Switch to: Citations

References in:

Normative and Non-normative Concepts: Paternalism and Libertarian Paternalism

In Daniel Strech, Irene Hirschberg & Georg Marckmann (eds.), Ethics in Public Health and Health Policy: Concepts, Methods, Case Studies. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 27-46 (2013)

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. The Ethics of Nudge.Luc Bovens - 2008 - In Mats J. Hansson & Till Grüne-Yanoff (eds.), Preference Change: Approaches from Philosophy, Economics and Psychology. Springer, Theory and Decision Library A. pp. 207-20.
    In their recently published book Nudge (2008) Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein (T&S) defend a position labelled as ‘libertarian paternalism’. Their thinking appeals to both the right and the left of the political spectrum, as evidenced by the bedfellows they keep on either side of the Atlantic. In the US, they have advised Barack Obama, while, in the UK, they were welcomed with open arms by the David Cameron's camp (Chakrabortty 2008). I will consider the following questions. What (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   75 citations  
  • Ethics: Nursing in asylum seeker detention in Australia: care, rights and witnessing.D. Zion, L. Briskman & B. Loff - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (9):546-551.
    The system of asylum seeker detention in Australia is one in which those seeking refuge are stripped of many of their rights, including the right to health. This presents serious ethical problems for healthcare providers working within this system. In this article we describe asylum seeker detention and analyse the role of nurses. We discuss how far an “ethics of care” and witnessing the suffering of asylum seekers can serve to improve their situation and improve ethical nursing practice.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Law, Liberty, and Morality.H. L. A. Hart - 1963 - Stanford University Press.
    This incisive book deals with the use of the criminal law to enforce morality, in particular sexual morality, a subject of particular interest and importance since the publication of the Wolfenden Report in 1957. Professor Hart first considers John Stuart Mill's famous declaration: "The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community is to prevent harm to others." During the last hundred years this doctrine has twice been sharply challenged by two great (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  • From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice.Allen Buchanan, Dan W. Brock, Norman Daniels & Daniel Wikler - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book, written by four internationally renowned bioethicists and first published in 2000, was the first systematic treatment of the fundamental ethical issues underlying the application of genetic technologies to human beings. Probing the implications of the remarkable advances in genetics, the authors ask how should these affect our understanding of distributive justice, equality of opportunity, the rights and obligations as parents, the meaning of disability, and the role of the concept of human nature in ethical theory and practice. The (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   223 citations  
  • Genetic Privacy: A Challenge to Medico-Legal Norms.Graeme Laurie - 2002 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The phenomenon of the New Genetics raises complex social problems, particularly those of privacy. This book offers ethical and legal perspectives on the questions of a right to know and not to know genetic information from the standpoint of individuals, their relatives, employers, insurers and the state. Graeme Laurie provides a unique definition of privacy, including a concept of property rights in the person, and argues for stronger legal protection of privacy in the shadow of developments in human genetics. He (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  • Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly.Norman Daniels - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book by the award-winning author of Just Healthcare, Norman Daniels develops a comprehensive theory of justice for health that answers three key questions: what is the special moral importance of health? When are health inequalities unjust? How can we meet health needs fairly when we cannot meet them all? Daniels' theory has implications for national and global health policy: can we meet health needs fairly in ageing societies? Or protect health in the workplace while respecting individual liberty? Or (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   310 citations  
  • Cost-Value Analysis in Health Care: Making Sense Out of Qalys.Erik Nord - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a comprehensive account of what it means to try to quantify health in distributing resources for health care. It examines the concept of QALYs which supposedly makes it more accurate to talk about life in terms of both quality and quantity of years lived when referring to health care policy. It offers an elegant new approach to comparing the costs and benefits of medical interventions. Cost-Utility Analysis is a method designed by economists to aid decision makers distribute (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  • Paternalism, Unconscionability Doctrine, and Accommodation.Seana Valentine Shiffrin - 2000 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 29 (3):205-250.
    The unconscionability doctrine in contract law enables a court to decline to enforce a contract whose terms are seriously one-sided, exploitative, or otherwise manifestly unfair. It is often criticized for being paternalist. The essay argues that the characterization of unconscionability doctrine as paternalist reflects common but misleading thought about paternalism and obscures more important issues about autonomy and social connection. The defense responds to another criticism: that unconscionability doctrine is an inappropriate, because economically inefficient, egalitarian tool. The final part discusses (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   167 citations  
  • Public Health Ethics.Stephen Holland - 2007 - Hoboken, NJ: Polity.
