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  1. Knowledge, Reason, and Taste: Kant's Response to Hume.Paul Guyer - 2008 - Princeton University Press.
    In this book, the first to describe and assess Hume's influence throughout Kant's philosophy, Guyer shows where Kant agrees or disagrees with Hume, and where Kant does or doesn't appear to resolve Hume's doubts.
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  • Early German Philosophy: Kant and His Predecessors.Walter Cerf - 1969 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 32 (1):122-123.
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  • Hume's Enlightenment Tract: The Unity and Purpose of an Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.Timothy M. Costelloe - 2001 - Mind 111 (441):84-88.
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  • Notes and Fragments.Immanuel Kant - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    This 2005 volume provides an extensive translation of the notes and fragments that survived Kant's death in 1804. These include marginalia, lecture notes, and sketches and drafts for his published works. They are important as an indispensable resource for understanding Kant's intellectual development and published works, casting fresh light on Kant's conception of his own philosophical methods and his relations to his predecessors, as well as on central doctrines of his work such as the theory of space, time and categories, (...)
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  • David Hume and Moses Mendelssohn.Manfred Kuehn - 1995 - Hume Studies 21 (2):197-220.
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  • Infinite Divisibility and Actual Parts in Hume’s Treatise.Thomas Holden - 2002 - Hume Studies 28 (1):3-25.
    According to a standard interpretation of Hume’s argument against infinite divisibility, Hume is raising a purely formal problem for mathematical constructions of infinite divisibility, divorced from all thought of the stuffing or filling of actual physical continua. I resist this. Hume’s argument must be understood in the context of a popular early modern account of the metaphysical status of the parts of physical quantities. This interpretation disarms the standard mathematical objections to Hume’s reasoning; I also defend it on textual and (...)
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  • Hume and Tetens.Manfred Kuehn - 1989 - Hume Studies 15 (2):365-375.
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  • What Were Kant’s Aims in the Deduction?Gary Hatfield - 2003 - Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):165-198.
    This article argues that many (often Anglophone) interpreters of the Deduction have mistakenly identified Kant's aim as vindicating ordinary knowledge of objects and as refuting Hume's (alleged) skepticism about such knowledge. Instead, the article contends that Kant's aims were primarily negative. His primary mission (in the Deduction) was not to justify application of the categories to experience, but to show that any use beyond the domain of experience could not be justified. To do this, he needed to show that their (...)
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  • Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality.Eric Watkins - 2005 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 68 (3):624-626.
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  • Hume's Enlightenment Tract: The Unity and Purpose of an Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.Stephen Buckle - 2001 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Hume's Enlightenment Tract is the first full book-length study for forty years of David Hume's Enquiry concerning Human Understanding. The Enquiry has, contrary to its author's expressed wishes, long lived in the shadow of its predecessor, A Treatise of Human Nature. Stephen Buckle presents the Enquiry in a fresh light, and aims to raise it to its rightful position in Hume's work and in the history of philosophy. He argues that the Enquiry is not, as so often assumed, a mere (...)
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  • Commentar Zu Kants Kritik der Reinen Vernunft.Hans Vaihinger - 1881 - W. Spemann.
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  • Hume and Berkeley on the Proofs of Infinite Divisibility.Robert Fogelin - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (1):47-69.
    Since both berkeley and hume are committed to the view that a line is composed of finitely many fundamental parts, They must find responses to the standard geometrical proofs of infinite divisibility. They both repeat traditional arguments intended to show that infinite divisibility leads to absurdities, E.G., That all lines would be infinite in length, That all lines would have the same length, Etc. In each case, Their arguments rest upon a misunderstanding of the concept of a limit, And thus (...)
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  • Kant's Model of Causality: Causal Powers, Laws, and Kant's Reply to Hume.Eric Watkins - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (4):449-488.
    : This paper argues that Kant's model of causality cannot consist in one temporally determinate event causing another, as Hume had thought, since such a model is inconsistent with mutual interaction, to which Kant is committed in the Third Analogy. Rather causality occurs when one substance actively exercises its causal powers according to the unchanging grounds that constitute its nature so as to determine a change of state of another substance. Because this model invokes unchanging grounds, one can understand how (...)
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  • XV. Kant Und Hume Um 1762.B. Erdmann - 1888 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 1 (2):216-230.
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  • Kant's Conception of "Hume's Problem".Manfred Kuehn - 1983 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (2):175-193.
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  • The Prolegomena and the Critiques of Pure Reason.Gary Hatfield - 2001 - In Volker Gerhardt, Rolf-Peter Horstmann & Ralph Schumacher (eds.), Kant Und Die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des IX Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 185-208.
    This chapter considers Kant's relation to Hume as Kant himself understood it when he wrote the Critique of Pure Reason and the Prolegomena. It first seeks to refine the question of Kant's relation to Hume's skepticism, and it then considers the evidence for Kant's attitude toward Hume in three works: the A Critique, Prolegomena, and B Critique. It argues that in the A Critique Kant viewed skepticism positively, as a necessary reaction to dogmatism and a spur toward critique. In his (...)
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  • Infinite Divisibility in Hume's "Treatise".A. Flew - 1967 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 22 (4):457.
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  • Aenesidemus Oder Über Die Fundamente der von Dem Herrn Prof. Reinhold in Jena Gelieferten Elementar-Philopsophie.Gottlob Ernst Schulze - 1792 - [S.N.].
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  • Hume in der Deutschen Aufklärung Umrisse Einer Rezeptionsgeschichte.Günter Gawlick & Lothar Kreimendahl - 1987
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  • Kant’s Transcendental Deduction: A Limited Defense of Hume.Manfred Kuhn - 1987 - In B. Den Ouden (ed.), Journal of Philosophy. Peter Lang. pp. 656.
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  • Kant's Early Critics: The Empiricist Critique of the Theoretical Philosophy.Brigitte Sassen (ed.) - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book, first published in 2000, offers translations of the initial critical reactions to Kant's philosophy. Also included is a selection of writings by Kant's contemporaries who took on the task of defending the critical philosophy against early attacks. The first aim of this collection is to show in detail how Kant was understood and misunderstood by his contemporaries. The second aim is to reveal the sorts of arguments that Kant and his first disciples mounted in their defense of the (...)
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  • Custom and Reason in Hume: A Kantian Reading of the First Book of the Treatise.Henry E. Allison - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    So considered, Hume is viewed as a naturalist, whose project in the first three parts of the first book of the Treatise is to provide an account of the ...
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  • Ueber Das Fundament des Philosophischen Wissens.Karl Leonhard Reinhold & Johann Michael Mauke - 1791 - Bey Johann Michael Mauke.
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  • The New Hume Debate: Revised Edition.Rupert Read & Kenneth Richman (eds.) - 2008 - Routledge.
    For decades scholars thought they knew Hume's position on the existence of causes and objects he was a sceptic. However, this received view has been thrown into question by the `new readings of Hume as a sceptical realist. For philosophers, students of philosophy and others interested in theories of causation and their history, The New Hume Debate is the first book to fully document the most influential contemporary readings of Hume's work. Throughout, the volume brings the debate beyond textual issues (...)
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