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  1. Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind.Wilfrid S. Sellars - 1956 - Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science 1:253-329.
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  • Folk Psychology is Here to Stay.Terence Horgan & James Woodward - 1985 - Philosophical Review 94 (April):197-225.
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  • Troubles with Fodor's Nativism.Jerry Samet - 1986 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 10 (1):575-594.
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  • Mental Acts: Their Content and Their Objects.Peter Thomas Geach - 1957 - London, England: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
    ACT, CONTENT, AND OBJECT THE TITLE I have chosen for this work is a mere label for a set of problems; the controversial views that have historically been ...
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  • Science Without Experience.Paul K. Feyerabend - 1969 - Journal of Philosophy 66 (November):791-795.
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  • Hegel's Science of Logic.Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (ed.) - 1929 - London, England: Humanity Books.
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  • Consciousness: The Transmutation of a Concept.Patricia S. Churchland - 1983 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 64 (January):80-95.
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  • The Unheeded Cry: Animal Consciousness, Animal Pain, and Science.Bernard E. Rollin - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    How can science teach us that animals feel no pain when our common sense observations tell us otherwise? Rollin offers a welcome insight into questions like this in The Unheeded Cry, a rare, reasonable account of the difficult and controversial issues surrounding the images of animals found in science. Widely hailed on its first appearance, the book is updated here to include recent changes in thinking and practice in this fast growing field. With anecdotes and a dose of humour, Rollin (...)
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  • Two Dogmas of Empiricism.W. Quine - 1951 - [Longmans, Green].
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  • A Treatise of Human Nature.David Hume & A. D. Lindsay - 1958 - Philosophical Quarterly 8 (33):379-380.
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  • Epiphenomenal Qualia.Frank Jackson - 1982 - Philosophical Quarterly 32 (April):127-136.
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  • In Defense of Folk Psychology.Frank Jackson & Philip Pettit - 1990 - Philosophical Studies 59 (1):31-54.
    It turned out that there was no phlogiston, no caloric fluid, and no luminiferous ether. Might it turn out that there are no beliefs and desires? Patricia and Paul Churchland say yes} We say no. In part one we give our positive argument for the existence of beliefs and desires.
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  • Beyond the Exclusively Propositional Era.William P. Bechtel & A. Abrahamson - 1990 - Synthese 82 (2):223-53.
    Contemporary epistemology has assumed that knowledge is represented in sentences or propositions. However, a variety of extensions and alternatives to this view have been proposed in other areas of investigation. We review some of these proposals, focusing on (1) Ryle's notion of knowing how and Hanson's and Kuhn's accounts of theory-laden perception in science; (2) extensions of simple propositional representations in cognitive models and artificial intelligence; (3) the debate concerning imagistic versus propositional representations in cognitive psychology; (4) recent treatments of (...)
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  • What is It Like to Be a Bat?Thomas Nagel - 1974 - Philosophical Review 83 (October):435-50.
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  • Epiphenomenal Qualia.Frank Jackson - 1982 - In John Heil (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: A Guide and Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  • Could Love Be Like a Heatwave?Janet Levin - 1986 - In John Heil (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: A Guide and Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  • Perception: Facts And Theories.Clement W. K. Mundle - 1971 - London: : Oxford University Press,.
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  • Image and Mind.Stephen M. Kosslyn - 1980 - Harvard University Press.
    The book also introduces a host of new experimental techniques and major hypotheses to guide future research.
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  • Perception, Theory, and Commitment: The New Philosophy of Science.Harold I. Brown - 1977 - Precedent.
    " --Maurice A. Finocchiaro,Isis "The best and most original aspect of the book is its overall conception.
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  • The Bounds of Sense.P. F. Strawson - 1966 - Philosophy 42 (162):379-382.
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  • Quining Qualia.Daniel C. Dennett - 1988 - In Anthony J. Marcel & E. Bisiach (eds.), [Book Chapter]. Oxford University Press.
    " Qualia " is an unfamiliar term for something that could not be more familiar to each of us: the ways things seem to us. As is so often the case with philosophical jargon, it is easier to give examples than to give a definition of the term. Look at a glass of milk at sunset; the way it looks to you--the particular, personal, subjective visual quality of the glass of milk is the quale of your visual experience at the (...)
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  • Color as a Secondary Quality.Paul A. Boghossian & J. David Velleman - 1989 - Mind 98 (January):81-103.
    Should a principle of charity be applied to the interpretation of the colour concepts exercised in visual experience? We think not. We shall argue, for one thing, that the grounds for applying a principle of charity are lacking in the case of colour concepts. More importantly, we shall argue that attempts at giving the experience of colour a charitable interpretation either fail to respect obvious features of that experience or fail to interpret it charitably, after all. Charity to visual experience (...)
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  • Observation Reconsidered.Jerry A. Fodor - 1984 - Philosophy of Science 51 (March):23-43.
    Several arguments are considered which purport to demonstrate the impossibility of theory-neutral observation. The most important of these infers the continuity of observation with theory from the presumed continuity of perception with cognition, a doctrine widely espoused in recent cognitive psychology. An alternative psychological account of the relation between cognition and perception is proposed and its epistemological consequences for the observation/theory distinction are then explored.
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  • Some Reductive Strategies in Cognitive Neurobiology.Paul M. Churchland - 1986 - Mind 95 (July):279-309.
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  • Seeing.G. J. Warnock - 1955 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 55:201-218.
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  • Insularity and the Persistence of Perceptual Illusion.Philip Cam - 1990 - Analysis 50 (4):231-5.
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  • Patterns of Discovery.Norwood R. Hanson, A. D. Ritchie & Henryk Mehlberg - 1960 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 10 (40):346-349.
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  • The Question of Animal Awareness.Donald R. Griffin - 1983 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 34 (4):399-403.
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  • Philosophy and Common Sense.Keith Campbell - 1988 - Philosophy 63 (244):161 - 174.
    This paper identifies moore's use of a carefully selected group of propositions from common sense as a touchstone for philosophical credibility, As belonging to a tradition in metaphysics which is neither ambitiously constructive nor sceptically negative, But rather acts as a "whistle-Blowing" restraint. It traces the later disappearance of any common-Sensical touchstones, Then argues that two aspects of fodor's "modularity of mind" provide a basis for the return of a modest reliance on common-Sense knowledge as a point of reference. The (...)
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  • Kant’s Theory of Form: An Essay on the Critique of Pure Reason.Robert B. Pippin - 1982 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 47 (3):515-516.
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  • The Self and its brain.K. Popper & J. Eccles - 1986 - Revista de filosofía (Chile) 27:167-171.
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  • Thought and Talk.Donald Davidson - 1975 - In Samuel D. Guttenplan (ed.), Mind and Language. Clarendon Press. pp. 1975--7.
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  • Precis of the Modularity of Mind.Jerry A. Fodor - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):1-42.
    The Modularity of Mind proposes an alternative to the or view of cognitive architecture that has dominated several decades of cognitive science. Whereas interactionism stresses the continuity of perceptual and cognitive processes, modularity theory argues for their distinctness. It is argued, in particular, that the apparent plausibility of New Look theorizing derives from the failure to distinguish between the (correct) claim that perceptual processes are inferential and the (dubious) claim that they are unencapsidated, that is, that they are arbitrarily sensitive (...)
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  • Alleged Problems in Attributing Beliefs, and Intentionality, to Animals.Richard Routley - 1981 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 24 (4):385-417.
    The ordinary attribution of intentionality to (nonhuman) animals raises serious problems for fashionable linguistic accounts of belief and of intentionality generally; and many of the alleged problems arise from such linguistic theories of mind. Another deeper source of alleged problems is the apartness thesis, that there is a significant difference in kind, with substantial moral import, between humans and other animals; for the last lines of defence of this erroneous thesis consist in making out that there are significant intentional differences. (...)
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  • Qualia and Consciousness.Sydney Shoemaker - 1991 - Mind 100 (399):507-24.
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  • The Neurobiology of Observation.Daniel Gilman - 1991 - Philosophy of Science 58 (3):496-502.
    Paul Churchland has recently argued that empirical evidence strongly suggests that perception is penetrable to the beliefs or theories held by individual perceivers (1988). While there has been much discussion of the sorts of psychological cases he presents, little has been said about his arguments from neurology. I offer a critical examination of his claim that certain efferents in the brain are evidence against perceptual encapsulation. I argue that his neurological evidence is inadequate to his philosophical goals, both by itself (...)
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  • Cognitive Basis of Language Learning in Infants.John MacNamara - 1972 - Psychological Review 79 (1):1-13.
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  • Molyneux's Question.M. J. Morgan - 1979 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 40 (2):301-303.
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  • Subjectivity.Norman Malcolm - 1988 - Philosophy 63 (April):147-60.
    In his book The View from Nowhere , Thomas Nagel says that ‘the subjectivity of consciousness is an irreducible feature of reality’ . He speaks of ‘the essential subjectivity of the mental’ , and of ‘the mind's irreducibly subjective character’ . ‘Mental concepts’, he says, refer to ‘subjective points of view and their modifications’ : The subjective features of conscious mental processes—as opposed to their physical causes and effects—cannot be captured by the purified form of thought suitable for dealing with (...)
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  • The Subjective Character of Experience.Paul G. Muscari - 1985 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 6 (4):577-97.
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  • Do Animals Have Beliefs?Stephen P. Stich - 1979 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 57 (1):15-28.
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  • Philosophy and the Scientific Image of Man.Wilfrid S. Sellars - 1962 - In Robert Colodny (ed.), Science, Perception, and Reality. Humanities Press/Ridgeview. pp. 35-78.
    The aim of philosophy, abstractly formulated, is to understand how things in the broadest possible sense of the term hang together in the broadest possible sense of the term. Under 'things in the broadest possible sense' I include such radically different items as not only 'cabbages and kings', but numbers and duties, possibilities and finger snaps, aesthetic experience and death. To achieve success in philosophy would be, to use a contemporary turn of phrase, to 'know one's way around' with respect (...)
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  • Perception.F. Jackson - 1979 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 41 (1):155-155.
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  • Constraints on Knowledge and Cognitive Development.Frank C. Keil - 1981 - Psychological Review 88 (3):197-227.
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  • Perception of the Speech Code.A. M. Liberman, F. S. Cooper, D. P. Shankweiler & M. Studdert-Kennedy - 1967 - Psychological Review 74 (6):431-461.
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  • The Legend of the Given.William S. Robinson - 1975 - In Hector-Neri Castaneda (ed.), Action, Knowledge, and Reality. Bobbs-Merrill.
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  • On Two Recent Accounts of Color.M. McGinn - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (July):316-24.
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  • Color and Illusion.C. L. Hardin - 1990 - In William G. Lycan (ed.), Mind and Cognition. Blackwell.
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