Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Care Ethics and Obligations to Future Generations.Thomas Randall - 2019 - Hypatia 34 (3):527-545.
    A dominant area of inquiry within intergenerational ethics concerns how goods ought to be justly distributed between noncontemporaries. Contractualist theories of justice that have broached these discussions have often centered on the concepts of mutual advantage and reciprocal cooperation between rational, self‐interested beings. However, another prominent reason that many in the present feel that they have obligations toward future generations is not due to self‐interested reciprocity, but simply because they care about what happens to them. Care ethics promises to be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • More Co-Parents, Fewer Children: Multiparenting and Sustainable Population.Anca Gheaus - 2019 - Essays in Philosophy 20 (1):3-23.
    Some philosophers argue that we should limit procreation – for instance, to one child per person or one child per couple – in order to reduce our aggregate carbon footprint. I provide additional support to the claim that population size is a matter of justice, by explaining that we have a duty of justice towards the current generation of children to pass on to them a sustainable population. But instead of, or, more likely, alongside with, having fewer children in in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • On Climate Matters: Offsetting, Population, and Justice.Elizabeth Cripps - 2016 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):114-128.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Procreative-Parenting, Love's Reasons and the Demands of Morality.Luara Ferracioli - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (270):77-97.
    Many philosophers believe that the relationship between a parent and a child is objectively valuable, but few believe that there is any objective value in first creating a child in order to parent her. But if it is indeed true that all of the objective value of procreative-parenting comes from parenting, then it is hard to see how procreative-parenting can overcome two particularly pressing philosophical challenges. A first challenge is to show that it is morally permissible for prospective parents to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Rights of Future Persons Under Attack: Correlativity in the Non-Identity Problem.Andre Campos - 2019 - Philosophia 47 (3):625-648.
    This paper aims at answering some of the objections to the NIP’s criticism of the idea of rights of future persons. Those objections usually adopt different perspectives depending on how they understand differently the nature of the correlativity between rights and duties – some adopt a present-rights-of-future-persons view, others a future-rights-of-future-persons view, others a transitive present-rights-of-present-persons view, and others still an eternalist view of rights and persons. The paper will try to show that only a non-transitive present-rights-of-present-persons view can survive (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Parenthood and Procreation.Tim Bayne & Avery Kolers - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Do Parents Have a Special Duty to Mitigate Climate Change?Elizabeth Cripps - 2017 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 16 (3):308-325.
    This article argues that parents have a special, shared duty to organize for collective action on climate change mitigation and adaptation, but not for the reason one might assume. The apparently obvious reason is that climate change threatens life, health and community for the next generation, and parents have a special duty to their children to protect their basic human interests. This argument fails because many parents could protect their children from these central harms without taking more general action to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Childhood Bads, Parenting Goods, and the Right to Procreate.Sarah Hannan & R. J. Leland - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 21 (3):366-384.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Intergenerational Justice Today.Andre Santos Campos - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (3).
    A theory of intergenerational justice consists in the study of the moral and political status of the relations between present and past or future people, more specifically, of the obligations and entitlements they can potentially generate. The challenges that justify talking about responsibilities between generations are myriad. And the disputes they prompt can focus on the past just as much as on the present, even though the fact that the human species has reached a state of technological progress that enables (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark