Switch to: References

Citations of:

The paradox of morality: An interview with Emmanuel Levinas

In Robert Bernasconi & David Wood (eds.), The Provocation of Levinas: Rethinking the Other. Routledge (1988)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Equality of the Gaze: The Animal Stares Back in Chris Marker's Films.Kierran Argent Horner - 2016 - Film-Philosophy 20 (2-3):235-249.
    This article considers a selection of Chris Marker's films in the context of noted differences between Emmanuel Levinas's and Jacques Derrida's positions on the animal as Other, the potential for the animal face. Derrida (2008) himself argues that Levinas ‘did not make the animal anything like a focus of interrogation within his work’ (p. 105). Statements such as this about Levinas's ethics seem to make his position clear. In contrast, Derrida's thinking on the matter of the animal, and in particular (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Feeding the Hungry Other: Levinas, Breastfeeding, and the Politics of Hunger.Robyn Lee - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (2):259-274.
    Breastfeeding has become a subject of moral concern as its benefits have become well known. Encouraging mothers to breastfeed has been the goal of extensive public health promotion efforts. Emmanuel Levinas makes absolute responsibility to the Other central to his ethics, with giving food to the Other the paradigmatic ethical act. However, Levinas also provides an important critique of the autonomous individual who is taken for granted by breastfeeding promotion efforts. I argue that the ethical obligation to feed the hungry (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • ‘The Passion of Israel’: The True Israel According to Levinas, or Judaism ‘as a Category of Being’.Michael Fagenblat - 2015 - Sophia 54 (3):297-320.
    Across four decades of writing, Levinas repeatedly referred to the Holocaust as ‘the Passion of Israel at Auschwitz’. This deliberately Christological interpretation of the Holocaust raises questions about the respective roles of Judaism and Christianity in Levinas’ thought and seems at odds with his well-known view that suffering is ‘useless’. Basing my interpretation on the journals Levinas wrote as a prisoner of war and a radio talk he delivered in September 1945, I argue that his philosophical project is best understood (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Facing Animals: A Relational, Other-Oriented Approach to Moral Standing.Mark Coeckelbergh & David J. Gunkel - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (5):715-733.
    In this essay we reflect critically on how animal ethics, and in particular thinking about moral standing, is currently configured. Starting from the work of two influential “analytic” thinkers in this field, Peter Singer and Tom Regan, we examine some basic assumptions shared by these positions and demonstrate their conceptual failings—ones that have, despite efforts to the contrary, the general effect of marginalizing and excluding others. Inspired by the so-called “continental” philosophical tradition , we then argue that what is needed (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • What Is (Feminist) Philosophy?Rosalyn Diprose - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):115-132.
    What makes us think, and what makes us think as feminists? In seeking to answer these questions, this paper draws on both Deleuze and Guattari's account of the creation of concepts, and feminist thought on feminist thinking, before suggesting with Levinas that our relation to ideas is primarily affective. Via further engagement with Levinas, I argue that it is the relation to the other which provokes and produces thought; models of autonomous theorizing are thereby supplanted by the teaching of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Push, Pull, and Reverse: Self-Interest, Responsibility, and the Global Health Care Worker Shortage. [REVIEW]Katherine E. Kirby & Patricia Siplon - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (2):152-176.
    The world is suffering from a dearth of health care workers, and sub-Saharan Africa, an area of great need, is experiencing the worst shortage. Developed countries are making the problem worse by luring health care workers away from the countries that need them most, while developing countries do not have the resources to stem the flow or even replace those lost. Postmodern philosopher Emmanuel Levinas offers a unique ethical framework that is helpful in assessing both the irresponsibility inherent in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Expressive Vulnerabilities: Language and the Non-Human.Joe Larios - 2020 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 28 (5):662-676.
    Emmanuel Levinas’s work seemingly places a great emphasis on language leading some commentators towards a Kantian reading of him where moral consideration would be based on the moral patient’s capacity for reason with language functioning as a proxy for this. Although this reading is possible, a closer look at Levinas’s descriptions of language reveal that its defining characteristic is not reason but the capacity to express beyond any thematized contents we would give to the Other. This expressivity (which Levinas calls (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • From existential alterity to ethical reciprocity: Beauvoir’s alternative to Levinas.Ellie Anderson - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (2):171-189.
    While Simone de Beauvoir’s theory of alterity has been the topic of much discussion within Beauvoir scholarship, feminist theory, and social and political philosophy, it has not commonly been a reference point for those working within ethics. However, Beauvoir develops a novel view that those concerned with the ethical import of respect for others should consider seriously, especially those working within the Levinasian tradition. I claim that Beauvoir distinguishes between two forms of otherness: namely, existential alterity and sociopolitical alterity. While (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Art of Useless Suffering.Andrew Edgar - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):95-405.
    The purpose of this paper is to explore the role that modernism in the arts might have in articulating the uselessness and incomprehensibility of physical and mental suffering. It is argued that the experience of illness is frequently resistant to interpretation, and as such, it will be suggested, to conventional forms of artistic expression and communication. Conventional narratives, and other beautiful or conventionally expressive aesthetic structures, that presuppose the possibility and desirability of an harmonious and meaningful resolution to conflicts and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Messianism’s Contribution to Political Philosophy: Peace and War in Levinas’s Totality and Infinity.Hanoch Ben-Pazi - 2017 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 81 (3):291-313.
    This article examines the impact of messianic thought on political philosophy in the theory of philosopher Emmanuel Levinas. Levinas’s work enables us to consider the political not only in terms of contemplation of the tension between the political and the ethical and of the ethical limits of politics but as an attempt to create ethical political thought. Discussion of the tension between the political and the ethical intensifies in wartime and in the context of militaristic thinking. At the same time, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Value of Being Wild: A Phenomenological Approach to Wildlife Conservation.Adam Cruise - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Stellenbosch
    Given that one-million species are currently threatened with extinction and that humans are undermining the entire natural infrastructure on which our modern world depends (IPBES, 2019), this dissertation will show that there is a need to provide an alternative approach to wildlife conservation, one that avoids anthropocentrism and wildlife valuation on an instrumental basis to provide meaningful and tangible success for both wildlife conservation and human well-being in an inclusive way. In this sense, The Value of Being Wild will showcase (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Is the Other Radically ‘Other’? A Critical Reconstruction of Levinas’ Ethics.Bob Plant - 2012 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (9):977-995.
    Many Levinasians are prone to merely assert or presuppose that the Other is ‘radically Other’, and that such Otherness is of patent ethical significance. But building ethics into the very concept of ‘the Other’ seems question-begging. What then, if not mere Otherness, might motivate Levinasian responsibility? In the following discussion I argue that this can best be answered by reading Levinas as a post-Holocaust thinker, preoccupied with how one’s simply being-here constitutes a ‘usurpation of spaces belonging to the other’. Then, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Welcoming Dogs: Levinas and 'the Animal' Question.Bob Plant - 2011 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (1):49-71.
    According to Levinas, the history of western philosophy has routinely ‘assimilated every Other into the Same’. More concretely stated, philosophers have neglected the ethical significance of other human beings in their vulnerable, embodied singularity. What is striking about Levinas’ recasting of ethics as ‘first philosophy’ is his own relative disregard for non-human animals. In this article I will do two interrelated things: (1) situate Levinas’ (at least partial) exclusion of the non-human animal in the context of his markedly bleak conception (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Individuation, the Mass and Farm Animals.Henry Buller - 2013 - Theory, Culture and Society 30 (7-8):155-175.
    The singular ‘farm’ is increasingly a place of ever-greater multitudes, a deceptive and porous whole that is, in so many ways, very much less than the sum of its constituent parts. What might stand as a seemingly fixed entity or unit is, in reality, a constant flow and passage of multiple life and individual lives. To borrow from Heraclitus’ attributed aphorism, you can never really go into the same farm twice. Yet farms are, arguably, amongst the most defining sites of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Le Flair Animal: Levinas and the Possibility of Animal Friendship.Lisa Guenther - 2007 - PhaenEx 2 (2):216-238.
