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  1. When is Diminishment a Form of Enhancement? : Rethinking the Enhancement Debate in Biomedical Ethics.Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - unknown
    The enhancement debate in neuroscience and biomedical ethics tends to focus on the augmentation of certain capacities or functions: memory, learning, attention, and the like. Typically, the point of contention is whether these augmentative enhancements should be considered permissible for individuals with no particular “medical” disadvantage along any of the dimensions of interest. Less frequently addressed in the literature, however, is the fact that sometimes the _diminishment_ of a capacity or function, under the right set of circumstances, could plausibly contribute (...)
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  • Neuroenhancement of Love and Marriage: The Chemicals Between Us. [REVIEW]Julian Savulescu & Anders Sandberg - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (1):31-44.
    This paper reviews the evolutionary history and biology of love and marriage. It examines the current and imminent possibilities of biological manipulation of lust, attraction and attachment, so called neuroenhancement of love. We examine the arguments for and against these biological interventions to influence love. We argue that biological interventions offer an important adjunct to psychosocial interventions, especially given the biological limitations inherent in human love.
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  • Anti-Love Biotechnology: Was It Not Better to Have Loved and Lost Than Never to Have Loved at All?Mirko D. Garasic - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):22-23.
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  • Natural Selection, Childrearing, and the Ethics of Marriage (and Divorce): Building a Case for the Neuroenhancement of Human Relationships. [REVIEW]Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2012 - Philosophy and Technology 25 (4):561-587.
    We argue that the fragility of contemporary marriages—and the corresponding high rates of divorce—can be explained (in large part) by a three-part mismatch: between our relationship values, our evolved psychobiological natures, and our modern social, physical, and technological environment. “Love drugs” could help address this mismatch by boosting our psychobiologies while keeping our values and our environment intact. While individual couples should be free to use pharmacological interventions to sustain and improve their romantic connection, we suggest that they may have (...)
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  • Ethically Justified, Clinically Applicable Criteria for Physician Decision-Making in Psychopharmacological Enhancement.Matthis Synofzik - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (2):89-102.
    Advances in psychopharmacology raise the prospects of enhancing neurocognitive functions of humans by improving attention, memory, or mood. While general ethical reflections on psychopharmacological enhancement have been increasingly published in the last years, ethical criteria characterizing physicians’ role in neurocognitive enhancement and guiding their decision-making still remain highly unclear. Here it will be argued that also in the medical domain the use of cognition-enhancing drugs is not intrinsically unethical and that, in fact, physicians should assume an important role in gating (...)
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  • On Good and Bad Forms of Medicalization.Erik Parens - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (1):28-35.
    The ongoing ‘enhancement’ debate pits critics of new self-shaping technologies against enthusiasts. One important thread of that debate concerns medicalization, the process whereby ‘non-medical’ problems become framed as ‘medical’ problems.In this paper I consider the charge of medicalization, which critics often level at new forms of technological self-shaping, and explain how that charge can illuminate – and obfuscate. Then, more briefly, I examine the charge of pharmacological Calvinism, which enthusiasts, in their support of technological self-shaping, often level at critics. And (...)
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  • Neuroreductionism About Sex and Love.Brian D. Earp & Julian Savulescu - unknown
    "Neuroreductionism" is the tendency to reduce complex mental phenomena to brain states, confusing correlation for physical causation. In this paper, we illustrate the dangers of this popular neuro-fallacy, by looking at an example drawn from the media: a story about "hypoactive sexual desire disorder" in women. We discuss the role of folk dualism in perpetuating such a confusion, and draw some conclusions about the role of "brain scans" in our understanding of romantic love.
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  • Amantes Sunt Amentes: Pathologizing Love and the Meaning of Suffering.Diana Aurenque & Christopher W. McDougall - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):34-36.
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  • Involuntary Exposures to Love-Enhancing or Anti-Love Agents.Gary E. Marchant & Yvonne A. Stevens - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):26-27.
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  • Anti-Love or Anti-“Lifestyle”: Historical Reflections on Reparative Therapies for Homosexuality.Lance Wahlert - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):36-38.
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  • If I Could Just Stop Loving You: Anti-Love Biotechnology and the Ethics of a Chemical Breakup.Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):3-17.
    ?Love hurts??as the saying goes?and a certain amount of pain and difficulty in intimate relationships is unavoidable. Sometimes it may even be beneficial, since adversity can lead to personal growth, self-discovery, and a range of other components of a life well-lived. But other times, love can be downright dangerous. It may bind a spouse to her domestic abuser, draw an unscrupulous adult toward sexual involvement with a child, put someone under the insidious spell of a cult leader, and even inspire (...)
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  • When Love Hurts Children: Controlling the Feelings of Minors.M. Carmela Epright & Sara Waller - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):28-29.
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  • A Thomistic Account of Anti-Love Biotechnology.Brandon Boesch - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):30-31.
    Applies a generally Thomistic framework to Earp and colleagues' (2013) discussion of anti-love biotechnology. Discusses some of the constraints that should be placed on the use of such a technology from a Thomistic perspective.
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  • An Error Theory of Biotechnology and the Ethics of Chemical Breakups: It Is the Reasons, Not the Pharmaceuticals, That Are Important in Defending Against Perilous Love.Gavin Enck - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):32-34.
    In this commentary, I offer an account of an error theory of biotechnology and apply it to Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk,Anders Sandberg, and Julian Savulescu’s (2013)ethical framework for chemical reakups.
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  • The Heart Outright: A Comment on “If I Could Just Stop Loving You”.Neil McArthur - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):24-25.
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  • Anti-Love Biotechnologies: Integrating Considerations of the Social.Kristina Gupta - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):18-19.
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  • Medicalization, Medical Necessity, and Feminist Medicine.Laura Purdy - 2001 - Bioethics 15 (3):248–261.
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  • Brave New Love: The Threat of High-Tech “Conversion” Therapy and the Bio-Oppression of Sexual Minorities.Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (1):4-12.
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  • Protecting Sexual Diversity: Rethinking the Use of Neurotechnological Interventions to Alter Sexuality.Kristina Gupta - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 3 (3):24-28.
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  • Well-Being and Enhancement.Julian Savulescu, Anders Sandberg & Guy Kahane - 2001 - In Guy Kahane, Julian Savulescu & Ruud Ter Meulen (eds.), Enhancing Human Capacities. Blackwell. pp. 3--18.
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  • Love and Other Drugs.Brian D. Earp - 2012 - Philosophy Now 91:14-17.
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  • .John Dillon - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
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  • .Julian Savulescu - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
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