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  1. Towards a Broader Understanding of Agency in Biomedical Ethics.Rodrigo López Barreda, Manuel Trachsel & Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (3):475-483.
    With advances in medical science, the concept of agency has received increasing attention in biomedical ethics. However, most of the ethical discussion around definitions of agency has focused either on patients suffering from mental disorders or on patients receiving cutting-edge medical treatments in developed countries. Very little of the discussion around concepts of agency has focused on the situation of patients suffering from common diseases that affect populations worldwide. Therefore, the most widely-used definitions of agency may be not appropriate to (...)
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  • Epistemic Injustice in Healthcare: A Philosophical Analysis.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):529-540.
    In this paper we argue that ill persons are particularly vulnerable to epistemic injustice in the sense articulated by Fricker. Ill persons are vulnerable to testimonial injustice through the presumptive attribution of characteristics like cognitive unreliability and emotional instability that downgrade the credibility of their testimonies. Ill persons are also vulnerable to hermeneutical injustice because many aspects of the experience of illness are difficult to understand and communicate and this often owes to gaps in collective hermeneutical resources. We then argue (...)
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  • Chronic Disease, Prevention Policy, and the Future of Public Health and Primary Care.Rick Mayes & Blair Armistead - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):691-697.
    Globally, chronic disease and conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression and cancer are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Why, then, are public health efforts and programs aimed at preventing chronic disease so difficult to implement and maintain? Also, why is primary care—the key medical specialty for helping persons with chronic disease manage their illnesses—in decline? Public health suffers from its often being socially controversial, personally intrusive, irritating to many powerful corporate interests, and structurally designed to be largely (...)
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  • Prioritisation in Healthcare—Still Muddling Through.Bert Gordijn & Henk ten Have - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):109-110.
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  • The Ethics of Self-Management Preparation for Chronic Illness.Barbara K. Redman - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (4):360-369.
    While nearly all patients with a chronic disease must self-manage their condition to some extent, preparation for these responsibilities is infrequently assured in the USA. The result can be significant harm and the undermining of a patient’s ability to take advantage of life opportunities and be productive. Agreeing to care for a patient involves a moral responsibility to see that she or he receives the essential elements of care, including the ability to manage the disease on a daily basis. The (...)
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  • Why Socio-Economic Inequalities in Health Threaten Relational Justice. A Proposal for an Instrumental Evaluation.Beatrijs Haverkamp, Marcel Verweij & Karien Stronks - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (3):311-324.
    In this article, we argue that apart from evaluating the causes and the social determinants of health inequalities, an evaluation of the effects of health inequalities is due. For this, we propose the ideal of relational equality as an evaluative framework, and test to what extent health inequalities threaten this ideal of a society of equals. We identify three ways in which they do and argue that these risks are especially great for those lower down the socio-economic strata. We thus (...)
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  • Epistemic Injustice and Illness.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):172-190.
    This article analyses the phenomenon of epistemic injustice within contemporary healthcare. We begin by detailing the persistent complaints patients make about their testimonial frustration and hermeneutical marginalization, and the negative impact this has on their care. We offer an epistemic analysis of this problem using Miranda Fricker's account of epistemic injustice. We detail two types of epistemic injustice, testimonial and hermeneutical, and identify the negative stereotypes and structural features of modern healthcare practices that generate them. We claim that these stereotypes (...)
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  • Justice, Health, and Healthcare.Norman Daniels - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (2):2 – 16.
    Healthcare (including public health) is special because it protects normal functioning, which in turn protects the range of opportunities open to individuals. I extend this account in two ways. First, since the distribution of goods other than healthcare affect population health and its distribution, I claim that Rawls's principles of justice describe a fair distribution of the social determinants of health, giving a partial account of when health inequalities are unjust. Second, I supplement a principled account of justice for health (...)
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  • Patient Autonomy for the Management of Chronic Conditions: A Two-Component Re-Conceptualization.Aanand D. Naik, Carmel B. Dyer, Mark E. Kunik & Laurence B. McCullough - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (2):23 – 30.
    The clinical application of the concept of patient autonomy has centered on the ability to deliberate and make treatment decisions (decisional autonomy) to the virtual exclusion of the capacity to execute the treatment plan (executive autonomy). However, the one-component concept of autonomy is problematic in the context of multiple chronic conditions. Adherence to complex treatments commonly breaks down when patients have functional, educational, and cognitive barriers that impair their capacity to plan, sequence, and carry out tasks associated with chronic care. (...)
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  • What is the Point of Equality?Elizabeth S. Anderson - 1999 - Ethics 109 (2):287-337.
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  • Ethics Needs Principles—Four Can Encompass the Rest—and Respect for Autonomy Should Be “First Among Equals”.R. Gillon - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (5):307-312.
    It is hypothesised and argued that “the four principles of medical ethics” can explain and justify, alone or in combination, all the substantive and universalisable claims of medical ethics and probably of ethics more generally. A request is renewed for falsification of this hypothesis showing reason to reject any one of the principles or to require any additional principle(s) that can’t be explained by one or some combination of the four principles. This approach is argued to be compatible with a (...)
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  • Varieties of Epistemic Injustice.Gaile Pohlhaus - 2017 - In Ian James Kidd, Gaile Pohlhaus & José Médina Médina (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice.
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