Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Quest for Purity: Another Look at the New Wittgenstein.Martin Stokhof - 2011 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):275-294.
    This short note takes another look at the ideas proposed by the ‘New Wittgen steinians’, focusing on a feature of the discussion these ideas have generated that hitherto seems to have received comparatively little attention, viz., certain assumptions about the conception of philosophy as an intellectual enterprise, including its relation to the sciences, that seem to be adopted by both the New Wittgensteinians and (many of) their critics.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Does It Take to Climb the Ladder?Mauro Luiz Engelmann - 2018 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 59 (140):591-611.
    ABSTRACT The aim of this paper is to show that "traditional" and "resolute" interpretations have not freed the "Tractatus" from the apparent paradoxical self-defeat. I argue that these readings only give it new clothing. Hacker's "traditional" reading ends up ascribing a metaphysical conspiracy to the "Tractatus", which is incompatible with the aims of the book. The "resolute" reading of Diamond and Conant ascribes an authorial conspiracy to Wittgenstein, which contradicts his views on authorship and method. Grounded in the difficulties found (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • On Operator N and Wittgenstein’s Logical Philosophy.James R. Connelly - 2017 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 5 (4).
    In this paper, I provide a new reading of Wittgenstein’s N operator, and of its significance within his early logical philosophy. I thereby aim to resolve a longstanding scholarly controversy concerning the expressive completeness of N. Within the debate between Fogelin and Geach in particular, an apparent dilemma emerged to the effect that we must either concede Fogelin’s claim that N is expressively incomplete, or reject certain fundamental tenets within Wittgenstein’s logical philosophy. Despite their various points of disagreement, however, Fogelin (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Carnap’s Dream: Gödel, Wittgenstein, and Logical, Syntax.S. Awodey & A. W. Carus - 2007 - Synthese 159 (1):23-45.
    In Carnap’s autobiography, he tells the story how one night in January 1931, “the whole theory of language structure” in all its ramifications “came to [him] like a vision”. The shorthand manuscript he produced immediately thereafter, he says, “was the first version” of Logical Syntax of Language. This document, which has never been examined since Carnap’s death, turns out not to resemble Logical Syntax at all, at least on the surface. Wherein, then, did the momentous insight of 21 January 1931 (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Tractatus, Application and Use.Martin Stokhof & Jaap van der Does - 2020 - Open Philosophy 3 (1):770-797.
    The article argues for a contextualised reading of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus. It analyses in detail the role that use and application play in the text and how that supports a conception of transcendentality of logic that allows for contextualisation. The article identifies a tension in the text, between the requirement that sense be determinate and the contextual nature of application, and suggests that it is this tension that is a major driver of Wittgenstein’s later ideas.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Three Wittgensteins: Interpreting the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus.Thomas J. Brommage - 2008 - Dissertation,
    There are historically three main trends in understanding Wittgenstein's Tractatus. The first is the interpretation offered by the Vienna Circle. They read Wittgenstein as arguing that neither metaphysical nor normative propositions have any cognitive meaning, and thus are to be considered nonsense. This interpretation understands Wittgenstein as setting the limits of sense, and prescribing that nothing of substantive philosophical importance lies beyond that line. The second way of reading the Tractatus, which has became popular since the 1950s, is the interpretation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Truth Incorporated.Gurpreet Rattan - 2016 - Noûs 50 (2):227-258.
    What is the cognitive value of the concept of truth? What epistemic difference does the concept of truth make to those who grasp it? This paper employs a new perspective for thinking about the concept of truth and recent debates concerning it, organized around the question of the cognitive value of the concept of truth. The paper aims to defend a substantively correct and dialectically optimal account of the cognitive value of the concept of truth. This perspective is employed in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • A “Resolute” Later Wittgenstein?Genia Schönbaumsfeld - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (5):649-668.
    Abstract: “Resolute readings” initially started life as a radical new approach to Wittgenstein's early philosophy, but are now starting to take root as a way of interpreting the later writings as well—a trend exemplified by Stephen Mulhall's Wittgenstein's Private Language (2007) as well as by Phil Hutchinson's “What's the Point of Elucidation?” (2007) and Rom Harré's “Grammatical Therapy and the Third Wittgenstein” (2008). The present article shows that there are neither good philosophical nor compelling exegetical grounds for accepting a resolute (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • On the Unintelligibility of Wittgenstein's Tractatus.Cameron Hessell - 2013 - Philosophical Investigations 36 (2):113-154.