    How far should we go in protecting and promoting public health? Can we force people to give up unhealthy habits and make healthier choices, or does everyone have the right to decide their own lifestyle? Should we stop treating smokers who refuse to give up smoking? Should we put a tax on fatty foods and ban vending machines in schools to address the obesity epidemic? Should parents be required to have their children vaccinated? Are some of our screening programmes unethical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  • Equity and Choice: An Essay in Economics and Applied Philosophy.Julian Le Grand - 2002 - Routledge.
    Offering a new answer to an age-old problem: the meaning of a just or equitable distribution of resources, Julian Le Grand examines the principal interpretations of equity used by economists and political philosophers. He argues that none captures the essence of the term as well as an alternative conception relating equity to the existence or otherwise of individual choice. Le Grand shows that this conception is not only philosophically well-grounded but is also directly relevant to key areas of distributional policy. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Handbook of Qualitative Research.N. Denzin & Y. Lincoln - 1994 - British Journal of Educational Studies 42 (4):409-410.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   218 citations  
  • Harm to Self.Joel Feinberg - 1986 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This is the third volume of Joel Feinberg's highly regarded The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, a four-volume series in which Feinberg skillfully addresses a complex question: What kinds of conduct may the state make criminal without infringing on the moral autonomy of individual citizens? In Harm to Self, Feinberg offers insightful commentary into various notions attached to self-inflicted harm, covering such topics as legal paternalism, personal sovereignty and its boundaries, voluntariness and assumptions of risk, consent and its counterfeits, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   185 citations  
  • Paternalism.Gerald Dworkin - 1972 - The Monist 56 (1):64-84.
    I take as my starting point the “one very simple principle” proclaimed by Mill in On Liberty … “That principle is, that the sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively, in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self-protection. That the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others. He cannot rightfully be compelled to do (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   293 citations  
  • Ethical Issues in the Use of Cost Effectiveness Analysis for the Prioritization of Health Care Resources.Dan Brock - 2004 - In Sudhir Anand (ed.), Public Health, Ethics, and Equity. Oxford University Press UK.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • The Meaning of 'Public' in 'Public Health'.Marcel Verweij & Angus Dawson - 2009 - In Angus Dawson & Marcel Verweij (eds.), Ethics, Prevention, and Public Health. Oxford University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  • Hiding From Humanity: Disgust, Shame, and the Law.Martha C. Nussbaum - 2004 - Princeton University Press.
    Should laws about sex and pornography be based on social conventions about what is disgusting? Should felons be required to display bumper stickers or wear T-shirts that announce their crimes? This powerful and elegantly written book, by one of America's most influential philosophers, presents a critique of the role that shame and disgust play in our individual and social lives and, in particular, in the law.Martha Nussbaum argues that we should be wary of these emotions because they are associated in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   199 citations  
  • The moral high ground: Reflections on ethical dilemmas in unethical circumstances.Pascale Allotey & Catherine Lazroo - 2004 - Monash Bioethics Review 23 (4):S78-S84.
    In this paper we reflect on the challenges of maintaining traditional ethical standards in social health research with asylum seeker detainees. Researchers in this context who begin from a clear advocacy position can face various dilemmas in the research process. The need to demonstrate particular research outcomes that support an advocacy position has the potential to compromise the veracity of the research endeavour. We review the potential benefits and risks to researchers and asylum seekers in this area, and argue that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Legal paternalism.Douglas N. Husak - 2003 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The Oxford handbook of practical ethics. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 387--388.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Moral Reasoning.Henry S. Richardson - 2013 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Moral reasoning is individual or collective practical reasoning about what, morally, one ought to do. Philosophical examination of moral reasoning faces both distinctive puzzles — about how we recognize moral considerations and cope with conflicts among them and about how they move us to act — and distinctive opportunities for gleaning insight about what we ought to do from how we reason about what we ought to do.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Social Justice: The Moral Foundations of Public Health and Health Policy.Madison Powers & Ruth Faden - 2008 - Oup Usa.