    In Otherwise than Being, Levinas writes that the alterity of the Other escapes “le flair animal,” or the animal’s sense of smell. This paper puts pressure on the strong human-animal distinction that Levinas makes by considering the possibility that, while non-human animals may not respond to the alterity of the Other in the way that Levinas describes as responsibility, animal sensibility plays a key role in a relation to Others that Levinas does not discuss at length: friendship. This approach to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Invisible Other.Christopher Ketcham - 2018 - Marcel Studies 3 (1):17-39.
    This paper brings Gabriel Marcel and Emmanuel Levinas into dialogue through a consideration of the notion of the spirit of abstraction in Marcel and the notion of the infinitely different other in Levinas. We abstract meaning from Mona Lisa‘s smile from her physical portrait. It is appropriate to abstract from the baby‘s sound whether he or she seems to be happy or sad, but it is when we begin to abstract humans from their humanity that the spirit of abstraction is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Infinite Responsibility in the Bedpan: Response Ethics, Care Ethics, and the Phenomenology of Caregiving.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (4):779-794.
    Drawing upon the practice of caregiving and the insights of feminist care ethics, I offer a phenomenology of caregiving through the work of Eva Feder Kittay and Emmanuel Lévinas. I argue that caregiving is a material dialectic of embodied response involving moments of leveling, attention, and interruption. In this light, the Levinasian opposition between responding to another's singularity and leveling it via parity-based principles is belied in the experience of care. Contra much of response ethics’ and care ethics’ respective literatures, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Problem of Non-Human Animals in Levinasian Ethics and a Possible Corrective.Beril İdemen Sözmen - 2015 - Dialogue 54 (4):769-791.
    Animals in Emmanuel Levinas’ ethics can neither respond to the ethical demand, nor can they be the Other from whom the demand emanates. Levinas’ characterisation of the Other as human seems to be incompatible with his description of the Other as infinitely transcendent and of the face as refusing to be contained. A corrective can be found in Martin Buber’s two-dimensional account of the encounter. Buber widens the scope of entities with which morally demanding encounters are possible. Complementing the Levinasian (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Self, Other, God: 20thCentury Jewish Philosophy.Tamra Wright - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:149-169.
    Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig and Emmanuel Levinas are three of the most prominent Jewish philosophers of the 20thcentury. This paper looks at the different understandings each author offers of intersubjectivity and authentic self-hood and questions the extent to which for each author God plays a role in interpersonal relationships.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What is (Feminist) Philosophy?Rosalyn Diprose - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):115-132.
    : What makes us think, and what makes us think as feminists? In seeking to answer these questions, this paper draws on both Deleuze and Guattari's account of the creation of concepts, and feminist thought on feminist thinking, before suggesting with Levinas that our relation to ideas is primarily affective. Via further engagement with Levinas, I argue that it is the relation to the other which provokes and produces thought; models of autonomous theorizing are thereby supplanted by the teaching of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • An Other Face of Ethics in Levinas.Barbara Jane Davy - 2007 - Ethics and the Environment 12 (1):39-66.
    : The main threads of Emmanuel Levinas's theory of ethics, developed in his philosophical works, Totality and Infinity (1969), and Otherwise than Being or Beyond Essence (1998), instruct that ethics require transcendence of being and nature, which he describes in terms of a transcendence of animality to the human. This apparent devaluation of the nonhuman would seem to preclude the development of Levinasian environmental ethics. However, a deconstructive reading of Levinas recognizes a subtext that interrupts the main threads of his (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • La Inevitabilidad de Lo Dicho.Juan Carlos Aguirre García - 2019 - Trans/Form/Ação 42 (4):81-98.
    Resumen: El propósito de este artículo es exponer la tesis levinasiana de la inevitabilidad de lo dicho, teniendo como trasfondo algunas cuestiones epistemológicas que suscita. Para esto, se comienza presentando la contraposición que establece Levinas entre verdad del desvelamiento y verdad del testimonio, destacando sus diferencias más radicales. Posteriormente, teniendo la subjetividad como hilo conductor, se reconstruye el camino que relacionaría ambos tipos de verdad, mostrando cómo la tesis de la inevitabilidad de lo dicho adquiere relevancia en las discusiones epistemológicas. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • To Trust the Liar: Løgstrup and Levinas on Ethics, War, and Openness.Patrick Stokes - 2020 - The Monist 103 (1):102-116.
