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  1. Ethical Aspects of Vulnerability in Research.Elisabeth Weisser-Lohmann - 2012 - Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):157-162.
    In connection with research on humans, the term “vulnerability” is only appropriate to identify the special need for protection of certain sections of the population and individuals, if this term refers to the additional risk of certain groups of subjects. Authors who focus on the additional risk suffering of a subject group when defining vulnerability succeed in considering the specific worthiness of protection in a context-sensitive way. The attempt to define the risk–benefit assessment for vulnerable subject groups on a binding (...)
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  • The concept of vulnerability in medical ethics and philosophy.Joachim Boldt - 2019 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 14 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundHealthcare is permeated by phenomena of vulnerability and their ethical significance. Nonetheless, application of this concept in healthcare ethics today is largely confined to clinical research. Approaches that further elaborate the concept in order to make it suitable for healthcare as a whole thus deserve renewed attention.MethodsConceptual analysis.ResultsTaking up the task to make the concept of vulnerability suitable for healthcare ethics as a whole involves two challenges. Firstly, starting from the concept as it used in research ethics, a more detailed (...)
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  • The Clinical Investigator-Subject Relationship: A Contextual Approach.David B. Resnik - 2009 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 4:16-.
    BackgroundThe nature of the relationship between a clinical investigator and a research subject has generated considerable debate because the investigator occupies two distinct roles: clinician and scientist. As a clinician, the investigator has duties to provide the patient with optimal care and undivided loyalty. As a scientist, the investigator has duties to follow the rules, procedures and methods described in the protocol.Results and conclusionIn this article, I present a contextual approach to the investigator-subject relationship. The extent of the investigator's duty (...)
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  • Research in Disaster Settings: A Systematic Qualitative Review of Ethical Guidelines.Signe Mezinska, Péter Kakuk, Goran Mijaljica, Marcin Waligóra & Dónal P. O’Mathúna - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):62.
    Conducting research during or in the aftermath of disasters poses many specific practical and ethical challenges. This is particularly the case with research involving human subjects. The extraordinary circumstances of research conducted in disaster settings require appropriate regulations to ensure the protection of human participants. The goal of this study is to systematically and qualitatively review the existing ethical guidelines for disaster research by using the constant comparative method. We performed a systematic qualitative review of disaster research ethics guidelines to (...)
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  • Can Our Understanding of Informed Consent Be Strengthened Using the Idea of Cluster Concepts?Wayne Xavier Shandera - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):679-682.
    Informed consent is thought to exist as a well-defined entity. Altered concepts of patient autonomy, differential cultural understanding of the entity, and the failure of clients to distinguish between research and clinical ethics, and various hierarchical cultural views of informed consent all suggest that alterations may be needed in the traditional concept. By using the methodology outlined by Gasking in which he defines the idea of “cluster concepts,” one may be able to enlarge the definition and augment the understanding of (...)
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  • Body Matters: Rethinking the Ethical Acceptability of Non-Beneficial Clinical Research with Children.Eva De Clercq, Domnita Oana Badarau, Katharina M. Ruhe & Tenzin Wangmo - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (3):421-431.
    The involvement of children in non-beneficial clinical research is extremely important for improving pediatric care, but its ethical acceptability is still disputed. Therefore, various pro-research justifications have been proposed throughout the years. The present essay aims at contributing to the on-going discussion surrounding children’s participation in non-beneficial clinical research. Building on Wendler’s ‘contribution to a valuable project’ justification, but going beyond a risk/benefit analysis, it articulates a pro-research argument which appeals to a phenomenological view on the body and vulnerability. It (...)
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  • Do We Have a Moral Responsibility to Compensate for Vulnerable Groups? A Discussion on the Right to Health for LGBT People.Perihan Elif Ekmekci - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (3):335-341.
    Vulnerability is a broad concept widely addressed in recent scholarly literature. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people are among the vulnerable populations with significant disadvantages related to health and the social determinants of health. Medical ethics discourse tackles vulnerability from philosophical and political perspectives. LGBT people experience several disadvantages from both perspectives. This article aims to justify the right to health for LGBT people and their particular claims regarding healthcare because they belong to a vulnerable group. Rawls’ theory of justice (...)
