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  1. Moral Ecology, Disabilities, and Human Agency.Kevin Timpe - 2019 - Res Philosophica 96 (1):17-41.
    This paper argues that human agency is not simply a function of intrinsic properties about the agent, but that agency instead depends on the ecology that the agent is in. In particular, the paper examines ways that disabilities affect agency and shows how, by paying deliberate attention to structuring the social environment around people with disabilities, we can mitigate some of the agential impact of those disabilities. The paper then argues that the impact of one’s social environment on agency isn’t (...)
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  • The Shattered Spiritual Self: A Philosophical Exploration of Religious Trauma.Michelle Panchuk - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):505-530.
    In this paper I consider what a person who finds herself religiously incapacitated ought to do. More specifically, I address people who have come to God asking for bread, but who seem to have received stones and serpents in its place. This is a manifestation of the phenomenon that I call religious trauma. My goals in this paper are twofold. First, I aim to demonstrate that, because religious trauma can be genuinely religiously incapacitating, it can result in non-culpable failure to (...)
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  • A Life Worth Living: Value and Responsibility.Audra L. Goodnight - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (2):133-149.
    Value and responsibility are two central concepts in philosophy and bioethics. The articles that comprise this issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy engage topics of moral injury, madness, transhumanism, cognitive enhancement, and the woman’s responsibility to assist her fetus. Clearly diverse in matter, these subject articles univocally present fruitful ground for engagement with contemporary questions that impact society today. The ability to cure or to enhance, to treat or to terminate through advances in medical technology are all actions (...)
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