Results for 'Moira Howes'

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Moira Howes
Trent University
  1.  30
    The Epistemology of Anger in Argumentation.Moira Howes & Catherine Hundleby - 2018 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 5 (2):229-254.
    While anger can derail argumentation, it can also help arguers and audiences to reason together in argumentation. Anger can provide information about premises, biases, goals, discussants, and depth of disagreement that people might otherwise fail to recognize or prematurely dismiss. Anger can also enhance the salience of certain premises and underscore the importance of related inferences. For these reasons, we claim that anger can serve as an epistemic resource in argumentation.
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  2. Moîra, Aión, Khrónos y la Noción de “Zeitlichkeit” En Sein Und Zeit. La Posibilidad de Un Espacio Hermenéutico.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2010 - Ontology Studies 10:199-207.
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  3.  29
    Duelo, de Guimarães Rosa: moira em interface com a violência do sertão.Fabrício Lemos da Costa & Maria Elizabeth Bueno de Godoy - 2018 - Opinães: Revista de Literatura Brasileira 13:210-222.
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  4. Anaxagorae Homoeomeria.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2015 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 36:141-147.
    Aristotle introduced in the history of the reception of Anaxagoras the term “homoiomerous.” This word refers to substances whose parts are similar to each other and to the whole. Although Aristotle’s explanations can be puzzling, the term “homoiomerous” may explain an authentic aspect of Anaxagoras’ doctrine reflected in the fragments of his work. Perhaps one should find a specific meaning for the term “homoiomerous” in Anaxagoras, somewhat different from the one present in Aristotle. This requires a review of the sense (...)
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  5.  18
    La noción de homeomería en Anaxágoras.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2018 - In Konstantinos Boudouris (ed.), Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy. Athens: Greek Philosophical Society. pp. 65-69.
    Aristotle introduced in the history of the reception of Anaxagoras the term ‘homoiomerous’. This word refers to substances whose parts are similar to each other and to the whole. Although Aristotle’s explanations can be puzzling, the term ‘homoiomerous’ may explain an authentic aspect of Anaxagoras’ doctrine reflected in the fragments of his work. Perhaps one should find a specific meaning for the term ‘homoiomerous’ in Anaxagoras, somewhat different from the one present in Aristotle. This requires a review of the sense (...)
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  6.  41
    From Nomos to Hegung: Sovereignty and the Laws of War in Schmitt’s International Order.Johanna Jacques - 2015 - The Modern Law Review 78 (3):411-430.
    Carl Schmitt's notion of nomos is commonly regarded as the international equivalent to the national sovereign's decision on the exception. But can concrete spatial order alone turn a constellation of forces into an international order? This article looks at Schmitt's work The Nomos of the Earth and proposes that it is the process of bracketing war called Hegung which takes the place of the sovereign in the international order Schmitt describes. Beginning from an analysis of nomos, the ordering function of (...)
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  7.  18
    Hegel, the Author and Authority in Sophocles’ Antigone.William E. Conklin - 1997 - In Leslie G. Rubin (ed.), Justice vs. Law in Greek Political Thought. Rowman & Littlefield,. pp. 129-51.
    Abstract: William Conklin takes on Hegel’s interpretation of Sophocles’ Antigone in this essay. Hegel asked what makes human laws human and what makes divine laws divine? After outlining Hegel’s interpretation of Antigone in the light of this issue, Conklin argues that we must address what makes human law law? and what makes divine law law? Taking his cue from Michel Foucault’s “What is an Author?”, the key to understanding Sophocles’ Antigone and Hegel’s interpretation to it, according to Conklin, is the (...)
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