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  1. Relational Autonomy: Lessons From COVID-19 and Twentieth-Century Philosophy.Carlos Gómez-Vírseda & Rafael Amo Usanos - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 24 (4):493-505.
    COVID-19 has turned many ethical principles and presuppositions upside down. More precisely, the principle of respect for autonomy has been shown to be ill suited to face the ethical challenges posed by the current health crisis. Individual wishes and choices have been subordinated to public interests. Patients have received trial therapies under extraordinary procedures of informed consent. The principle of respect for autonomy, at least in its mainstream interpretation, has been particularly questioned during this pandemic. Further reflection on the nature (...)
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  • Analyzing the Paradigmatic Cases of Two Persons with a Disorder of Consciousness: Reflections on the Legal and Ethical Perspectives.Davide Sattin, Davide Torri, Lino Panzeri & Mario Picozzi - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundMedia have increasingly reported on the difficulties associated with end-of-life decision-making in patients with Disorders of Consciousness, contextualizing such dilemma in detailed accounts of the patient’s life. Two of the first stories debated in the scientific community were those related to the cases of two women, one American, the other Italian, who captured attention of millions of people in the first years of this third millennium.MethodsMuch has been written about the challenges of surrogate decision-making for patients in DOC, but less (...)
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  • Relational Autonomy, the Right to Reject Treatment, and Advance Directives in Japan.Anri Asagumo - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 14 (1):57-69.
    Although the patient’s right to decide what they want for themselves, which is encompassed in the notion of ‘patient-centred medicine’ and ‘informed consent’, is widely recognised and emphasised in Japan, there remain grave problems when it comes to respecting the wishes of the no-longer-competent when death is imminent. In general, it is believed that the concepts above do not include the right to refuse treatment when treatment withdrawal inevitably results in death, even when the patient previously expressed the wish to (...)
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  • Euthanasia in Persons with Advanced Dementia: A Dignity-Enhancing Care Approach.Carlos Gómez-Vírseda & Chris Gastmans - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107308.
    In current Western societies, increasing numbers of people express their desire to choose when to die. Allowing people to choose the moment of their death is an ethical issue that should be embedded in sound clinical and legal frameworks. In the case of persons with dementia, it raises further ethical questions such as: Does the person have the capacity to make the choice? Is the person being coerced? Who should be involved in the decision? Is the person’s suffering untreatable? The (...)
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