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  1. Firms, States, and Democracy: A Qualified Defense of the Parallel Case Argument.Iñigo González Ricoy - 2014 - Law, Ethics and Philosophy 2.
    The paper discusses the structure, applications, and plausibility of the much-used parallel-case argument for workplace democracy. The argument rests on an analogy between firms and states according to which the justification of democracy in the state implies its justification in the workplace. The contribution of the paper is threefold. First, the argument is illustrated by applying it to two usual objections to workplace democracy, namely, that employees lack the expertise required to run a firm and that only capital suppliers should (...)
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  • Freedom, Republicanism, and Workplace Democracy.Keith Breen - 2015 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 18 (4):470-485.
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  • Recognitive Arguments for Workplace Democracy.Onni Hirvonen & Keith Breen - 2020 - Constellations 27 (4):716-731.
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  • The Basic Liberties: An Essay on Analytical Specification.Stephen K. McLeod & Attila Tanyi - forthcoming - European Journal of Political Theory.
    We characterize, more precisely than before, what Rawls calls the “analytical” method of drawing up a list of basic liberties. This method employs one or more general conditions that, under any just social order whatever, putative entitlements must meet for them to be among the basic liberties encompassed, within some just social order, by Rawls’s first principle of justice (i.e., the liberty principle). We argue that the general conditions that feature in Rawls’s own account of the analytical method, which employ (...)
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  • Survey Article: Philosophy and Public Policy After Piketty.Martin O'Neill - 2017 - Journal of Political Philosophy 25 (3):343-375.
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  • Corporate Institutions in a Weakened Welfare State: A Rawlsian Perspective.Sandrine Blanc & Ismael Al-Amoudi - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (4):497-525.
    This paper re-examines the import of Rawls’s theory of justice for private sector institutions in the face of the decline of the welfare state. The argument is based on a Rawlsian conception of justice as the establishment of a basic structure of society that guarantees a fair distribution of primary goods. We propose that the decline of the welfare state witnessed in Western countries over the past forty years prompts a reassessment of the boundaries of the basic structure in order (...)
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  • Business Ethics and (or as) Political Philosophy.Joseph Heath, Jeffrey Moriarty & Wayne Norman - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):427-452.
    There is considerable overlap between the interests of business ethicists and those of political philosophers. Questions about the moral justifiability of the capitalist system, the basis of property rights, and the problem of inequality in the distribution of income have been of central importance in both fields. However, political philosophers have developed, especially over the past four decades, a set of tools and concepts for addressing these questions that are in many ways quite distinctive. Most business ethicists, on the other (...)
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  • Workplace Democracy, Market Competition and Republican Self-Respect.Daniel Jacob & Christian Neuhäuser - 2018 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 21 (4):927-944.
    Is it a requirement of justice to democratize private companies? This question has received renewed attention in the wake of the financial crisis, as part of a larger debate about the role of companies in society. In this article, we discuss three principled arguments for workplace democracy and show that these arguments fail to establish that all workplaces ought to be democratized. We do, however, argue that republican-minded workers must have a fair opportunity to work in a democratic company. Under (...)
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  • A Moral and Economic Critique of the New Property-Owning Democrats: On Behalf of a Rawlsian Welfare State.Kevin Vallier - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (2):283-304.
    Property-owning democracies combine the regulative and redistributive functions of the welfare state with the governmental aim of ensuring that wealth and capital are widely dispersed. John Rawls, political philosophy’s most famous property-owning democrat, argued that property-owning democracy was one of two regime types that best realized his two principles of justice, though he was notoriously vague about how a property-owning democracy’s institutions are meant to realize his principles. To compensate for this deficiency, a number of Rawlsian political philosophers have tried (...)
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  • Rawlsian Institutionalism and Business Ethics: Does It Matter Whether Corporations Are Part of the Basic Structure of Society?Brian Berkey - 2021 - Business Ethics Quarterly 31 (2):179-209.
    In this article, I aim to clarify some key issues in the ongoing debate about the relationship between Rawlsian political philosophy and business ethics. First, I discuss precisely what we ought to be asking when we consider whether corporations are part of the “basic structure of society.” I suggest that the relevant questions have been mischaracterized in much of the existing debate, and that some key distinctions have been overlooked. I then argue that although Rawlsian theory’s potential implications for business (...)
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  • Libertarian Personal Responsibility: On the Ethics, Practice, and American Politics of Personal Responsibility.Joshua Preiss - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (6):621-645.
    While libertarians affirm personal responsibility as a central moral and political value, libertarian theorists write relatively little about the theory and practice of this value. Focusing on the work of F. A. Hayek and David Schmidtz, this article identifies the core of a libertarian approach to personal responsibility and demonstrates the ways in which this approach entails a radical revision of the ethics and American politics of personal responsibility. Then, I highlight several central implications of this analysis in the American (...)
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  • Property-Owning Democracy and the Demands of Justice.Martin O'Neill & Thad Williamson - 2009 - Living Reviews in Democracy 1:1-10.
    John Rawls is arguably the most important political philosopher of the past century. His theory of justice has set the agenda for debate in mainstream political philosophy for the past forty years, and has had an important influence in economics, law, sociology, and other disciplines. However, despite the importance and popularity of Rawls's work, there is no clear picture of what a society that met Rawls's principles of justice would actually look like. This article sets out to explore that question.
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  • Basic Liberties, the Moral Powers and Workplace Democracy.Stephen K. McLeod - 2018 - Ethics, Politics and Society 1:232–261.
    The article responds to previous work, by Martin O’Neill, about the Rawlsian case for an entitlement to an element of workplace democracy. Of the three arguments for such an entitlement that O’Neill discusses, this article focuses mainly on the one he rejects (on the grounds of its having an implausible premise): the Fundamental Liberties Argument, according to which the right to an element of workplace democracy is a basic liberty. This article argues that while the argument can be improved to (...)
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  • Expanding Workers’ ‘Moral Space’: A Liberal Critique of Corporate Capitalism.Sandrine Blanc - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (4):473-488.
    This paper assesses employees’ moral agency within corporate capitalism from a politically liberal standpoint. While political liberalism has spelt out its key institutional implications at state level, it has neglected moral agency at work, assuming that a rights-based state that secures freedom of contract, free choice of occupation and a free labour market within a fair context would protect it sufficiently. Yet two features of corporate capitalism constrain employees’ moral agency: the relation of authority that forms part of the work (...)
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  • Firms and Parental Justice: Should Firms Contribute to the Cost of Parenthood and Procreation?Sandrine Blanc & Tim Meijers - forthcoming - Economics and Philosophy:1-27.
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  • Socialism.Pablo Gilabert & Martin O'Neill - 2019 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Workplace Democracy—The Recent Debate.Roberto Frega, Lisa Herzog & Christian Neuhäuser - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (4):e12574.
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  • Are Rawlsian Considerations of Corporate Governance Illiberal? A Reply to Singer.Sandrine Blanc - 2016 - Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (3):407-421.
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  • Rethinking the Very Idea of Egalitarian Markets and Corporations: Why Relationships Might Matter More Than Distribution.Pierre-Yves Néron - 2015 - Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (1):93-124.
    ABSTRACT: What kinds of markets, market regulations, and business organizations are compatible with contemporary egalitarian theories of justice? This article argues that any thoughtful answer to this question will have to draw on recent developments in political philosophy that are concerned not only with the equality of the distribution of core goods but also with the requirements for equality of status, voice, and so on, in the relations between individuals and within organizations. The dominance of theories of distributive justice in (...)
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  • Rawls on Markets and Corporate Governance.Wayne Norman - 2015 - Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (1):29-64.
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