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  1. Why Organ Conscription Should Be Off the Table: Extrapolation From Heidegger’s Being and Time.Susan B. Levin - 2019 - Sophia 58 (2):153-174.
    The question, what measures to address the shortage of transplantable organs are ethically permissible? requires careful attention because, apart from its impact on medical practice, the stance we espouse here reflects our interpretations of human freedom and mortality. To raise the number of available organs, on utilitarian grounds, bioethicists and medical professionals increasingly support mandatory procurement. This view is at odds with the Catechism of the Catholic Church, according to which ‘[o]rgan donation after death is a noble and meritorious act’ (...)
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  • Heideggerian Structures of Being-with in the Nurse–Patient Relationship: Modelling Phenomenological Analysis Through Qualitative Meta-Synthesis.Janice Gullick, John Wu, Cindy Reid, Agness Chisanga Tembo, Sara Shishehgar & Lisa Conlon - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (4):645-664.
    Heideggerian philosophy is frequently chosen as a philosophical framing, and/or a hermeneutic analytical structure in qualitative nursing research. As Heideggerian philosophy is dense, there is merit in the development of scholarly resources that help to explain discrete Heideggerian concepts and to uncover their relevance to contemporary human experience. This paper uses a meta-synthesis methodology to pool and synthesise findings from 29 phenomenological research reports on Being-with in the nurse–patient relationship. We firstly considered and secured the most relevant Heideggerian elements to (...)
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  • A Rumor of Empathy: Reconstructing Heidegger’s Contribution to Empathy and Empathic Clinical Practice.Lou Agosta - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (2):281-292.
    This article takes Heidegger's design distinctions for human being [Dasein] including affectivity, understanding, and speech, and, using these distinctions, generates a Heideggerian definition of empathy [Einfuehlung]. This article distinguishes empathic receptivity, empathic understanding, empathic interpretation, and empathic speech (or responsiveness). It also looks at characteristic breakdowns.
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  • The Spiritual Side of the Ethics Crisis.Raymond D. Smith - 2005 - Journal of Human Values 11 (1):63-71.
    The article discusses the failure of the current positivistic and materialist business ethics paradigms to adequately deal with the enormity of the contemporary business ethics crisis. Citing behavioural research into the linkage between beliefs, values and behaviour, the author suggests spiritual renewal as a solution based on the ‘fallenness’ of mankind and the reality of human evil. The concept of faith, obedience and the resulting ‘kingdom consciousness’ is explored as a basis for spiritual renewal leading to behavioural change. The process (...)
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  • On Technology and the Prospects for Good Practice in the Human Services: Donald Schön, Martin Heidegger, and the Case for Phronesis and Praxis.M. Emslie & R. Watts - forthcoming - .
    Technology is fundamental to and embedded in the way practice is conceptualized and institutionalized in social service work. Many scholars assume and expect that good practices of care are achieved with the correct application of theory produced by rigorous scientific research. However, there are significant critiques of this viewpoint. We examine the work of Donald Schön and Martin Heidegger and agree with these authors' suggestions that technical rationality and modern technology are not the way to achieve good practice in the (...)
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  • The Genuine Possibility of Being-With: Watsuji, Heidegger, and the Primacy of Betweenness.Carolyn Culbertson - 2019 - Tandf: Comparative and Continental Philosophy 11 (1):7-18.
    Volume 11, Issue 1, March 2019, Page 7-18.
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  • Heidegger on Aristotelian Phronêsis and Moral Justification.David Zoller - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (4):778-794.
    Recent reconstructions of Heidegger's thoughts on ethics have a curious paradoxical feature. On the one hand, Heidegger, particularly in his Aristotle lectures of the 1920s, offers a view of practical reason on which Dasein has its “moral knowledge” in a fully perceptual, non-cognitive way. This generally sets Heidegger in opposition to the whole business of principled moral justification before the fact. On the other hand, the literature is peppered with what appear to be principled denunciations of immorality—particularly violations of other (...)
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  • Heidegger and Dilthey: Language, History, and Hermeneutics.Eric S. Nelson - 2014 - In Megan Altman Hans Pedersen (ed.), Horizons of Authenticity in Phenomenology, Existentialism, and Moral Psychology. springer. pp. 109-128.
    The hermeneutical tradition represented by Yorck, Heidegger, and Gadamer has distrusted Dilthey as suffering from the two sins of modernism: scientific “positivism” and individualistic and aesthetic “romanticism.” On the one hand, Dilthey’s epistemology is deemed scientistic in accepting the priority of the empirical, the ontic, and consequently scientific inquiry into the physical, biological, and human worlds; on the other hand, his personalist ethos and Goethean humanism, and his pluralistic life- and worldview philosophy are considered excessively aesthetic, culturally liberal, relativistic, and (...)
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  • Reflexive Learning: Stages Towards Wisdom with Dreyfus.Ian McPherson - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (5):705-718.