    Despite their many similarities, one apparent difference between the ethics of K.E. Løgstrup and Emmanuel Levinas concerns trust: Levinas does not analyse trust as a morally significant phenomenon, whereas Løgstrup makes it a central component of his moral phenomenology. This paper argues that an analysis of Løgstrupian trust nonetheless reveals at least three important commonalities between Levinas and Løgstrup’s moral projects: an understanding of war and ethics as metaphysical opposites; an emphasis on openness to the other as something that transcends (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • In the Neighbourhood of Uncertainty : Poststructuralisms and Environmental Education.Joy Hardy - unknown
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • ‘Bringing Me More Than I Contain …’: Discourse, Subjectivity and the Scene of Teaching in Totality and Infinity.Anna Strhan - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (3):411–430.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Lost Dog.H. Peter Steeves - 2005 - Between the Species 13 (5):5.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • AWOL at Vung Tau Beach: Photography as Epistolic Dialogue.Isaac Douglas Brown - unknown
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Levinas, Bureaucracy, and the Ethics of School Leadership.Andrew Pendola - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (14):1528-1540.
    Given present criticisms of contemporary education and leadership practices, this article investigates the ways in which the basic concepts of state freedom and bureaucracy stifle ethics and social justice in educational leadership practices through the philosophical framework of Emmanuel Levinas. By investigating Levinas’ ‘an-archy’, the definition of ethics and justice in school leadership can be reframed towards responsibility to otherness rather than individual freedom. The anarchical ethic of pure responsibility to the Other suggests that educational leaders should prioritize specific acts (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • "More Than All the Others": Meditation on Responsibility.Martin Matuštík - 2007 - Critical Horizons 8 (1):47-60.
    This essay examines one aspect of the wide-ranging philosophical background of the intellectual and dissident movement for human rights in one-time communist Czechoslovakia. I shall meditate on Jan Patočka 's finite responsibility, Derrida's aporetic emphasis on the infinite dimension of responsibility, and Lévinasian-Dostoyevskyan ethico-existential variations on in/finite responsibility. Havel alludes to hyperbolic ethics in a parenthetical remark on the birth of "Charta 77", the Manifesto for Human Rights in Czechoslovakia. The question before us is this: which dimension of responsibility appears (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Bobby Between Deleuze and Levinas, or Ethics Becoming-Animal.Max Hantel - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (2):105 - 126.
    (2013). BOBBY BETWEEN DELEUZE AND LEVINAS, OR ETHICS BECOMING-ANIMAL. Angelaki: Vol. 18, No. 2, pp. 105-126.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Levinas and Our Moral Responsibility Toward Other Animals.Peter Atterton - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (6):633 - 649.
    Abstract In this essay I show that while Levinas himself was clearly reluctant to extend to nonhuman animals the same kind of moral consideration he gave to humans, his ethics of alterity is one of the best equipped to mount a strong challenge to the traditional view of animals as beings of limited, if any, moral status. I argue that the logic of Levinas's own arguments concerning the otherness of the Other militates against interpreting ethics exclusively in terms of human (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Virtual Alterity and the Reformatting of Ethics.David Gunkel & Debra Hawhee - 2003 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (3-4):173-193.
    This article seeks to reconsider how traditional notions of ethics-ethics that privilege reason, truth, meaning, and a fixed conception of "the human"-are upended by digital technology, cybernetics, and virtual reality. We argue that prevailing ethical systems are incompatible with the way technology refigures the concepts and practices of identity, meaning, truth, and finally, communication. The article examines how both ethics and technology repurpose the liberal humanist subject even as they render such a subject untenable. Such an impasse reformats the question (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Theodicy: The Solution to the Problem of Evil, or Part of the Problem?Nick Trakakis - 2008 - Sophia 47 (2):161-191.
    Theodicy, the enterprise of searching for greater goods that might plausibly justify God’s permission of evil, is often criticized on the grounds that the project has systematically failed to unearth any such goods. But theodicists also face a deeper challenge, one that places under question the very attempt to look for any morally sufficient reasons God might have for creating a world littered with evil. This ‘anti-theodical’ view argues that theists (and non-theists) ought to reject, primarily for moral reasons, the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Following the Animal-to-Come.Robert Briggs - 2019 - Derrida Today 12 (1):20-40.