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  • The Perils of Protection: Vulnerability and Women in Clinical Research.Toby Schonfeld - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (3):189-206.
    Subpart B of 45 Code of Federal Regulations Part 46 (CFR) identifies the criteria according to which research involving pregnant women, human fetuses, and neonates can be conducted ethically in the United States. As such, pregnant women and fetuses fall into a category requiring “additional protections,” often referred to as “vulnerable populations.” The CFR does not define vulnerability, but merely gives examples of vulnerable groups by pointing to different categories of potential research subjects needing additional protections. In this paper, I (...)
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  • „Wir wissen es alle, nur sprechen wir es nie aus.“: Institutionalisierte Uninformiertheit als Bedingung von Vulnerabilität beim Klonen und Organspende in Never Let Me Go.Solveig Lena Hansen & Sabine Wöhlke - 2015 - Ethik in der Medizin 27 (1):23-34.
    ZusammenfassungIm Spielfilm Never Let Me Go werden Klone als vulnerable und heteronome Individuen dargestellt, die zur anonymen Organspende gezwungen werden. In diesem Beitrag wird die Darstellung dieser Figuren in ihrer individuellen Entwicklung und gesellschaftlichen Sozialisation unter der Frage untersucht, welche Bezüge sich zu bioethischen Aspekten ergeben. Die Klone befinden sich in einer Situation der „privilegierten Deprivation“: Aus Sicht der Zuschauer sind sie sozial benachteiligt und können sich nicht zu komplett autonomen Wesen entwickeln, aber aus ihrer eigenen Perspektive sind sie im (...)
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  • Auf der Anderen Seite der KameraOn the Other Side of the Camera.Sayani Mitra & Solveig Lena Hansen - 2015 - Ethik in der Medizin 27 (1):69-80.
    ZusammenfassungDie Verbreitung kommerzieller Leihmutterschaft und ihr wachsender globaler Markt hat zu einer breiten Diskussion sowohl unter Wissenschaftlern als auch unter Aktivisten geführt. In diesem Aufsatz eröffnen wir durch die Auseinandersetzung mit einem Dokumentarfilm ethische Fragen, die mit der transnationalen indischen Leihmutterschaft in Verbindung stehen. Über den filmisch präsentierten Alltag von Leihmüttern wird deutlich, dass der Diskurs über kommerzielle Leihmutterschaft einer sensiblen Kontextualisierung für den spezifischen indischen Kontext bedarf. Die Perspektive von Surabhi Sharma bereichert die Diskussion, da sie den Zusammenhang von (...)
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  • Vulnerability, Health, and Illness.Robyn Bluhm - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):147-161.
    It seems clear that being sick makes people vulnerable. Not only can even relatively mild, transient illnesses such as colds or flus serve as an unpleasant reminder of the vulnerability of the usual state of health that many of us are fortunate enough to enjoy, but more serious, chronic conditions can force individuals to adapt—or even abandon—life plans or projects, and can also alter their self-conception. Yet philosophical theories of health and disease do not discuss vulnerability, nor does it have (...)
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  • Vulnerability Identified in Clinical Practice: A Qualitative Analysis.Laura Sossauer, Mélinée Schindler & Samia Hurst - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-10.
    Although it is the moral duty of physicians to protect vulnerable patients, there are no data on how vulnerability is perceived in clinical practice. This study explores how physicians classify someone as “vulnerable”. Thirty-three physicians were initially questioned about resource allocation problems in their work. The results of these interviews were examined with qualitative study software to identify characteristics associated with vulnerability in patients. Data were conceptualized, classified and cross-linked to highlight the major determinants of vulnerability. The findings revealed the (...)
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  • Why Physicians Ought to Lie for Their Patients.Nicolas Tavaglione & Samia A. Hurst - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):4-12.
