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Harvard Law Review 127 (2):652-665 (2013)

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  1. Social Norms in the Theory of Mass Atrocity and Transitional Justice.Paul Christopher Morrow - unknown
    Recent philosophical research on normativity has clarified the nature and dynamics of social norms. Social norms are distinguished from legal and moral norms on the basis of their scope, their grounds, their characteristic forms of accountability, or some combination of these features. Because of their distinct character, social norms can reinforce practical prescriptions, prohibitions, and permissions provided to particular actors by legal or moral norms. They also can conflict drastically with those prescriptions, prohibitions, and permissions resulting in serious practical dilemmas. (...)
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  • Chewing Cud: Revisiting Hart and Jurisprudence.Allan C. Hutchinson - 2014 - Jurisprudence 5 (1):29-40.
    The recent publication of a lost essay by Herbert Hart is important for an historical appreciation of his work, but its likely celebration is a sad testament to the poverty and lethargy of contemporary legal thought. I use this occasion to review the state and condition of contemporary legal theorising. After positioning Hart's essay in the prevailing jurisprudential milieu, I highlight the thrust and the failings of the three main traditional approaches to contemporary legal theorising in regard to the nature (...)
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  • Legal Philosophy and the Social Sciences: The Potential for Complementarity.Kevin Walton - 2015 - Jurisprudence 6 (2):231-251.
    In this paper, I argue that dialogue between legal philosophers and social scientists can be mutually beneficial. Nicola Lacey offers a vision of jurisprudence that supposes as much. I start by setting out my interpretation of her view. I then defend its potential, which she takes for granted, from the challenges posed by, first, an apparent friend—Brian Leiter—and, second, obvious adversaries—Joseph Raz and others. My response proposes an alternative to their conceptions of legal philosophy, one that is consistent with my (...)
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  • Finding Written Law.Benjamin L. S. Nelson - manuscript
    In this paper I argue that textualism is far less attractive as a theory of written law than some of its modern proponents think. For it is not usually sensible to expect the grammatical meaning of a provision to determine its appropriate legal meaning. Factors that are unrelated to grammar in the identification of law (e.g., legal theory, context) do too much of the work. **Draft -- acknowledgments welcome, but please do not cite.**.
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  • The Rule of Law and Equality.Paul Gowder - 2013 - Law and Philosophy 32 (5):565-618.
    This paper describes and defends a novel and distinctively egalitarian conception of the rule of law. Official behavior is to be governed by preexisting, public rules that do not draw irrelevant distinctions between the subjects of law. If these demands are satisfied, a state achieves vertical equality between officials and ordinary people and horizontal legal equality among ordinary people.
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  • Planning Facts Through Law: Legal Reasonableness as Creative Indexicality and Trans-Categorical Re-Configuration.Mario Ricca - 2020 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 33 (4):1089-1123.
    Legal reasonableness and its theoretical analysis are often gauged on judicial activity. However, the judicial exercise of reasonableness is always a post-factum activity. People produce facts, and then courts are called to ascertain and qualify their conduct to determine its legal consequences. The use of reasonableness appears, in this way, almost inherently grafted onto a pre-existing divide between facts and legal rules. Reasonableness would appear to be mainly engaged in the balancing of the semantic spectrums of law’s provisions and their (...)
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