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  1. Preventing conscientious objection in medicine from running amok: a defense of reasonable accommodation.Mark R. Wicclair - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (6):539-564.
    A US Department of Health and Human Services Final Rule, Protecting Statutory Conscience Rights in Health Care, and a proposed bill in the British House of Lords, the Conscientious Objection Bill, may well warrant a concern that—to borrow a phrase Daniel Callahan applied to self-determination—conscientious objection in health care has “run amok.” Insofar as there are no significant constraints or limitations on accommodation, both rules endorse an approach that is aptly designated “conscience absolutism.” There are two common strategies to counter (...)
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  • Might a Conscience Clause Be Used for Non-Moral or Prejudiced Reasons?Zuzana Deans - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (2):76-77.
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  • Conscientious Objection and Healthcare in the UK: Why Tribunals Are Not the Answer.Christopher Cowley - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (2):69-72.
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  • Conscientious Objection to Intentional Killing: An Argument for Toleration.Bjørn K. Myskja & Morten Magelssen - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):82.
    In the debate on conscientious objection in healthcare, proponents of conscience rights often point to the imperative to protect the health professional’s moral integrity. Their opponents hold that the moral integrity argument alone can at most justify accommodation of conscientious objectors as a “moral courtesy”, as the argument is insufficient to establish a general moral right to accommodation, let alone a legal right. This text draws on political philosophy in order to argue for a legal right to accommodation. The moral (...)
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  • Conscientious Objection in Medicine: Making it Public.Nir Ben-Moshe - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-21.
    The literature on conscientious objection in medicine presents two key problems that remain unresolved: Which conscientious objections in medicine are justified, if it is not feasible for individual medical practitioners to conclusively demonstrate the genuineness or reasonableness of their objections? How does one respect both medical practitioners’ claims of conscience and patients’ interests, without leaving practitioners complicit in perceived or actual wrongdoing? My aim in this paper is to offer a new framework for conscientious objections in medicine, which, by bringing (...)
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  • Duty and Dilemma: Perioperative Nurses Hiding an Objection to Participate in Organ Procurement Surgery.Zaneta Smith - 2017 - Nursing Inquiry 24 (3):e12173.
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  • Is Conscientious Objection Incompatible with Healthcare Professionalism?Mary Neal & Sara Fovargue - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (3):221-235.
    Is conscientious objection necessarily incompatible with the role and duties of a healthcare professional? An influential minority of writers on the subject think that it is. Here, we outline...
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  • Uzasadnienie Sprzeciwu Sumienia: Lekarze, Poborowi I Żołnierze.Tomasz Żuradzki - 2016 - Diametros 47:98-128.
    I will argue that physicians have an ethical obligation to justify their conscientious objection and the most reliable interpretation of the Polish legal framework claims that conscientious objection is permissible only when the justification shows the genuineness of the judgment of conscience that is not based on false beliefs and arises from a moral norm that has a high rank. I will demonstrate that the dogma accepted in the Polish doctrine that the reasons that lie behind conscientious objection in medicine (...)
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  • Reasons, Reasonability and Establishing Conscientious Objector Status in Medicine.Robert F. Card - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (4):222-225.
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  • Conscientious Objection in Healthcare: Why Tribunals Might Be the Answer.Jonathan A. Hughes - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (4):213-217.
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  • Reasonability and Conscientious Objection in Medicine: A Reply to Marsh and an Elaboration of the Reason‐Giving Requirement.Robert F. Card - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (6):320-326.
    In this paper I defend the Reasonability View: the position that medical professionals seeking a conscientious exemption must state reasons in support of their objection and allow those reasons to be subject to evaluation. Recently, this view has been criticized by Jason Marsh as proposing a standard that is either too difficult to meet or too easy to satisfy. First, I defend the Reasonability View from this proposed dilemma. Then, I develop this view by presenting and explaining some of the (...)
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  • Conscientious Objection and the Limits of Dialogue.Christopher Cowley - 2016 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 42 (10):1004-1014.
    In Kimberly Brownlee’s book, Conscience and Conviction, she argues that Thomas More’s paradigmatic ‘personal objection’ successfully meets the 4 conditions of her ‘Communicative Principle’. In this article I want to challenge Brownlee’s ‘universality’ condition and the ‘dialogical’ condition by focusing on a counter-example of a British GP conscientiously objecting to authorizing an abortion. I argue that such an objection can be morally admirable, even though the GP is not politically active, even though she is not open-minded to the possibility that (...)
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  • Conscientious Objection by Health Care Professionals.Gry Wester - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (7):427-437.
    Certain health care services and goods, although legal and often generally accepted in a society, are by some considered morally problematic. Debates on conscientious objection in health care try to resolve whether and when physicians, nurses and pharmacists should be allowed to refuse to provide medical services and goods because of their ethical or religious beliefs. These debates have most often focused on issues such as how to balance the interests of patients and health care professionals, and the compatibility of (...)
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