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  1. Pathophobia, Illness, and Vices.Ian James Kidd - 2019 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 27 (2):286-306.
    I introduce the concept pathophobia, to capture the range of morally objectionable forms of treatment to which somatically ill persons are subjected. After distinguishing this concept from sanism and ableism, I argue that the moral wrongs of pathophobia are best analysed using a framework of vice ethics. To that end I describe five clusters of pathophobic vices and failings, illustrating each with examples from three influential illness narratives.
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  • Epistemic Injustice in Healthcare Encounters: Evidence From Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.Havi Carel, Charlotte Blease & Keith Geraghty - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (8):549-557.
    Chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis remains a controversial illness category. This paper surveys the state of knowledge and attitudes about this illness and proposes that epistemic concerns about the testimonial credibility of patients can be articulated using Miranda Fricker’s concept of epistemic injustice. While there is consensus within mainstream medical guidelines that there is no known cause of CFS/ME, there is continued debate about how best to conceive of CFS/ME, including disagreement about how to interpret clinical studies of treatments. (...)
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  • Continuous Glucose Monitoring as a Matter of Justice.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-26.
    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic illness that requires intensive lifelong management of blood glucose concentrations by means of external insulin administration. There have been substantial developments in the ways of measuring glucose levels, which is crucial to T1D self-management. Recently, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has allowed people with T1D to keep track of their blood glucose levels in near real-time. These devices have alarms that warn users about potentially dangerous blood glucose trends, which can often be shared with (...)
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  • Contemporary Artists’ Books and the Intimate Aesthetics of Illness.Stella Bolaki - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):21-39.
    This essay brings together critical perspectives from the discrete traditions of artists’ books and the medical humanities to examine artists’ books by three contemporary artists – Penny Alexander, Martha A. Hall and Amanda Watson-Will – that treat experiences of illness and wellbeing. Through its focus on a multimodal and multisensory art form that has allegiances with, but is not reduced to, narrative, the essay adds to recent calls to rethink key assumptions of illness narrative study and to challenge utilitarian approaches. (...)
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  • Epistemic Injustice in Health Care Professionals and Male Breast Cancer Patients Encounters.Ahtisham Younas - forthcoming - Ethics and Behavior:1-11.
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  • Are ME/CFS Patient Organizations “Militant”?Charlotte Blease & Keith J. Geraghty - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):393-401.
    Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome is a contested illness category. This paper investigates the common claim that patients with ME/CFS—and by extension, ME/CFS patient organizations —exhibit “militant” social and political tendencies. The paper opens with a history of the protracted scientific disagreement over ME/CFS. We observe that ME/CFS POs, medical doctors, and medical researchers exhibit clear differences in opinion over how to conceptualize this illness. However, we identify a common trope in the discourse over ME/CFS: the claim of “militant” (...)
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  • “Clinician Knows Best”? Injustices in the Medicalization of Mental Illness.Abigail Gosselin - 2019 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 5 (2).
    This paper uses a non-ideal theory approach advocated for by Alison Jaggar to show that practices involved with the medicalization of serious mental disorders can subject people who have these disorders to a cycle of vulnerability that keeps them trapped within systems of injustice. When medicalization locates mental disorders solely as problems of individual biology, without regard to social factors, and when it treats mental disorders as personal defects, it perpetuates injustice in several ways: by enabling biased diagnoses through stereotyping, (...)
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  • Epistemic Vices in Organizations: Knowledge, Truth, and Unethical Conduct.Christopher Baird & Thomas S. Calvard - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (1):263-276.
    Recognizing that truth is socially constructed or that knowledge and power are related is hardly a novelty in the social sciences. In the twenty-first century, however, there appears to be a renewed concern regarding people’s relationship with the truth and the propensity for certain actors to undermine it. Organizations are highly implicated in this, given their central roles in knowledge management and production and their attempts to learn, although the entanglement of these epistemological issues with business ethics has not been (...)
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  • Unsolicited Diagnosis of Mental Disorder: Epistemic and Normative Perspectives.Gustav Preller, Anna-Henrikje Seidlein & Sabine Salloch - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (5):34-35.
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  • Illness and Disease: An Empirical-Ethical Viewpoint.Anna-Henrikje Seidlein & Sabine Salloch - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):5.
    The concepts of disease, illness and sickness capture fundamentally different aspects of phenomena related to human ailments and healthcare. The philosophy and theory of medicine are making manifold efforts to capture the essence and normative implications of these concepts. In parallel, socio-empirical studies on patients’ understanding of their situation have yielded a comprehensive body of knowledge regarding subjective perspectives on health-related statuses. Although both scientific fields provide varied valuable insights, they have not been strongly linked to each other. Therefore, the (...)
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  • Phenomenology, Mental Illness, and the Intersubjective Constitution of the Lifeworld.Anthony Vincent Fernandez - 2016 - In S. West Gurley & Geoffrey Pfeifer (eds.), Phenomenology and the Political. Rowman and Littlefield. pp. 199-214.
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  • Stop the Bleeding: We Must Combat Explicit as Well as Implicit Biases Affecting Women Surgeons.Brandi Braud Scully - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (4):244-245.
    When I was a 7 months pregnant medical student, an attending surgeon asked me to which specialty I would be applying. When I replied that I was hoping to match in general surgery, he touched my pregnant abdomen and said, “Not with that you’re not.” I am not alone. Gender bias and discrimination have been shown to negatively impact women surgeons throughout their careers and deter women from even applying in surgical fields.1 Bias against female surgical trainees leads to less (...)
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  • "A Little of Her Language": Epistemic Injustice and Mental Disability.Josh Dohmen - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (4):669-691.
    In this essay, I argue that certain injustices faced by mentally disabled persons are epistemic injustices by drawing upon epistemic injustice literature, especially as it is developed by Miranda Fricker. First, I explain the terminology and arguments developed by Fricker, Gaile Pohlhaus, Jr., and Kristie Dotson that are useful in theorizing epistemic injustices against mentally disabled people. Second, I consider some specific cases of epistemic injustice to which mentally disabled persons are subject. Third, I turn to a discussion of severely (...)
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  • Being at Home: A Feminist Phenomenology of Disorientation in Illness.Corinne Lajoie - 2019 - Hypatia 34 (3):546-569.
    This article explores the relation among illness, home, and belonging. Through a feminist phenomenological framework, I describe the disorientations of being diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and living with mental illness. This research anticipates the consequences of illness and serious disorientations for a conception of belonging as seamless body–world compatibility. Instead, this article examines how the stability of bodily dwellings in experiences of disorientation can suggest ways of being in the world that are more attentive to interdependency, unpredictability, and change (...)
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  • Naked in the Eyes of the Public: A Phenomenological Study of the Lived Experience of Suffering From Burnout While Waiting for Recognition to Be Ill.Karin Mohn Engebretsen & Wenche Schrøder Bjorbækmo - 2019 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 25 (6):1017-1026.
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  • Healthcare Practice, Epistemic Injustice, and Naturalism.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84:1-23.
    Ill persons suffer from a variety of epistemically-inflected harms and wrongs. Many of these are interpretable as specific forms of what we dub pathocentric epistemic injustices, these being ones that target and track ill persons. We sketch the general forms of pathocentric testimonial and hermeneutical injustice, each of which are pervasive within the experiences of ill persons during their encounters in healthcare contexts and the social world. What’s epistemically unjust might not be only agents, communities and institutions, but the theoretical (...)
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  • Testifying Bodies: Testimonial Injustice as Derivatization.Carolyn M. Cusick - 2019 - Social Epistemology 33 (2):111-123.
    Human beings as objects, and we are objects inter alia, offer information, even knowledge. And yet, in a society marked by pervasive identity prejudice, even objects do not offer neutral facts. Here, I argue that the harms imposed on those who suffer testimonial injustices cannot be sufficiently understood through the ethical lens of objectification. Such persons are not simply objectified, not simply treated as mere sources of information rather than as informants. Even as objects (not mere objects), they are often (...)
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  • Contributory Injustice in Psychiatry.Alex James Miller Tate - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):97-100.
    I explain the notion of contributory injustice, a kind of epistemic injustice, and argue that it occurs within psychiatric services, affecting those who hear voices. I argue that individual effort on the part of clinicians to avoid perpetrating this injustice is an insufficient response to the problem; mitigating the injustice will require open and meaningful dialogue between clinicians and service user organisations, as well as individuals. I suggest that clinicians must become familiar with and take seriously concepts and frameworks for (...)
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  • The Seeing Place: Talking Theatre and Medicine.Deborah Bowman & Joanna Bowman - 2018 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 17 (1):166-181.
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