    Sometimes physicians lie to third-party payers in order to grant their patients treatment they would otherwise not receive. This strategy, commonly known as gaming the system, is generally condemned for three reasons. First, it may hurt the patient for the sake of whom gaming was intended. Second, it may hurt other patients. Third, it offends contractual and distributive justice. Hence, gaming is considered to be immoral behavior. This article is an attempt to show that, on the contrary, gaming may sometimes (...)
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  • Psychosis, Vulnerability, and the Moral Significance of Biomedical Innovation in Psychiatry. Why Ethicists Should Join Efforts.Paolo Corsico - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
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  • Research Ethics and International Epidemic Response: The Case of Ebola and Marburg Hemorrhagic Fevers.Philippe Calain, Nathalie Fiore, Marc Poncin & Samia A. Hurst - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (1):7-29.
    Institute for Biomedical Ethics, Geneva University Medical School * Corresponding author: Médecins Sans Frontières (OCG), rue de Lausanne 78, CH-1211 Geneva 21, Switzerland. Tel.: +41 (0)22 849 89 29; Fax: +41 (0)22 849 84 88; Email: philippe_calain{at}hotmail.com ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Outbreaks of filovirus (Ebola and Marburg) hemorrhagic fevers in Africa are typically the theater of rescue activities involving international experts and agencies tasked with reinforcing national authorities in clinical management, biological diagnosis, sanitation, (...)
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  • Instrumentalist Analyses of the Functions of Ethics Concept-Principles: A Proposal for Synergetic Empirical and Conceptual Enrichment.Eric Racine, M. Ariel Cascio, Marjorie Montreuil & Aline Bogossian - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (4):253-278.
    Bioethics has made a compelling case for the role of experience and empirical research in ethics. This may explain why the movement for empirical ethics has such a firm grounding in bioethics. However, the theoretical framework according to which empirical research contributes to ethics—and the specific role it can or should play—remains manifold and unclear. In this paper, we build from pragmatic theory stressing the importance of experience and outcomes in establishing the meaning of ethics concepts. We then propose three (...)
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  • Vulnerability of Pregnant Women in Clinical Research.Indira S. E. van der Zande, Rieke van der Graaf, Martijn A. Oudijk & Johannes J. M. van Delden - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (10):657-663.
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  • CQ Sources/Bibliography.Bette Anton - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):348-350.
    These CQ Sources were compiled by Bette Anton.
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  • The 50th Anniversary of the Declaration of Helsinki: Progress but Many Remaining Challenges.J. Millum - 2013 - Journal of the American Medical Association 310 (20):2143-44.
    Since 1964, through 7 revisions, the World Medical Association’s Declaration of Helsinki has stood as an important statement regarding the ethical principles guiding medical research with human participants. It is consulted by ethics review committees, funders, researchers, and research participants. It has been incorporated into national legislation and is routinely invoked to ascertain the ethical appropriateness of clinical trials. There is much to praise about the revision process and the latest revision, which coincides with the declaration’s 50th anniversary. Nevertheless, the (...)
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  • Ethical Issues Raised by Cluster Randomised Trials Conducted in Low-Resource Settings: Identifying Gaps in the Ottawa Statement Through an Analysis of the PURE Malawi Trial.Tiwonge K. Mtande, Charles Weijer, Mina C. Hosseinipour, Monica Taljaard, Mitch Matoga, Cory E. Goldstein, Billy Nyambalo & Nora E. Rosenberg - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):388-393.
    The increasing use of cluster randomised trials in low-resource settings raises unique ethical issues. The Ottawa Statement on the Ethical Design and Conduct of Cluster Randomised Trials is the first international ethical guidance document specific to cluster trials, but it is unknown if it adequately addresses issues in low-resource settings. In this paper, we seek to identify any gaps in the Ottawa Statement relevant to cluster trials conducted in low-resource settings. Our method is to analyse a prototypical cluster trial conducted (...)
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  • Denying Assisted Dying Where Death is Not ‘Reasonably Foreseeable’: Intolerable Overgeneralization in Canadian End-of-Life Law.Kevin Reel - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique 1 (3).