    “Resolute” readings of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus maintain that the book is divided into two parts: an intelligible “frame” and an unintelligible “body.” This article questions the validity of the “frame/body distinction” and, by extension, the resolute reading itself. It first establishes the tenability of the resolute programme as entirely dependent upon such a frame/body distinction. It then explores three possible ways the claim that the Tractatus contains such a distinction might be grounded, arguing in each case why it cannot do (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What is It Like to Be the Metaphysical Subject? An Essay on Early Wittgenstein, Our Epistemic Position, and Beyond.Konrad Werner - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):921-946.
    I argue that Ludwig Wittgenstein’s idea of the metaphysical subject sheds new light on subjective qualities of experience. In this article I draw first of all on the interpretations provided by Michael Kremer and James Conant. Subsequently, I conclude that “what is it like” means primarily “what is it like to see myself as the metaphysical subject”.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Tractarian Sätze : Instructions for Use.Jan Wawrzyniak - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (3):1209-1234.
    The main question addressed by this article is this: How should one understand the role of the sentences of the Tractatus, given Wittgenstein’s statement that they are nonsensical? I begin with a presentation of three general principles of interpretation in order to avoid answering the question in an inappropriate way. I then move on to a short presentation and commentary on a selection of readings – namely, the ineffabilist, resolute and elucidatory ones – and elaborate the answers given by advocates (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Tractarian Form as the Precursor to Forms of Life.Chon Tejedor - 2015 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 4:83-109.
    Interpreters are divided on the question of whether the phrase ‘form of life’ is used univocally in Wittgenstein’s later writings. Some univocal interpreters suggest that, for Wittgenstein, ‘form of life’ captures a uniquely biological notion: the biologically human form of life. Others suggest that it captures a cultural notion: the notion of differently enculturated forms of human life. Non-univocal interpreters, in contrast, argue that Wittgenstein does not use ‘form of life’ univocally, but that he uses it sometimes to highlight a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Hostility or Tolerance? Philosophy, Polyphony and the Novels of Thomas Pynchon.Martin Paul Eve - unknown
    This thesis undertakes a systematic, tripartite analysis of the interactions between the fiction and essays of Thomas Pynchon and the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Michel Foucault and Theodor W. Adorno, resulting in a solid set of original reference-material for those undertaking work on Pynchon and philosophy, or more generally on philosophico-literary intersections. Premised upon the notion that Pynchon's literature harbours a fundamental hostility to much systematizing philosophical thought, this work avoids a dominating imposition of philosophy, or an application of philosophical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ineffability and Nonsense.Peter Sullivan - 2003 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):195–223.
    [A. W. Moore] There are criteria of ineffability whereby, even if the concept of ineffability can never serve to modify truth, it can sometimes serve to modify other things, specifically understanding. This allows for a reappraisal of the dispute between those who adopt a traditional reading of Wittgenstein's Tractatus and those who adopt the new reading recently championed by Diamond, Conant, and others. By maintaining that what the nonsense in the Tractatus is supposed to convey is ineffable understanding, rather than (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Mysticism and Nonsense in the Tractatus.Michael Morris & Julian Dodd - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):247-276.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Aesthetic Dimension of Wittgenstein's Later Writings.William Day - 2017 - In Garry L. Hagberg (ed.), Wittgenstein on Aesthetic Understanding. pp. 3-29.
    In this essay I argue the extent to which meaning and judgment in aesthetics figures in Wittgenstein’s later conception of language, particularly in his conception of how philosophy might go about explaining the ordinary functioning of language. Following a review of some biographical and textual matters concerning Wittgenstein’s life with music, I outline the connection among (1) Wittgenstein’s discussions of philosophical clarity or perspicuity, (2) our attempts to give clarity to our aesthetic experiences by wording them, and (3) the clarifying (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • 3 Wittgenstein and the Inexpressible.Juliet Floyd - 2007 - In Alice Crary (ed.), Wittgenstein and the Moral Life: Essays in Honor of Cora Diamond. MIT Press. pp. 177-234.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Continuity of Wittgenstein's Critical Meta-Philosophy.Thomas Robert Cunningham - unknown
    This thesis investigates the continuity of Wittgenstein’s approach to, and conception of, philosophy. Part One examines the rule-following passages of the Philosophical Investigations. I argue that Wittgenstein’s remarks can only be read as interesting and coherent if we see him, as urged by prominent commentators, resisting the possibility of a certain ‘sideways-on’ perspective. There is real difficulty, however, in ascertaining what the resulting Wittgensteinian position is: whether it is position structurally analogous with Kant’s distinction between empirical realism and transcendental idealism, (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Early Wittgenstein and Modernity.Dimitris Gakis - 2015 - Intellectual History Review 25 (4):433-449.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark