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  1. A Theory of Justice.John Rawls - unknown
    Since it appeared in 1971, John Rawls's A Theory of Justice has become a classic. The author has now revised the original edition to clear up a number of difficulties he and others have found in the original book. Rawls aims to express an essential part of the common core of the democratic tradition--justice as fairness--and to provide an alternative to utilitarianism, which had dominated the Anglo-Saxon tradition of political thought since the nineteenth century. Rawls substitutes the ideal of the (...)
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  • A Theory of Justice: Original Edition.John Rawls - 2005 - Belknap Press.
    Though the revised edition of A Theory of Justice, published in 1999, is the definitive statement of Rawls's view, so much of the extensive literature on Rawls's theory refers to the first edition. This reissue makes the first edition once again available for scholars and serious students of Rawls's work.
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  • Political Liberalism.J. Rawls - 1995 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 57 (3):596-598.
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  • Political Liberalism by John Rawls. [REVIEW]Philip Pettit - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy 91 (4):215-220.
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  • Is There a Human Right to Democracy?Joshua Cohen - 2006 - In Christine Sypnowich (ed.), The Egalitarian Conscience: Essays in Honour of G. A. Cohen. Oxford University Press.
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  • Beyond Liberal Democracy: Political Thinking for an East Asian Context.Daniel A. Bell - 2006 - Princeton University Press.
    Is liberal democracy appropriate for East Asia? In this provocative book, Daniel Bell argues for morally legitimate alternatives to Western-style liberal democracy in the region. Beyond Liberal Democracy, which continues the author's influential earlier work, is divided into three parts that correspond to the three main hallmarks of liberal democracy--human rights, democracy, and capitalism. These features have been modified substantially during their transmission to East Asian societies that have been shaped by nonliberal practices and values. Bell points to the dangers (...)
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  • Political Liberalism.John Rawls - 1993 - Columbia University Press.
    This book continues and revises the ideas of justice as fairness that John Rawls presented in _A Theory of Justice_ but changes its philosophical interpretation in a fundamental way. That previous work assumed what Rawls calls a "well-ordered society," one that is stable and relatively homogenous in its basic moral beliefs and in which there is broad agreement about what constitutes the good life. Yet in modern democratic society a plurality of incompatible and irreconcilable doctrines--religious, philosophical, and moral--coexist within the (...)
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  • Reflections on Habermas on Democracy.Joshua Cohen - 1999 - Ratio Juris 12 (4):385-416.
    Jiirgen Habermas is a radical democrat. The source of that self-designation is that his conception of democracy-what he calls "discursive democracy"-is founded on the ideal of "a self-organizing community of free and equal citizens," co- ordinating their collective affairs through their common reason. The author discusses three large challenges to this radical-democratic ideal of collective self-regulation: 1) What is the role of private autonomy in a radical-democratic view? 2) What role does reason play in collective self-regulation? 3) What relevance might (...)
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  • A theory of justice.John Rawls - 2009 - In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring ethics: an introductory anthology. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 133-135.
    Though the Revised Edition of A Theory of Justice, published in 1999, is the definitive statement of Rawlsıs view, so much of the extensive literature on ...
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  • The law of peoples.John Rawls - 1999 - Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. Edited by John Rawls.
    Consisting of two essays, this work by a Harvard professor offers his thoughts on the idea of a social contract regulating people's behavior toward one another.
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  • Minimalism about human rights: The most we can hope for?Joshua Cohen - 2004 - Journal of Political Philosophy 12 (2):190–213.
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  • The creative tension between jên and li.Wei-Ming Tu - 1968 - Philosophy East and West 18 (1/2):29-39.
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  • The Law of Peoples.John Rawls - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (203):246-253.
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  • The Law of Peoples.John Rawls - 1993 - Critical Inquiry 20 (1):36-68.
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  • Way, Learning, and Politics: Essays on the Confucian Intellectual.Wei-Ming Tu - 1993 - SUNY Press.
