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  1. What’s so Bad About Scientism?Moti Mizrahi - 2017 - Social Epistemology 31 (4):351-367.
    In their attempt to defend philosophy from accusations of uselessness made by prominent scientists, such as Stephen Hawking, some philosophers respond with the charge of ‘scientism.’ This charge makes endorsing a scientistic stance, a mistake by definition. For this reason, it begs the question against these critics of philosophy, or anyone who is inclined to endorse a scientistic stance, and turns the scientism debate into a verbal dispute. In this paper, I propose a different definition of scientism, and thus a (...)
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  • Science as Truth.Peter Atkins - 1995 - History of the Human Sciences 8 (2):97-102.
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  • Scientism: Prospects and Problems.Jeroen de Ridder, Rik Peels & René van Woudenberg (eds.) - 2018 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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  • Human Nature and the Limits of Science.John Dupré - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    John Dupre warns that our understanding of human nature is being distorted by two faulty and harmful forms of pseudo-scientific thinking. Not just in the academic world but in everyday life, we find one set of experts who seek to explain the ends at which humans aim in terms of evolutionary theory, while the other set uses economic models to give rules of how we act to achieve those ends. Dupre demonstrates that these theorists' explanations do not work and that, (...)
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  • Ontological Relativity: The Dewey Lectures 1969.Willard V. Quine - 1968 - Journal of Philosophy 65 (7):185-212.
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  • Ontological Relativity.W. V. Quine - 1968 - Journal of Philosophy 65 (7):185-212.
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  • The Counter-Revolution of Science. [REVIEW]W. J. H. Sprott - 1953 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 4 (15):246-248.
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  • More in Defense of Weak Scientism.Moti Mizrahi - 2018 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 7 (4):7-25.
    In my (2017a), I defend a view I call Weak Scientism, which is the view that knowledge produced by scientific disciplines is better than knowledge produced by non-scientific disciplines. Scientific knowledge can be said to be quantitatively better than non-scientific knowledge insofar as scientific disciplines produce more impactful knowledge–in the form of scholarly publications–than non-scientific disciplines (as measured by research output and research impact). Scientific knowledge can be said to be qualitatively better than non-scientific knowledge insofar as such knowledge is (...)
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  • Scientific Imperialism: Exploring the Boundaries of Interdisciplinarity.Uskali Mäki, Adrian Walsh & Manuela Fernández Pinto - 2018 - Routledge.
    The growing body of research on interdisciplinarity has encouraged a more in depth analysis of the relations that hold among academic disciplines. In particular, the incursion of one scientific discipline into another discipline's traditional domain, also known as scientific imperialism, has been a matter of increasing debate. Following this trend, Scientific Imperialism aims to bring together philosophers of science and historians of science interested in the topic of scientific imperialism and, in particular, interested in the conceptual clarification, empirical identification, and (...)
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  • Aristotle.Christopher Shields - 2007 - Routledge.
    In this excellent introduction, Christopher Shields introduces and assesses the whole of Aristotle’s philosophy, showing how his powerful conception of human nature shaped much of his thinking on the nature of the soul and the mind, ethics, politics and the arts. Beginning with a brief biography, Christopher Shields carefully explains the fundamental elements of Aristotle’s thought: his explanatory framework, his philosophical methodology and his four-causal explanatory scheme. Subsequently he discusses Aristotle’s metaphysics and the theory of categories and logical theory and (...)
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  • Science as Salvation: A Modern Myth and its Meaning.Mary Midgley - 1992 - Routledge.
    Science as Salvation discusses the high spiritual ambitions which tend to gather round the notion of science. Officially, science claims only the modest function of establishing facts. Yet people still hope for something much grander from it--namely, the myths by which to shape and support life in an increasingly confusing age. Our faith in science is abused by some scientists whose adolescent fantasies have spilled over into their professional lives. Salvation, immortality, mastery of the universe, humans without bodies, and intelligent (...)
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  • Every Thing Must Go: Metaphysics Naturalized.James Ladyman & Don Ross - 2007 - In James Ladyman, Don Ross, David Spurrett & John Collier (eds.), Every Thing Must Go: Metaphysics Naturalized. Oxford University Press.
    This book argues that the only kind of metaphysics that can contribute to objective knowledge is one based specifically on contemporary science as it really is, and not on philosophers' a priori intuitions, common sense, or simplifications of science. In addition to showing how recent metaphysics has drifted away from connection with all other serious scholarly inquiry as a result of not heeding this restriction, this book demonstrates how to build a metaphysics compatible with current fundamental physics, which, when combined (...)
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  • Scientism with a Humane Face.James Ladyman - 2018 - In J. de Ridder, R. Peels & R. van Woudenberg (eds.), Scientism: Prospects and Problems.
    Scientism is usually thought of as sinful, but it can be redeemed for our salvation. Scientism should not be dogmatic, nor should it ignore the actual limitations to current science. Other modes of inquiry deserve epistemic respect, and scientists should not be deferred to about matters beyond their expertise. However, limits should not be placed on what science can study and we cannot say in advance what the limits of future science will be. Where science conflicts with common sense, religion, (...)
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  • Ontological Relativity.Willard van Orman Quine - 1969 - In Ontological Relativity and Other Essays. Columbia University Press. pp. 26-68.
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  • Scientific Imperialism and the Proper Relations Between the Sciences.Steve Clarke & Adrian Walsh - 2009 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 23 (2):195-207.
    John Dupr argues that 'scientific imperialism' can result in 'misguided' science being considered acceptable. 'Misguided' is an explicitly normative term and the use of the pejorative 'imperialistic' is implicitly normative. However, Dupr has not justified the normative dimension of his critique. We identify two ways in which it might be justified. It might be justified if colonisation prevents a discipline from progressing in ways that it might otherwise progress. It might also be justified if colonisation prevents the expression of important (...)
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  • Scientism and Pseudoscience: A Philosophical Commentary.Massimo Pigliucci - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):569-575.
    The term “scientism” is used in a variety of ways with both negative and positive connotations. I suggest that some of these uses are inappropriate, as they aim simply at dismissing without argument an approach that a particular author does not like. However, there are legitimate negative uses of the term, which I explore by way of an analogy with the term “pseudoscience.” I discuss these issues by way of a recent specific example provided by a controversy in the field (...)
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  • Scientific Imperialism: Difficulties in Definition, Identification, and Assessment.Uskali Mäki - 2013 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (3):325-339.
    This article identifies and analyses issues related to defining and evaluating the so-called scientific imperialism. It discusses John Dupré's account, suggesting that it is overly conservative and does not offer a definition of scientific imperialism in not presenting it as a phenomenon of interdisciplinarity. It then discusses the recent account by Steve Clarke and Adrian Walsh, taking issue with ideas such as illegitimate occupation, counterfactual progress, and culturally significant values. A more comprehensive and refined framework of my own is then (...)
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  • What is Scientism?Mikael Stenmark - 1997 - Religious Studies 33 (1):15-32.
    In this article I try to define more precisely what scientism is and how it is related to a traditional religion such as Christianity. By first examining the writing of a number of contemporary natural scientists (Francis Crick, Richard Dawkins, Stephen Hawking, Carl Sagan and Edward O. Wilson), I show that the concept can be given numerous different meanings. I propose and defend a distinction between epistemic, rationalistic, ontological, axiological and redemptive scientism and it is also explained why we should (...)
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  • Ten Reasons to Embrace Scientism.Rik Peels - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 63:11-21.
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  • Noam Chomsky: A Life of Dissent.George Szanto & Robert F. Barsky - 1998 - Substance 27 (2):128.
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  • Human Nature and the Limits of Science.John Dupré - 2004 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 194 (1):134-135.
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  • Beyond Freedom and Dignity.B. F. Skinner - 1974 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 7 (1):58-69.
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  • Beyond Fredom and Dignity.B. F. Skinner - 1973 - Science and Society 37 (2):227-229.
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  • On Mental Entities.Willard V. Quine - 1966 - In W. V. Quine (ed.), The Ways of Paradox and Other Essays. Random House.
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