    Jacques Derrida's The Animal That Therefore I Am presents a sustained reflection on a concept of ‘the animal’ that has underpinned the work of much of the philosophical tradition. Based on a series of lectures originally presented in 1997 Derrida's speculation on the question of the animal was thus written at a time when Derrida's thought was often turned to the motif of ‘to-come’ such that one may wonder at the apparent evasion, both in Derrida's text and in its subsequent (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reterritorializing Subjectivity.Brian Schroeder - 2012 - Research in Phenomenology 42 (2):251-266.
    Abstract The philosophies of Deleuze, Guattari and Levinas are taken up in an effort to advance the ethical, political, and technological implications of how we interpret, inhabit, and territorialize the Earth. The difference between their views on the relation between immanence and transcendence and their respective analyses of the face and faciality are brought to bear in addressing the questions of ethics, politics, and values in relation to the constitution and liberation, or resingularization, of subjectivity. The contemporary world has produced (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • An Encounter with ‘Sayings’ of Curriculum: Levinas and the Formalisation of Infants’ Learning.Sandra Cheeseman, Frances Press & Jennifer Sumsion - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (8):822-832.
    Increased global attention to early childhood education and care in the past two decades has intensified attention on the education of infants and assessment of their learning in education policy. This interest is particularly evident in the focus upon infants in the early childhood curriculum frameworks developed in recent years in many countries. To date, there has been little examination of implications of this policy/curriculum emphasis in relation to its possible implications for how infants are understood. In this article, using (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Etinių Aporijų Prasmė Ir / Ar Beprasmybė: Derrida Pokalbis Su Levinu.Giedrė Tatarūnaitė - 2016 - Logos: A Journal, of Religion, Philosophy Comparative Cultural Studies and Art 89:193-206.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reply to Fagan: Hanging God at Auschwitz: The Necessity of a Solitary Encounter with the Other as the Genesis of Levinasian Ethics.Amanda Loumanksy - 2009 - Contemporary Political Theory 8 (1):23-43.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Conciliating Cognition and Consciousness: The Perceptual Foundations of Clinical Reasoning.Hillel D. Braude - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):945-950.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Wretchedness of Belief: Wittgenstein on Guilt, Religion, and Recompense.Bob Plant - 2004 - Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):449 - 476.
    In "Culture and Value" Wittgenstein remarks that the truly "religious man" thinks himself to be, not merely "imperfect" or "ill," but wholly "wretched." While such sentiments are of obvious biographical interest, in this paper I show why they are also worthy of serious philosophical attention. Although the influence of Wittgenstein's thinking on the philosophy of religion is often judged negatively (as, for example, leading to quietist and/or fideist-relativist conclusions) I argue that the distinctly ethical conception of religion (specifically Christianity) that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Knowing Waste: Towards an Inhuman Epistemology.Myra J. Hird - 2012 - Social Epistemology 26 (3-4):453-469.
    Ten years after the publication of the special issue of Social Epistemology on feminist epistemology, this paper explores recent feminist interest in the inhuman. Feminist science studies, cultural studies, philosophy and environmental studies all build on the important work feminist epistemology has done to bring to the fore questions of feminist empiricism, situated knowledges and knowing as an intersubjective activity. Current research in feminist theory is expanding this epistemological horizon to consider the possibility of an inhuman epistemology. This paper explores (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Thinking with Suffering.Iain Wilkinson - 2001 - Cultural Values 5 (4):421-444.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Feyerabend, Rorty, Mouffe and Keane: On Realising Democracy.Thomas Clarke - 1999 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (3):81-118.
    This article examines a peculiarity dating from Classical times, namely, that democracy may be achieved, in practice, independently of and prior to its articulation as theory. This peculiarity has implications for the way in which the history of democratic theory is understood, and also for the place of the democratic theorist in society. Paul Feyerabend, Richard Rorty, Chantal Mouffe and John Keane are theorists of democracy, but they all depart, first, from the commitment to the universal truth?claims that underpin other (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark