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  1. Teaching and Truthfulness.David E. Cooper - 2008 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (2-3):79-87.
    Some tendencies in modern education—the stress on ‘performativity’, for instance, and ‘celebration of difference’—threaten the value traditionally placed on truthful teaching. In this paper, truthfulness is mainly understood, following Bernard Williams, as a disposition to ‘Accuracy’ and ‘Sincerity’—hence as a virtue. It is to be distinguished from truth, and current debates about the nature of truth are not relevant to the issue of the value of truthfulness. This issue devolves into the question of whether truthfulness is a distinctive virtue of (...)
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  • Humane Philosophy and the Question of Progress.Ian James Kidd - 2012 - Ratio 25 (3):277-290.
    According to some recent critics, philosophy has not progressed over the course of its history because it has not exhibited any substantial increase in the stock of human wisdom. I reject this pessimistic conclusion by arguing that such criticisms employ a conception of progress drawn from the sciences which is inapplicable to a humanistic discipline such as philosophy. Philosophy should not be understood as the accumulation of epistemic goods in a manner analogous to the natural sciences. I argue that the (...)
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  • Feyerabend on Science and Education.Ian James Kidd - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (3):407-422.
    This article offers a sympathetic interpretation of Paul Feyerabend's remarks on science and education. I present a formative episode in the development of his educational ideas—the ‘Berkeley experience'—and describe how it affected his views on the place of science within modern education. It emerges that Feyerabend arrived at a conception of education closely related to that of Michael Oakeshott and Martin Heidegger—that of education as ‘releasement’. Each of those three figures argued that the purpose of education was not to induct (...)
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  • Knowledge Without Foundations.Paul Feyerabend - 1962 - [Oberlin]Oberlin College.
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  • Reconsidering Feyerabend’s “Anarchism‘.Jonathan Y. Tsou - 2003 - Perspectives on Science 11 (2):208-235.
    This paper explores Paul Feyerabend's (1924-1994) skeptical arguments for "anarchism" in his early writings between 1960 to 1975. Feyerabend's position is encapsulated by his well-known suggestion that the only principle for scientific method that can be defended under all circumstances is: "anything goes." I present Feyerabend's anarchism as a recommendation for pluralism that assumes a realist view of scientific theories. The aims of this paper are threefold: (1) to present a defensible view of Feyerabend's anarchism and its motivations, (2) to (...)
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  • Doing Science an Injustice: Midgley on Scientism.Ian James Kidd - 2015 - In Ian James Kidd & Elizabeth McKinnell (eds.), Science and the Self: Animals, Evolution, and Ethics: Essays in Honour of Mary Midgley. Routledge. pp. 151-167.
    In this chapter, I offer an account of Midgley‘s critique of scientism that converges on the claim that, among its many faults, scientism is objectionable because it does science an injustice.
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  • Feyerabend, Pseudo-Dionysius, and the Ineffability of Reality.Ian Kidd - 2012 - Philosophia 40 (2):365-377.
    This paper explores the influence of the fifth-century Christian Neoplatonist Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite (Denys) on the twentieth-century philosopher of science Paul Feyerabend. I argue that the later Feyerabend took from Denys a metaphysical claim—the ‘doctrine of ineffability’—intended to support epistemic pluralism. The paper has five parts. Part one introduces Denys and Feyerabend’s common epistemological concern to deny the possibility of human knowledge of ultimate reality. Part two examines Denys’ arguments for the ‘ineffability’ of God as presented in On the Divine (...)
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  • Feyerabend's Conquest of Abundance.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2002 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):249 – 267.
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  • Objectivity, Abstraction, and the Individual: The Influence of Søren Kierkegaard on Paul Feyerabend.Ian James Kidd - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):125-134.
    This paper explores the influence of Søren Kierkegaard upon Paul Feyerabend by examining their common criticisms of totalising accounts of human nature. Both complained that philosophical and scientific theories of human nature which were methodologically committed to objectivity and abstraction failed to capture the richness of human experience. Kierkegaard and Feyerabend argued that philosophy and the science were threatening to become obstacles to human development by imposing abstract theories of human nature and reality which denied the complexities of both. In (...)
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  • ‘“What’s So Great About Science?” Feyerabend on the Ideological Use and Abuse of Science.Ian James Kidd - 2016 - In Elena Aronova & Simone Turchetti (eds.), Science Studies during the Cold War and Beyond. Basingstoke: Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 55-76.
    It is very well known that from the late-1960s onwards Feyerabend began to radically challenge some deeply-held ideas about the history and methodology of the sciences. It is equally well known that, from around the same period, he also began to radically challenge wider claims about the value and place of the sciences within modern societies, for instance by calling for the separation of science and the state and by questioning the idea that the sciences served to liberate and ameliorate (...)
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  • On the Critique of Scientific Reason.Paul K. Feyerabend - 1976 - In R. S. Cohen, P. K. Feyerabend & M. Wartofsky (eds.), Essays in Memory of Imre Lakatos. Reidel. pp. 109--143.
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  • The Scientific Consensus on Climate Change: How Do We Know We 'Re Not Wrong?'.Naomi Oreskes - 2007 - In Joseph F. DiMento & Pamela Doughman (eds.), Climate Change: What It Means for Us, Our Children, and Our Grandchildren. MIT Press. pp. 65.
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  • Paul Feyerabend.John Preston - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Science, Freedom and the Good Life.Paul Feyerabend - 1968 - Philosophical Forum 1 (2):127.
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  • Paul K. Feyerabend: An Obituary.Paul Hoyningen-Huene - 2000 - In John Preston, Gonzalo Munévar & David Lamb (eds.), 'The Worst Enemy of Science'?: Essays in Memory of Paul Feyerabend. Oup Usa.
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  • Consolations for the Specialist1.Paul Feyerabend - 1970 - In Imre Lakatos & Alan Musgrave (eds.), Criticism and the Growth of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press. pp. 197.
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