    The recent change in Canadian law to allow access to medical assistance in dying restricts eligibility, among its other criteria, to those for whom “natural death has become reasonably foreseeable.” A recent review of certain aspects of the law examined the evidence pertaining to extending access to assisted dying in three particular request situations currently denied: requests by mature minors, advance requests, and requests where mental illness is the sole underlying medical condition [1]. The requirement for this review was included (...)
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  • 'Vulnerability', an Interesting Concept for Public Health: The Case of Older Persons.Florencia Luna - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):180-194.
    Traditional accounts of vulnerability tend to label entire populations as vulnerable. This approach is of limited utility. Instead, this article utilizes a layered approach to vulnerability, identifying multiple vulnerabilities that older people experience. It focuses on distinguishing the different layers of vulnerability that may be experienced by the elderly in middle-income countries of Latin America. In doing so, I show how the layered approach to vulnerability functions, and demonstrate why it is more interesting and useful than the traditional approach. The (...)
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  • Vulnerability: Too Vague and Too Broad?Doris Schroeder & Eugenijus Gefenas - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (2):113.
    Imagine you are walking down a city street. It is windy and raining. Amidst the bustle you see a young woman. She sits under a railway bridge, hardly protected from the rain and holds a woolen hat containing a small number of coins. You can see that she trembles from the cold. Or imagine seeing an old woman walking in the street at dusk, clutching her bag with one hand and a walking stick with the other. A group of male (...)
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  • Ethical Questions Identified in a Study of Local and Expatriate Responders’ Perspectives of Vulnerability in the 2010 Haiti Earthquake.Evelyne Durocher, Ryoa Chung, Christiane Rochon, Jean-Hugues Henrys, Catherine Olivier & Matthew Hunt - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (9):613-617.
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  • Conditions of Care: Migration, Vulnerability, and Individual Autonomy.Christine Straehle - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):122.
    International migration has a female face in the beginning of the twenty-first century; since at least 1990, a total of 49 percent of international migrants have been women (UN 2008).1 Many women relocate in pursuit of goals that they can’t realize in their countries of origin, and many women move on their own to developed countries as caregivers to the very old or the very young, as nurses to attend to the sick in hospitals, and as domestic workers.2 How should (...)
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  • How Are Pregnant Women Vulnerable Research Participants?Verina Wild - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):82-104.
    Despite the attempts to promote the inclusion of pregnant women in clinical research, this group is still widely excluded and thus hindered in benefiting from medical progress (Lyerly, Little, and Faden 2009). There are two interconnected reasons why pregnant women continue to be excluded from clinical trials. First, the traditional background assumptions associated with pregnancy, pregnant women, and the fetus still involve a harmful separation of woman and fetus that in some cases leads to an unbalanced prioritization of fetal needs. (...)
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  • A Global Ethics Approach to Vulnerability.Ruth Macklin - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):64-81.
    In exploring the concept of vulnerability, we do not begin with a blank slate. In research involving human subjects, ethics guidelines typically provide a rough definition of the concept. For example, the commentary on Guideline 13 in the International Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects, issued by the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS), says that "vulnerable persons are those who are relatively (or absolutely) incapable of protecting their own interests. More formally, they may have insufficient (...)
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  • Why Bioethics Needs a Concept of Vulnerability.Wendy Rogers, Catriona Mackenzie & Susan Dodds - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):11-38.
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  • Vulnerability and Exploitation in a Globalized World.Agomoni Ganguli Mitra & Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):91-102.
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  • Vulnerability.Thiago Cunha & Volnei Garrafa - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (2):197-208.
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  • Turning the Tables.Karen Wright & Doris Schroeder - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (2):219-227.
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  • A Matter of Heart: Beyond Informed Consent.Haavi Morreim - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):18-20.
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  • Instrumentalist Analyses of the Functions of Health Ethics Concepts and Principles: Methodological Guideposts.Eric Racine, M. Ariel Cascio & Aline Bogossian - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):16-18.
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  • Two Kinds of To-Kind Benefits and Other Reasons Why Shared Vulnerability Can Keep Clinical Studies Ethical.Nir Eyal - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (12):22-24.
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  • Ethical Review of Health Systems Research: Vulnerability and the Need for Philosophy in Research Ethics.Rebecca Bamford - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (2):38-39.
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  • Vulnerability as a Concept for Health Systems Research.Margaret Meek Lange - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (2):41-43.
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  • Medical Scholarships and the Social Determinants of Health.Stuart Rennie - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (5):38-39.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 5, Page 38-39, May 2012.
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  • Beyond the Framework.Marianne L. Burda - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (1):11 - 13.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 1, Page 11-13, January 2012.
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  • Interventions and Persons.Samia A. Hurst - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (1):10 - 11.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 1, Page 10-11, January 2012.
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  • A Step Toward Pluralist Fairness.Samia A. Hurst - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):46-47.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 12, Page 46-47, December 2011.
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  • CQ Sources/Bibliography.Bette Anton - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (2):155-158.
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  • Health Without Care? Vulnerability, Medical Brain Drain, and Health Worker Responsibilities in Underserved Contexts.Yusuf Yuksekdag - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (1):17-32.
    There is a consensus that the effects of medical brain drain, especially in the Sub-Saharan African countries, ought to be perceived as more than a simple misfortune. Temporary restrictions on the emigration of health workers from the region is one of the already existing policy measures to tackle the issue—while such a restrictive measure brings about the need for quite a justificatory work. A recent normative contribution to the debate by Gillian Brock provides a fruitful starting point. In the first (...)
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  • Respect for Human Vulnerability: The Emergence of a New Principle in Bioethics.Henk ten Have - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):395-408.
    Vulnerability has become a popular though controversial topic in bioethics, notably since 2000. As a result, a common body of knowledge has emerged distinguishing between different types of vulnerability, criticizing the categorization of populations as vulnerable, and questioning the practical implications. It is argued that two perspectives on vulnerability, i.e., the philosophical and political, pose challenges to contemporary bioethics discourse: they re-examine the significance of human agency, the primacy of the individual person, and the negativity of vulnerability. As a phenomenon (...)
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  • Abuses and Apologies: Irresponsible Conduct of Human Subjects Research in Latin America.Julie M. Aultman - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):353-368.
    This paper explores the vulnerability of Latin American human subjects, and how their vulnerability is ignored due to the complexities and inconsistencies of oversight committees and institutional policies. Secondly, the concept of apology is examined and its meaning to victims of past research abuses.
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  • Vulnerability as a Regulatory Category in Human Subject Research.Carl H. Coleman - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):12-18.
    This article examines and critiques the use of the term “vulnerability” in U.S. and international regulations and guidelines on research ethics. After concluding that the term is currently used in multiple, often inconsistent, senses, it calls on regulators to differentiate between three distinct types of vulnerability: “consent-based vulnerability,”“risk-based vulnerability,” and “justice-based vulnerability.”.
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  • Abuses and Apologies: Irresponsible Conduct of Human Subjects Research in Latin America.Julie M. Aultman - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):353-368.
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  • Vulnerability as a Regulatory Category in Human Subject Research.Carl H. Coleman - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):12-18.
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  • What If Medical Graduates Are Right?Samia A. Hurst - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (5):37-38.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 5, Page 37-38, May 2012.
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  • Simplicity as Progress: Implications for Fairness in Research With Human Participants.Samia A. Hurst - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (2):40-41.
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  • Vulnerability and Exploitation in a Globalized World.Agomoni Ganguli Mitra & Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):91-102.
    Concerns arising from global sociopolitical differences, and increasing economic and health disparities, have brought new considerations to the field of bioethics, both in terms of applications and to foundational concepts such as exploitation and vulnerability.In this paper, we aim to contribute to the discourse on exploitation and vulnerability in a way that reflects such global changes. We will explore the link between vulnerability and exploitation, and argue that exploitation can be understood as taking advantage of vulnerabilities, provided we recognize that (...)
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