    In bioethics, discussions of justice have tended to focus on questions of fairness in access to health care: is there a right to medical treatment, and how should priorities be set when medical resources are scarce. But health care is only one of many factors that determine the extent to which people live healthy lives, and fairness is not the only consideration in determining whether a health policy is just. In this pathbreaking book, senior bioethicists Powers and Faden confront foundational (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   153 citations  
  • Ethics, Prevention, and Public Health.Angus Dawson & Marcel Verweij (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    In these twelve papers notable ethicists use the resources of ethical theory to illuminate important theoretical and practical topics, including the nature of public health, notions of community, population bioethics, the legitimate role of law, the use of cost-effectiveness as a methodology, vaccinations, and the nature of infectious disease.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • Legal Paternalism.Joel Feinberg - 1971 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):105 - 124.
    The principle of legal paternalism justifies state coercion to protect individuals from self-inflicted harm, or in its extreme version, to guide them, whether they like it or not, toward their own good. Parents can be expected to justify their interference in the lives of their children on the ground that “daddy knows best.” legal paternalism seems to imply that since the state often can know the interests of individual citizens better than the citizens know them themselves, it stands as a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   93 citations  
  • The need for systematic reviews of reasons.Neema Sofaer & Daniel Strech - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (6):315-328.
    There are many ethical decisions in the practice of health research and care, and in the creation of policy and guidelines. We argue that those charged with making such decisions need a new genre of review. The new genre is an application of the systematic review, which was developed over decades to inform medical decision-makers about what the totality of studies that investigate links between smoking and cancer, for example, implies about whether smoking causes cancer. We argue that there is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Global Health and Global Health Ethics.Solomon Benatar & Gillian Brock (eds.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction; Part I. Global Health, Definitions and Descriptions: 1. What is global health? Solly Benatar and Ross Upshur; 2. The state of global health in a radically unequal world: patterns and prospects Ron Labonte and Ted Schrecker; 3. Addressing the societal determinants of health: the key global health ethics imperative of our times Anne-Emmanuelle Birn; 4. Gender and global health: inequality and differences Lesley Doyal and Sarah Payne; 5. Heath systems and health Martin McKee; Part (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • How Physicians Allocate Scarce Resources at the Bedside: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies.D. Strech, M. Synofzik & G. Marckmann - 2008 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (1):80-99.
    Although rationing of scarce health-care resources is inevitable in clinical practice, there is still limited and scattered information about how physicians perceive and execute this bedside rationing (BSR) and how it can be performed in an ethically fair way. This review gives a systematic overview on physicians’ perspectives on influences, strategies, and consequences of health-care rationing. Relevant references as identified by systematically screening major electronic databases and manuscript references were synthesized by thematic analysis. Retrieved studies focused on themes that fell (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  • Just health responsibility.H. Schmidt - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (1):21-26.
    Although the responsibility for health debate has intensified in several ways between Norman Daniels’ 1985 Just healthcare and Just health: meeting health needs fairly of 2008, comparatively little space is dedicated to the issue in Just health, and Daniels notes repeatedly that his account “says nothing about personal responsibility for health”. Daniels considers health responsibility mainly in a particular luck-egalitarian version which he rejects because of its potentially unfeasible, penalising and inhumane character. But I show that he nonetheless acknowledges and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Inclusion of Adolescent Women in Microbicide Trials: A Public Health Imperative!S. Pomfret, Q. A. Karim & S. R. Benatar - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (1):39-50.
    Conventional and well-established guidelines for the ethical conduct of clinical research are necessary but not sufficient for addressing research dilemmas related to public health research. There is a particular need for a public health ethics framework when, in the face of an epidemic, research is urgently needed to promote the common good. While there is limited experience in the use of a public health ethics framework, the value and potential of such an approach is increasingly being appreciated. Here we use (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Smoking and Social Justice.Kristin Voigt - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (2):91-106.
    Smoking is disproportionately common among the disadvantaged, both within many countries and globally; the burden associated with smoking is, therefore, borne to a great extent by the disadvantaged. In this paper, I argue that this should be regarded as a problem of social justice. Even though smokers do, in a sense, ‘choose’ to smoke, the extent to which these choices can legitimise the resulting inequalities is limited by the unequal circumstances in which they are made. An analysis of the empirical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  • A moderate pluralist approach to public health policy and ethics.Michael J. Selgelid - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (2):195-205.
    Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, The Australian National University, LPO Box 8260, ANU, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia. Email: michael.selgelid{at}anu.edu.au ' + u + '@ ' + d + ' '/ /- ->. Home page: http: //www.cappe.edu.au/staff/michael-selgelid.htmThis article advocates the development of a moderate pluralist theory of political philosophy that recognizes that utility, liberty and equality are legitimate, independent social values and that none should have absolute priority over the others. Inter alia, such a theory would provide a principled (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • A relational account of public health ethics.Françoise Baylis, Nuala P. Kenny & Susan Sherwin - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (3):196-209.
    oise Baylis, 1234 Le Marchant Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 3P7. Tel.: (902)-494–2873; Fax: (902)-494-2924; Email: francoise.baylis{at}dal.ca ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract Recently, there has been a growing interest in public health and public health ethics. Much of this interest has been tied to efforts to draw up national and international plans to deal with a global pandemic. It is common for these plans to state the importance of drawing upon a well-developed (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   84 citations  
  • Liberalism, altruism and group consent.Kalle Grill - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (2):146-157.
    This article first describes a dilemma for liberalism: On the one hand restricting their own options is an important means for groups of people to shape their lives. On the other hand, group members are typically divided over whether or not to accept option-restricting solutions or policies. Should we restrict the options of all members of a group even though some consent and some do not? This dilemma is particularly relevant to public health policy, which typically target groups of people (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • The social construction of what?Ian Hacking - 1999 - Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.
    Especially troublesome in this dispute is the status of the natural sciences, and this is where Hacking finds some of his most telling cases, from the conflict ...
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   638 citations  
  • What we owe to each other.Thomas Scanlon - 1998 - Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    In this book, T. M. Scanlon offers new answers to these questions, as they apply to the central part of morality that concerns what we owe to each other.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2497 citations  
  • Science in action: how to follow scientists and engineers through society.Bruno Latour - 1987 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    In this book Bruno Latour brings together these different approaches to provide a lively and challenging analysis of science, demonstrating how social context..
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1205 citations  
  • Paternalism.Gerald Dworkin - 1972 - The Monist.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   172 citations  
  • Equality and priority.Derek Parfit - 1997 - Ratio 10 (3):202–221.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   312 citations  
  • Racial profiling versus community.Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen - 2006 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (2):191–205.
    abstract A police technique known as racial profiling draws on statistical beliefs about crime rates in racial groups. Supposing that such beliefs are true, and that racial profiling is effective in fighting crime, is such profiling morally justified? Recently, Risse and Zeckhauser have explored the racial profiling of African‐Americans and argued that justification is forthcoming from a utilitarian as well as deontological point of view. Drawing on criticisms made by G. A. Cohen of the incentives argument for inequality, I argue (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Experts: Which ones should you trust?Alvin I. Goldman - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (1):85-110.
    Mainstream epistemology is a highly theoretical and abstract enterprise. Traditional epistemologists rarely present their deliberations as critical to the practical problems of life, unless one supposes—as Hume, for example, did not—that skeptical worries should trouble us in our everyday affairs. But some issues in epistemology are both theoretically interesting and practically quite pressing. That holds of the problem to be discussed here: how laypersons should evaluate the testimony of experts and decide which of two or more rival experts is most (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   361 citations  
  • Distributive justice and clinical trials in the third world.D. R. Cooley - 2001 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (3):151-167.
    One of the arguments against conducting human subject trials in the Third World adopts a distributive justice principle found in a commentary of the CIOM'S Eighth Guideline for international research on human subjects. Critics argue that non-participant members of the community in which the trials are conducted are exploited because sponsoring agencies do not ensure that the products developed have been made reasonably available to these individuals. I argue that the distributive principle's wording is too vague and ambiguous to be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Why sufficiency is not enough.Paula Casal - 2007 - Ethics 117 (2):296-326.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   185 citations  
  • What's Wrong with Selling Yourself into Slavery? Paternalism and Deep Autonomy.Andrew Sneddon - 2001 - Critica 33 (98):97-121.
