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  1. Text, Commentary, Annotation: Some Reflections on the Philosophical Genre. [REVIEW]Karin Preisendanz - 2008 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (5-6):599-618.
    This essay is an attempt to analyze, classify and illustrate different scholarly approaches to the Sanskrit philosophical commentaries as reflected in some influential and especially thoughtful studies of Indian philosophy; at the same time it highlights some specific features involving commentary and annotation in general, drawing from results of studies on commentaries conducted in other disciplines and fields, such as Classical and Medieval Studies, Theology, and Early English Literature. In the field of South Asian Studies, philosophical commentaries may be assessed (...)
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  • The Problem of Foundation in Early Nyāya and in Navya-Nyāya.Eberhard Guhe - 2015 - History and Philosophy of Logic 36 (2):97-113.
    The evaluation of arguments was not the sole concern of logicians in ancient India. Early Nyāya and the later Navya-Nyāya provide an interesting example of the interaction between logic and ontology. In their attempt to develop a kind of property-location logic Naiyāyikas had to consider what kind of restrictions they should impose on the residence relation between a property and its locus. Can we admit circular residence relations or infinitely descending chains of properties, each depending on its successor as its (...)
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  • Why Is There Nothing Rather Than Something?: An Essay in the Comparative Metaphysic of Nonbeing.Purushottama Bilimoria - 2012 - Sophia 51 (4):509-530.
    This essay in the comparative metaphysic of nothingness begins by pondering why Leibniz thought of the converse question as the preeminent one. In Eastern philosophical thought, like the numeral 'zero' (śūnya) that Indian mathematicians first discovered, nothingness as non-being looms large and serves as the first quiver on the imponderables they seem to have encountered (e.g., 'In the beginning was neither non-being nor being: what was there, bottomless deep?' RgVeda X.129). The concept of non-being and its permutations of nothing, negation, (...)
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  • Indian Cognitivism and the Phenomenology of Conceptualization.Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad - 2011 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):277-296.
    We perform conceptual acts throughout our daily lives; we are always judging others, guessing their intentions, agreeing or opposing their views and so on. These conceptual acts have phenomenological as well as formal richness. This paper attempts to correct the imbalance between the phenomenal and formal approaches to conceptualization by claiming that we need to shift from the usual dichotomies of cognitive science and epistemology such as the formal/empirical and the rationalist/empiricist divides—to a view of conceptualization grounded in the Indian (...)
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  • The Sanskrit of Science.Frits Staal - 1995 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 23 (1):73-127.
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  • Reference and Existence in Nyāya and Buddhist Logic.Bimal Krishna Matilal - 1970 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 1 (1):83-110.
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