    Tu (Chinese history and philosophy, Harvard U.) offers a panoramic view of the core values of Confucian intellectual thought that have kept it vital for more than two millennia, and underlie the recent resurgence in eastern Asia. Of interest to students of either China or religion and ethics. Paper edition (unseen), $14.95. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR.
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  • Identity in Democracy.Amy Gutmann - 2004 - Princeton University Press.
    I doubt that even one of her readers will agree with all of Gutmann's conclusions--but they will all have to take account of the wealth of empirical evidence and stringent reasoning in this book.
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  • Democracy in decent nonliberal nations: A defense.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2009 - Philosophical Forum 40 (3):309-337.
    Western democracy theorists accept the "liberal democracy thesis" and claim that the only morally justifiable conception of democracy is liberal democracy regulated by substantive liberal values. According to this thesis, democracy not regulated by liberal values in nonliberal nations, if at all feasible, necessarily leads to the oppression of minorities and is therefore morally unjustifiable. This article aims to refute the liberal democracy thesis by arguing that democracy in "decent" nonliberal nations is not only feasible but also morally justifiable.
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  • The evolution of the confucian concept jên.Wing-Tsit Chan - 1955 - Philosophy East and West 4 (4):295-319.
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  • Rawls's law of peoples.Charles R. Beitz - 2000 - Ethics 110 (4):669-696.
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  • Thinking through Confucius.David L. Hall & Roger T. Ames - 1987 - Philosophy East and West 41 (2):241-254.
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  • Democracy and Confucian values.Shaun O'Dwyer - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (1):39-63.
    This essay considers a number of proposals for liberal political democracy in East Asian societies, and some of the critical responses such proposals have attracted from political philosophers and from East Asian intellectuals and leaders. These proposals may well be ill-suited to the distinctive traditional values of societies claiming a Confucian inheritance. Offered here instead is a pragmatist- and Confucian-inspired vision of participatory democracy in civic life that is possibly better able to address the problem of conserving and continuing these (...)
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  • Li as process of humanization.Wei-Ming Tu - 1972 - Philosophy East and West 22 (2):187-201.
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  • The Democracy of the Dead: Dewey, Confucius, and the Hope for Democracy in China.David L. Hall & Roger T. Ames - 1999 - Open Court Publishing Company.
    Will democracy figure prominently in China's future? If so, what kind of democracy? In this insightful and thought-provoking book, David Hall and Roger Ames explore such questions and, in the course of answering them, look to the ideas of John Dewey and Confucius.
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  • The conceptual framework of confucian ethical thought.A. S. Cua - 1996 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (2):153-174.
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  • Pain and suffering in confucian self-cultivation.Tu Wei-Ming - 1984 - Philosophy East and West 34 (4):379-388.
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  • Chong Tojon.Chai-sik Chung & William Theodore Debary - 1985 - In William Theodore De Bary & JaHyun Kim Haboush (eds.), The Rise of Neo-Confucianism in Korea. New York: Columbia University Press. pp. 59-88.
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  • 2 For a Democratic Society.Joshua Cohen - 2002 - In Samuel Freeman (ed.), The Cambridge companion to Rawls. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 86.
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  • On the mencian perception of moral self-development.Wei-Ming Tu - 1978 - The Monist 61 (1):72 - 81.
    Mencius’ claim that human nature is good is well known among students of classical Confucian thought. It has been taken for granted that underlying Mencius’ deceptively simple thesis is an appeal to intuition. No persuasive argument is offered, except the insistence that the moral propensities, such as the “four germinations” are inherent in human nature. A corollary of this insistence is the unquestioned belief that human beings all have the inner ability to commiserate with others, to feel ashamed of themselves, (...)
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  • A Short History of Chinese Philosophy.Wing-Tsit Chan - 1951 - Philosophy East and West 1 (1):74-76.
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