    Such thinkers as John Stuart Mill, Gerald Dworkin, and Richard Doerflinger have appealed to the value of freedom to explain both what is wrong with slavery and what is wrong with selling oneself into slavery. Practical ethicists, including Dworkin and Doerflinger, sometimes use selling oneself into slavery in analogies intended to illustrate justifiable forms of paternalism. I argue that these thinkers have misunderstood the moral problem with slavery. Instead of being a central value in itself, I argue that freedom is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Biological Complexity and Integrative Pluralism.Sandra D. Mitchell - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    This fine collection of essays by a leading philosopher of science presents a defence of integrative pluralism as the best description for the complexity of scientific inquiry today. The tendency of some scientists to unify science by reducing all theories to a few fundamental laws of the most basic particles that populate our universe is ill-suited to the biological sciences, which study multi-component, multi-level, evolved complex systems. This integrative pluralism is the most efficient way to understand the different and complex (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   172 citations  
  • Limits to Health Care: Fair Procedures, Democratic Deliberation, and the Legitimacy Problem for Insurers.Norman Daniels & James Sabin - 1997 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 26 (4):303-350.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   115 citations  
  • Public Health, Ethics, and Equity.Sudhir Anand (ed.) - 2004 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In the last fifty years, average overall health status has increased more or less in parallel with a much celebrated decline in mortality, attributed mostly to poverty reduction, sanitation, nutrition, housing, immunization, and improved medical care. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that these achievements were not equally distributed. In most countries, while some social groups have benefited significantly, the situation of others has stagnated or may even have worsened.If health is a prerequisite to a person functioning as an agent, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • Medicine and Public Health, Ethics and Human Rights.Jonathan M. Mann - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 27 (3):6-13.
    There is more to modern health than new scientific discoveries, the development of new technologies, or emerging or re‐emerging diseases. World events and experiences, such as the AIDS epidemic and the humanitarian emergencies in Bosnia and Rwanda, have made this evident by creating new relationships among medicine, public health, ethics, and human rights. Each domain has seeped into the other, making allies of public health and human rights, pressing the need for an ethics of public health, and revealing the rights‐related (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  • How to write a systematic review of reasons.Daniel Strech & Neema Sofaer - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (2):121-126.
    Systematic reviews, which were developed to improve policy-making and clinical decision-making, answer an empirical question based on a minimally biased appraisal of all the relevant empirical studies. A model is presented here for writing systematic reviews of argument-based literature: literature that uses arguments to address conceptual questions, such as whether abortion is morally permissible or whether research participants should be legally entitled to compensation for sustaining research-related injury. Such reviews aim to improve ethically relevant decisions in healthcare, research or policy. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Reasons Why Post-Trial Access to Trial Drugs Should, or Need not be Ensured to Research Participants: A Systematic Review.N. Sofaer & D. Strech - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (2):160-184.
    Background : researchers and sponsors increasingly confront the issue of whether participants in a clinical trial should have post-trial access (PTA) to the trial drug. Legislation and guidelines are inconsistent, ambiguous or silent about many aspects of PTA. Recent research highlights the potential importance of systematic reviews (SRs) of reason-based literatures in informing decision-making in medicine, medical research and health policy. Purpose: to systematically review reasons why drug trial participants should, or need not be ensured PTA to the trial drug (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  • Public Health Ethics: Key Concepts and Issues in Policy and Practice.Angus Dawson (ed.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction Angus Dawson; Part I. Concepts: 1. Resetting the parameters: public health as the foundation for public health ethics Angus Dawson; 2. Health, disease and the goal of public health Bengt Brülde; 3. Selective reproduction, eugenics and public health Stephen Wilkinson; 4. Risk and precaution Stephen John; Part II. Issues: 5. Smoking, health and ethics Richard Ashcroft; 6. Infectious disease control Marcel Verweij; 7. Population screening Ainsley Newson; 8. Vaccination ethics Angus Dawson; 9. Environment, ethics (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Bonuses as Incentives and Rewards for Health Responsibility: A Good Thing?H. Schmidt - 2008 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (3):198-220.
    Bonuses, as incentives or rewards for health -related behavior, feature prominently in German social health insurance. Their goal is centered around promoting personal responsibility, but reducing overall health -care expenditure and enabling competition between sickness funds also play a role. The central position of personal responsibility in German health -care policy is described, and a framework is offered for an analysis of the ethical issues raised by policies seeking to promote responsibility. The framework entails seven tests relating to: solidarity; equality (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • New Types of Solidarity in the European Welfare State.Rob Houtepen - 2000 - Health Care Analysis 8 (4):329-340.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations