Switch to: References

Citations of:

Response to Graham Macdonald

In Cynthia Macdonald & Graham Macdonald (eds.), Mcdowell and His Critics. Blackwell. pp. 235--239 (2006)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Kant and the Problem of Recognition: Freedom, Transcendental Idealism, and the Third-Person.Joe Saunders - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (2):164-182.
    Kant wants to show that freedom is possible in the face of natural necessity. Transcendental idealism is his solution, which locates freedom outside of nature. I accept that this makes freedom possible, but object that it precludes the recognition of other rational agents. In making this case, I trace some of the history of Kant’s thoughts on freedom. In several of his earlier works, he argues that we are aware of our own activity. He later abandons this approach, as he (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Space of Motivations.Donnchadh O’Conaill - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (3):440-455.
    The distinction between the space of reasons and the realm of law captures two familiar ways of making events intelligible, by reference to reasons or to natural laws, respectively. I describe a third way of making events intelligible, by explaining them in terms of an agent’s being motivated to do certain things. Explanations of this sort do not involve appealing to reasons for which the agent acts, nor to natural laws under which the event falls. To explain an event in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Naturalism and the Space of Reasons in Mind and World.T. H. Ho - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (1):49-62.
    This paper aims to show that many criticisms of McDowell’s naturalism of second nature are based on what I call ‘the orthodox interpretation’ of McDowell’s naturalism. The orthodox interpretation is, however, a misinterpretation, which results from the fact that the phrase ‘the space of reasons’ is used equivocally by McDowell in Mind and World. Failing to distinguish two senses of ‘the space of reasons’, I argue that the orthodox interpretation renders McDowell’s naturalism inconsistent with McDowell’s Hegelian thesis that the conceptual (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Naturalism and Inference: On the Need for a Theory of Material Inference.Dabay Thomas - 2016 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    My research centers on analytic pragmatist approaches to intentionality. One goal that defenders of such approaches set for themselves is to be able to provide a naturalistically sound account of intentionality without being pejoratively scientistic. Many critics argue that this is an unattainable goal, and I begin my dissertation by framing in neutral terms what I take to be the core of these criticsâ objection. I call this the Pincer Objection, and while surveying the works of four prominent analytic pragmatistsâDonald (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Chapter 4 Naturalisms, Materialisms and the Ideal World.Sheila Webb - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 54 (6):1546-1564.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Chapter 8 The ‘Layer‐Cake’ Versus ‘Transformative’ Conceptions of Human Mindedness.Sheila Webb - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 54 (6):1615-1628.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Chapter 8: The ‘Layer‐Cake’ Versus ‘Transformative’ Conceptions of Human Mindedness.Sheila Webb - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophy of Education.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Sobre a possibilidade de pensarmos o mundo: o debate entre John McDowell e Donald Davidson.Marco Aurelio Sousa Alves - 2008 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
    The thesis evaluates a contemporary debate concerning the very possibility of thinking about the world. In the first chapter, McDowell's critique of Davidson is presented, focusing on the coherentism defended by the latter. The critique of the myth of the given (as it appears in Sellars and Wittgenstein), as well as the necessity of a minimal empiricism (which McDowell finds in Quine and Kant), lead to an oscillation in contemporary thinking between two equally unsatisfactory ways of understanding the empirical content (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark