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  1. Body Ecology and Emersive Exploration of Self: The Case of Extreme Adventurers.Ana Zimmermann & Bernard Andrieu - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 15 (4):481-494.
    Body ecology by cosmosis refers to the experience of immersion, or the incorporation of the elements of nature through a body practice, leisure or sport. In this article, we propose comprehensive u...
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  • ‘Richness in Ends, Simpleness in Means!’ on Arne Naess’s Version of Deep Ecological Friluftsliv and Its Implications for Outdoor Activities.Gunnar Breivik - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 15 (3):417-434.
    The increasing global warming and the loss of biodiversity should concern us all. Some feel that outdoor activities, which take place in natural surroundings, should have a special obligation to ch...
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  • Challenging Fitness Ideology: Why an Adventurous Approach to Physical Activity is Better for Well-Being.Moira Howes - 2016 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (2):132-147.
    In this paper, I argue that adventurous approaches to physical activity can contribute more to well-being than approaches that have been shaped by fitness ideology. To defend this claim, I draw on work in philosophy and psychology concerning internal goods and intrinsic motivation, respectively. This work shows that motivating ourselves intrinsically and cultivating the internal goods of physical activity can contribute significantly to well-being. Unfortunately, the discourse and images associated with fitness culture tend to undermine intrinsic motivation and the cultivation (...)
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  • Should Kids Play (American) Football?Patrick Findler - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (3):443-462.
    In recent years, Pop Warner, the world’s largest youth football organization, has seen its numbers decline. This decline is due to concerns about new research establishing a link between football and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Hundreds of thousands of parents are now struggling with a difficult ethical issue: should kids play football? Since parents have an obligation to help children develop the capacities required for autonomous choice, the risks posed by football establish a strong presumption against allowing (...)
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  • Skiing and its Discontents: Assessing the Turist Experience From a Psychoanalytical, a Neuroscientific and a Sport Philosophical Perspective.Hub Zwart - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):323-338.
    This article addresses the question whether skiing as a nature sport enables practitioners to develop a rapport with nature, or rather estranges and insulates them from their mountainous ambiance. To address this question, I analyse a recent skiing movie from a psychoanalytical perspective and from a neuro-scientific perspective. I conclude that Jean-Paul Sartre’s classical but egocentric account of his skiing experiences disavows the technicity involved in contemporary skiing as a sportive practice for the affluent masses, which actually represents an urbanisation (...)
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  • What Would a Deep Ecological Sport Look Like? The Example of Arne Naess.Gunnar Breivik - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (1):63-81.
    ABSTRACTSince the 1960s environmental problems have increasingly been on the agenda in Western countries. Global warming and climate change have increased concerns among scientists, politicians and the general population. While both elite sport and mass sport are part of the consumer culture that leads to ecological problems, sport philosophers, with few exceptions, have not discussed what an ecologically acceptable sport would look like. My goal in this article is to present a radical model of ecological sport based on Arne Naess’s (...)
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  • Nature Sports.Kevin J. Krein - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (2):193-208.
    Sports such as surfing, mountaineering, and backcountry skiing are often grouped together. But what exactly it is that they share, and the implications of their common characteristics, have not been explained clearly. I refer to such sports as ‘nature sports’ and argue that they share a fundamental structure in which human beings and features of the natural world are brought together. The principal claim I make is that nature sports are those sports in which a particular natural feature, or combination (...)
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  • 9—Reflections on a Katana – The Japanese Pursuit of Performative Mastery.Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (4):455-502.
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  • Nature Sports.Kevin J. Krein - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (2):193-208.
    Sports such as surfing, mountaineering, and backcountry skiing are often grouped together. But what exactly it is that they share, and the implications of their common characteristics, have not been explained clearly. I refer to such sports as ‘nature sports’ and argue that they share a fundamental structure in which human beings and features of the natural world are brought together. The principal claim I make is that nature sports are those sports in which a particular natural feature, or combination (...)
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  • Safe Danger – On the Experience of Challenge, Adventure and Risk in Education.Irena Martínková & Jim Parry - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):75-91.
    This article reconsiders the presence and value of danger in outdoor and adventurous activities and sports in safety-conscious societies, especially in relation to the education of children and youth. Based on an original analysis of the relation between the concepts of ‘risk’ and ‘danger’, we offer an account of the relation between challenge, adventure, risk and danger, and emphasise the importance of teaching risk recognition, risk assessment, risk management and risk avoidance to children and youth, without the necessity of exposing (...)
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