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  1. “What the Patient Wants…”: Lay Attitudes Towards End-of-Life Decisions in Germany and Israel.Julia Inthorn, Silke Schicktanz, Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty & Aviad Raz - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (3):329-340.
    National legislation, as well as arguments of experts, in Germany and Israel represent opposite regulatory approaches and positions in bioethical debates concerning end-of-life care. This study analyzes how these positions are mirrored in the attitudes of laypeople and influenced by the religious views and personal experiences of those affected. We qualitatively analyzed eight focus groups in Germany and Israel in which laypeople were asked to discuss similar scenarios involving the withholding or withdrawing of treatment, physician-assisted suicide, and euthanasia. In both (...)
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  • “I Don’T Need My Patients’ Opinion to Withdraw Treatment”: Patient Preferences at the End-of-Life and Physician Attitudes Towards Advance Directives in England and France.Ruth Horn - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (3):425-435.
    This paper presents the results of a qualitative interview study exploring English and French physicians’ moral perspectives and attitudes towards end-of-life decisions when patients lack capacity to make decisions for themselves. The paper aims to examine the importance physicians from different contexts accord to patient preferences and to explore the role of advance directives in each context. The interviews focus on problems that emerge when deciding to withdraw/-hold life-sustaining treatment from both conscious and unconscious patients; decision-making procedures and the participation (...)
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  • Advance Directives in English and French Law: Different Concepts, Different Values, Different Societies. [REVIEW]Ruth Judith Horn - 2012 - Health Care Analysis (1):1-14.
    In Western societies advance directives are widely recognised as important means to extend patient self-determination under circumstances of incapacity. Following other countries, England and France have adopted legislation aiming to clarify the legal status of advance directives. In this paper, I will explore similarities and differences in both sets of legislation, the arguments employed in the respective debates and the socio-political structures on which these differences are based. The comparison highlights how different legislations express different concepts emphasising different values accorded (...)
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  • Solidarity and Autonomy: Two Conflicting Values in English and French Health Care and Bioethics Debates?Marie Gaille & Ruth Horn - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (6):441-446.
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  • The Right to a Self-Determined Death as Expression of the Right to Freedom of Personal Development: The German Constitutional Court Takes a Clear Stand on Assisted Suicide.Ruth Horn - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (6):416-417.
    On 26 February 2020, the German Constitutional Court rejected a law from 2015 that prohibited any form of ‘business-like’ assisted suicide as unconstitutional. The landmark ruling of the highest federal court emphasised the high priority given to the rights of autonomy and free personal development, both of which constitute the principle of human dignity, the first principle of the German constitution. The ruling echoes particularities of post-war Germany’s end-of-life debate focusing on patient self-determination while rejecting any discussion of active assistance (...)
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  • The ‘French Exception’: The Right to Continuous Deep Sedation at the End of Life.Ruth Horn - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (3):204-205.
    In 2016, a law came into force in France granting terminally ill patients the right to continuous deep sedation until death. This right was proposed as an alternative to euthanasia and presented as the ‘French response’ to problems at the end of life. The law draws a distinction between CDS and euthanasia and other forms of sympton control at the end of life. France is the first country in the world to legislate on CDS. This short report describes the particular (...)
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  • Institutional Aspects of the Ethical Debate on Euthanasia. A Communicational Perspective.Mihaela Frunza & Sandu Frunza - 2013 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 12 (34):19-36.
    Although euthanasia is seen as the problem of the individual will and as one’s right to privacy, to a better quality of life or to a dignified death, it has major institutional implications. They are closely related to the juridical system, to the way of understanding state involvement in protecting the individuals and respecting their freedoms, to the institutional system of health care, to the government rules that establish social, political or professional practices. The public debate around the topics related (...)
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