    The Dreyfus account of seven stages of learning is considered in the context of the Dreyfus account of five stages of skill development. The two new stages, Mastery and Practical Wisdom, make more explicit certain themes implicit in the five‐stage account. In this way Dreyfus encourages a more reflexive approach. The themes now more explicit are, in part, derived from Aristotle on phronesis, but are also influenced by Heidegger and Foucault on cultural dimensions of meaning and value. The paper considers (...)
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  • To Stay or to Go, to Speak or Stay Silent, to Act or Not to Act: Moral Distress as Experienced by Psychologists.Wendy Austin, Marlene Rankel, Leon Kagan, Vangie Bergum & Gillian Lemermeyer - 2005 - Ethics and Behavior 15 (3):197 – 212.
    The moral distress of psychologists working in psychiatric and mental health care settings was explored in an interdisciplinary, hermeneutic phenomenological study situated at the University of Alberta, Canada. Moral distress is the state experienced when moral choices and actions are thwarted by constraints. Psychologists described specific incidents in which they felt their integrity had been compromised by such factors as institutional and interinstitutional demands, team conflicts, and interdisciplinary disputes. They described dealing with the resulting moral distress by such means as (...)
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  • Moral Distress and the Contemporary Plight of Health Professionals.Wendy Austin - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (1):27-38.
    Once a term used primarily by moral philosophers, “moral distress” is increasingly used by health professionals to name experiences of frustration and failure in fulfilling moral obligations inherent to their fiduciary relationship with the public. Although such challenges have always been present, as has discord regarding the right thing to do in particular situations, there is a radical change in the degree and intensity of moral distress being expressed. Has the plight of professionals in healthcare practice changed? “Plight” encompasses not (...)
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  • Pre-Reflective Ethical Know-How.Nigel DeSouza - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):279-294.
    In recent years there has been growing attention paid to a kind of human action or activity which does not issue from a process of reflection and deliberation and which is described as, e.g., ‘engaged coping’, ‘unreflective action’, and ‘flow’. Hubert Dreyfus, one of its key proponents, has developed a phenomenology of expertise which he has applied to ethics in order to account for ‘everyday ongoing ethical coping’ or ‘ethical expertise’. This article addresses the shortcomings of this approach by examining (...)
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  • Moral Complexities of Student Question-Asking in Classroom Practice.Stephen C. Yanchar & Susan P. Gong - 2020 - Phenomenology and Practice 15 (2):73-99.
    Prior research on student question-asking has primarily been conducted from a cognitive, epistemological standpoint. In contrast, we present a hermeneutic-phenomenological investigation that emphasizes the moral-practical context in which question-asking functions as a situated way of being in the midst of practice. More particularly, we present a hermeneutic study of student question-asking in a graduate seminar on design theory. The study offers a unique moral-practical perspective on this commonly studied phenomenon. Our analysis yielded four themes regarding the moral-practical intricacies of question-asking (...)
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  • Ethics and International Politics: A Response.Fred Dallmayr - 2011 - Journal of International Political Theory 7 (2):252-263.
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  • Relationality and Commitment: Ethics and Ontology in Heidegger's Aristotle.Nicolai Krejberg Knudsen - 2019 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 50 (4):337-357.
    ABSTRACTThis article discusses the tension between social relationality and self-relationality central to Heidegger's ontology of Dasein and the possible ways of reconciling this tension. Arguing t...
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  • Temporal Finitude and Finitude of Possibility: The Double Meaning of Death in Being and Time.Havi Carel - 2007 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (4):541 – 556.
    The confusion surrounding Heidegger's account of death in Being and Time has led to severe criticisms, some of which dismiss his analysis as incoherent and obtuse. I argue that Heidegger's critics err by equating Heidegger's concept of death with our ordinary concept. As I show, Heidegger's concept of death is not the same as the ordinary meaning of the term, namely, the event that ends life. But nor does this concept merely denote the finitude of Dasein's possibilities or the groundlessness (...)
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  • Social Phenomenology, Mass-Society and the Individual in Hegel and Heidegger.Matthew Rukgaber - 2017 - Hegel Bulletin 38 (1):129-149.
    This article argues that Hegel’s dialectic of wealth and power in the stage of social development called ‘culture’ (Bildung) reveals that even in moments of profound social alienation, Spirit (Geist)—the labor of constructing identity and freedom— remains. This stands in sharp contrast to Heidegger’s theory of alienation and Dasein’s ‘publicity’ (Offentlichkeit), which paints modern social existence as a profound threat to the very ‘Being’ and ‘possibilities’ of human life. The supposed threats of inauthenticity and mass existence are, from a Hegelian (...)
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  • Globalisation of Law: The Effect of Globalisation on the Domestic Interpretation of Law.Paresh Kathrani - 2009 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 116 (2):115-129.
    The law consists of both internal and external rules, but in both cases they regulate the behaviour of the subjects towards each other. This can be viewed from a phenomenological perspective in the sense that people have a drive to make sense of their world, and the rules that are developed essentially enable them to relate to the world in this way. If anything interferes with this drive, then it causes peoples’ existential upset. That is why the state both enforces (...)
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