Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Modelos interpretativos del corpus newtoniano: Tradiciones historiográficas del siglo XX.Sergio H. Orozco-Echeverri - 2007 - Estudios de Filosofía 35:227-256.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Henry More and the Development of Absolute Time.Emily Thomas - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 54:11-19.
    This paper explores the nature, development and influence of the first English account of absolute time, put forward in the mid-seventeenth century by the ‘Cambridge Platonist’ Henry More. Against claims in the literature that More does not have an account of time, this paper sets out More's evolving account and shows that it reveals the lasting influence of Plotinus. Further, this paper argues that More developed his views on time in response to his adoption of Descartes' vortex cosmology and cosmogony, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Newton's Metaphysics of Space: A “Tertium Quid” Betwixt Substantivalism and Relationism, or Merely a “God of the (Rational Mechanical) Gaps”?Edward Slowik - 2009 - Perspectives on Science 17 (4):pp. 429-456.
    This paper investigates the question of, and the degree to which, Newton’s theory of space constitutes a third-way between the traditional substantivalist and relationist ontologies, i.e., that Newton judged that space is neither a type of substance/entity nor purely a relation among such substances. A non-substantivalist reading of Newton has been famously defended by Howard Stein, among others; but, as will be demonstrated, these claims are problematic on various grounds, especially as regards Newton’s alleged rejection of the traditional substance/accident dichotomy (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Newton’s Neo-Platonic Ontology of Space.Edward Slowik - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (3):419-448.
    This paper investigates Newton’s ontology of space in order to determine its commitment, if any, to both Cambridge neo-Platonism, which posits an incorporeal basis for space, and substantivalism, which regards space as a form of substance or entity. A non-substantivalist interpretation of Newton’s theory has been famously championed by Howard Stein and Robert DiSalle, among others, while both Stein and the early work of J. E. McGuire have downplayed the influence of Cambridge neo-Platonism on various aspects of Newton’s own spatial (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Some Background to the Absolute-Relational Debate.Gordon Belot - manuscript
    Some notes discussing some of the ancient and medieval background to the absolute-relational debate. Final version appears as Appendix C in my book, Geometric Possibility.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Can the History of Mathematics Learn From Philosophy? A Case Study in Newton’s Presentation of the Calculus.R. Corby Hovis - 1989 - Philosophia Mathematica (1):35-57.
    One influential interpretation of Newton's formulation of his calculus has regarded his work as an organized, cohesive presentation, shaped primarily by technical issues and implicitly motivated by a knowledge of the form which a "finished" calculus should take. Offered as an alternative to this view is a less systematic and more realistic picture, in which both philosophical and technical considerations played a part in influencing the structure and interpretation of the calculus throughout Newton's mathematical career. This analysis sees the development (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Gravity and Newton’s Substance Counting Problem.Hylarie Kochiras - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (3):267-280.
    A striking feature of Newton’s thought is the very broad reach of his empiricism, potentially extending even to immaterial substances, including God, minds, and should one exist, a non-perceiving immaterial medium. Yet Newton is also drawn to certain metaphysical principles—most notably the principle that matter cannot act where it is not—and this second, rationalist feature of his thought is most pronounced in his struggle to discover ‘gravity’s cause’. The causal problem remains vexing, for he neither invokes primary causation, nor accepts (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Light, Pressure, and Rectilinear Propagation: Descartes' Celestial Optics and Newton's Hydrostatics.Alan E. Shapiro - 1974 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 5 (3):239.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Boyle on Science and the Mechanical Philosophy: A Reply to Chalmers.Andrew Pyle - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):171-186.
    Robert Boyle thought that his scientific achievements in pneumatics and chemistry depended on, and thus provided support for, his mechanical philosophy. In a recent article in this journal, Alan Chalmers has challenged this view. This paper consists of a reply to Chalmers on two fronts. First it tries to specify precisely what ‘the mechanical philosophy’ meant for Boyle. Then it goes on to defend, against Chalmers, the view that Boyle's science does support his natural philosophy.Keywords: Robert Boyle; Mechanical philosophy; Reductionism.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Atoms and the ‘Analogy of Nature’: Newton's Third Rule of Philosophizing.J. E. McGuire - 1970 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 1 (1):3-58.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Action and Reaction Before Newton.John L. Russell - 1976 - British Journal for the History of Science 9 (1):25-38.
    The concepts of action and reaction before Newton have received so little attention from historians that the unwary student might easily get the impression that Newton was the first to concern himself seriously with the problem. In fact, the subject had a long prehistory extending back to Aristotle and it was actively discussed by physicists during the half-century preceding the publication of Principia mathematica in 1687. Although there is no evidence that Newton himself was much influenced by the views of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Space, Atoms and Mathematical Divisibility in Newton.Andrew Janiak - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 31 (2):203-230.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Methodological Origins of Newton’s Queries.Peter R. Anstey - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):247-269.
    This paper analyses the different ways in which Isaac Newton employed queries in his writings on natural philosophy. It is argued that queries were used in three different ways by Newton and that each of these uses is best understood against the background of the role that queries played in the Baconian method that was adopted by the leading experimenters of the early Royal Society. After a discussion of the role of queries in Francis Bacon’s natural historical method, Newton’s queries (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Analogy Between Light and Sound in the History of Optics From the Ancient Greeks to Isaac Newton. Part 2†.Olivier Darrigol - 2010 - Centaurus 52 (3):206-257.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Theories of Scientific Method From Plato to Mach: A Bibliographical Review.Laurens Laudan - 1968 - History of Science 7 (1):1-63.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Gravity and Newton’s Substance Counting Problem.Hylarie Kochiras - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (3):267-280.
    A striking feature of Newton’s thought is the very broad reach of his empiricism, potentially extending even to immaterial substances, including God, minds, and should one exist, a non-perceiving immaterial medium. Yet Newton is also drawn to certain metaphysical principles—most notably the principle that matter cannot act where it is not—and this second, rationalist feature of his thought is most pronounced in his struggle to discover ‘gravity’s cause’. The causal problem remains vexing, for he neither invokes primary causation, nor accepts (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Existence, Actuality and Necessity: Newton on Space and Time.J. E. McGuire - 1978 - Annals of Science 35 (5):463-508.
    This study considers Newton's views on space and time with respect to some important ontologies of substance in his period. Specifically, it deals in a philosophico-historical manner with his conception of substance, attribute, existence, to actuality and necessity. I show how Newton links these “features” of things to his conception of God's existence with respect of infinite space and time. Moreover, I argue that his ontology of space and time cannot be understood without fully appreciating how it relates to the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations