure by organization members of illegal, immoral, or illegitimate practices to persons or organizations that may be able to effect action. Most studies on the topic have been conducted in North American or European private sector organizations, and less attention has been paid to regions such as Turkey. In this study, we study the whistleblowing intentions and channel choices of Turkish employees in private and public sector organizations. Using data from 327 private sector and 405 public (...)
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  • The Evolution of Whistleblowing Studies: A Critical Review and Research Agenda.Barbara Culiberg & Katarina Katja Mihelič - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (4):787-803.
    Whistleblowing is a controversial yet socially significant topic of interest due to its impact on employees, organizations, and society at large. The purpose of this paper is to integrate knowledge of whistleblowing with theoretical advancements in the broader domain of business ethics to propose a novel approach to research and practice engaged in this complex phenomenon. The paper offers a conceptual framework, i.e., the wheel of whistleblowing, that is developed to portray the different features of whistleblowing by applying the whistleblower’s (...)
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  • Whistleblowing in a Changing Legal Climate: Is It Time to Revisit Our Approach to Trust and Loyalty at the Workplace?David Lewis - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (1):71-87.
    This article suggests that the introduction of employment protection rights for whistleblowers has implications for the way in which trust and loyalty should be viewed at the workplace. In particular, it is argued that the very existence of legislative provisions in the United Kingdom reinforces the notion that whistleblowing should not be regarded as either deviant or disloyal behaviour. Thus, the internal reporting of concerns can be seen as an act of trust and loyalty in drawing the employer's attention to (...)
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  • Focusing on Individuals' Ethical Judgement in Corporate Social Responsibility Curricula.Patrick Maclagan & Tim Campbell - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (4):392-404.
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  • Whistleblowing: A Critical Philosophical Analysis of the Component Moral Decisions of the Act and Some New Perspectives on its Moral Significance.Patrick O'Sullivan & Ola Ngau - 2014 - Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (4):401-415.
    Discussions of whistleblowing whether in academic literature or in more popular media have tended to very one-sided assessments of the moral worth of the act. Indeed, much of the current literature concentrates on psychological or managerial aspects of whistleblowing while taking for granted this or that moral position or eschewing any normative commitment on the question. The purpose of this article is firstly to reemphasise the importance and complexity of the normative foundations of whistleblowing acts; and secondly, through a moral (...)
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