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  1. Mapping Out Epistemic Justice in the Clinical Space: Using Narrative Techniques to Affirm Patients as Knowers.Leah Teresa Rosen - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-6.
    Epistemic injustice sits at the intersection of ethics, epistemology, and social justice. Generally, this philosophical term describes when a person is wrongfully discredited as a knower; and within the clinical space, epistemic injustice is the underlying reason that some patient testimonies are valued above others. The following essay seeks to connect patterns of social prejudice to the clinical realm in the United States: illustrating how factors such as race, gender identity, and socioeconomic status influence epistemic credence and associatively, the quality (...)
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  • Epistemic Injustice in Health Care Professionals and Male Breast Cancer Patients Encounters.Ahtisham Younas - 2021 - Ethics and Behavior 31 (6):451-461.
    ABSTRACT Breast cancer affects well-being and life quality. Despite being labeled as a woman’s disease, the incidence of breast cancer in men is increasing. Men with breast cancer are diagnosed at later stages and experience stigmatization within the health care system. As such, they are prone to gender-based inequalities in health care. This paper examines epistemic injustice in health care professionals and male breast cancer patients’ encounters through analysis of research on the experiences of male breast cancer patients. Research indicates (...)
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  • Epistemic Oppression and Ableism in Bioethics.Christine Wieseler - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (4):714-732.
    Disabled people face obstacles to participation in epistemic communities that would be beneficial for making sense of our experiences and are susceptible to epistemic oppression. Knowledge and skills grounded in disabled people's experiences are treated as unintelligible within an ableist hermeneutic, specifically, the dominant conception of disability as lack. My discussion will focus on a few types of epistemic oppression—willful hermeneutical ignorance, epistemic exploitation, and epistemic imperialism—as they manifest in some bioethicists’ claims about and interactions with disabled people. One of (...)
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  • Testimonial Smothering and Domestic Violence Disclosure in Clinical Contexts.Jack Warman - forthcoming - Episteme:1-18.
    Domestic violence and abuse are at last coming to be recognised as serious global public health problems. Nevertheless, many women with personal histories of DVA decline to disclose them to healthcare practitioners. In the health sciences, recent empirical work has identified many factors that impede DVA disclosure, known as barriers to disclosure. Drawing on recent work in social epistemology on testimonial silencing, we might wonder why so many people withhold their testimony and whether there is some kind of epistemic injustice (...)
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  • The Hermeneutics of Symptoms.Alistair Wardrope & Markus Reuber - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (3):395-412.
    The clinical encounter begins with presentation of an illness experience; but throughout that encounter, something else is constructed from it – a symptom. The symptom is a particular interpretation of that experience, useful for certain purposes in particular contexts. The hermeneutics of medicine – the study of the interpretation of human experience in medical terms – has largely taken the process of symptom-construction to be transparent, focussing instead on how constellations of symptoms are interpreted as representative of particular conditions. This (...)
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  • Legibility as a Design Principle: Surfacing Values in Sensing Technologies.Jeroen van den Hoven, John Bolte, Taylor Stone & Holly Robbins - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (5):1104-1135.
    This paper introduces the design principle of legibility as means to examine the epistemic and ethical conditions of sensing technologies. Emerging sensing technologies create new possibilities regarding what to measure, as well as how to analyze, interpret, and communicate said measurements. In doing so, they create ethical challenges for designers to navigate, specifically how the interpretation and communication of complex data affect moral values such as autonomy. Contemporary sensing technologies require layers of mediation and exposition to render what they sense (...)
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  • Asking the Right Questions: Towards a Person-Centered Conception of Shared Decision-Making Regarding Treatment of Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Older Patients.Johannes J. M. van Delden, Willem Jan W. Bos, Anne M. Stiggelbout & Wouter R. Verberne - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-8.
    An increasing number of older patients have to decide on a treatment plan for advanced chronic kidney disease, involving dialysis or conservative care. Shared decision-making is recommended as the model for decision-making in such preference-sensitive decisions. The aim of SDM is to come to decisions that are consistent with the patient’s values and preferences and made by the patient and healthcare professional working together. In clinical practice, however, SDM appears to be not yet routine and needs further implementation. A shift (...)
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  • Epistemic Injustice in Late-Stage Dementia: A Case for Non-Verbal Testimonial Injustice.Lucienne Spencer - 2022 - Social Epistemology 1.
    The literature on epistemic injustice has thus far confined the concept of testimonial injustice to speech expressions such as inquiring, discussing, deliberating, and, above all, telling. I propose that it is time to broaden the horizons of testimonial injustice to include a wider range of expressions. Controversially, the form of communication I have in mind is non-verbal expression. Non-verbal expression is a vital, though often overlooked, form of communication, particularly for people who have certain neurocognitive disorders. Dependency upon non-verbal expression (...)
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  • Illness and Disease: An Empirical-Ethical Viewpoint.Anna-Henrikje Seidlein & Sabine Salloch - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):5.
    The concepts of disease, illness and sickness capture fundamentally different aspects of phenomena related to human ailments and healthcare. The philosophy and theory of medicine are making manifold efforts to capture the essence and normative implications of these concepts. In parallel, socio-empirical studies on patients’ understanding of their situation have yielded a comprehensive body of knowledge regarding subjective perspectives on health-related statuses. Although both scientific fields provide varied valuable insights, they have not been strongly linked to each other. Therefore, the (...)
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  • Stop the Bleeding: We Must Combat Explicit as Well as Implicit Biases Affecting Women Surgeons.Brandi Braud Scully - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (4):244-245.
    When I was a 7 months pregnant medical student, an attending surgeon asked me to which specialty I would be applying. When I replied that I was hoping to match in general surgery, he touched my pregnant abdomen and said, “Not with that you’re not.” I am not alone. Gender bias and discrimination have been shown to negatively impact women surgeons throughout their careers and deter women from even applying in surgical fields.1 Bias against female surgical trainees leads to less (...)
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  • Capable Deliberators: Towards Inclusion of Minority Minds in Discourse Practices.Thomas Schramme - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy.
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  • Commercial mHealth Apps and Unjust Value Trade-Offs: A Public Health Perspective.Leon W. S. Rossmaier - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics.
    Mobile health apps for self-monitoring increasingly gain relevance for public health. As a mobile technology, they promote individual participation in health monitoring with the aim of disease prevention and the mitigation of health risks. In this paper, I argue that users of mHealth apps must engage in value trade-offs concerning their fundamental dimensions of well-being when using mobile health apps for the self-monitoring of health parameters. I particularly focus on trade-offs regarding the user’s self-determination as well as their capacity to (...)
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  • Unsolicited Diagnosis of Mental Disorder: Epistemic and Normative Perspectives.Gustav Preller, Anna-Henrikje Seidlein & Sabine Salloch - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (5):34-35.
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  • Epistemic Solidarity in Medicine and Healthcare.Mirjam Pot - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (4):681-692.
    In this article, I apply the concept of solidarity to collective knowledge practices in healthcare. Generally, solidarity acknowledges that people are dependent on each other in many respects, and it captures those support practices that people engage in out of concern for others in whom they recognise a relevant similarity. Drawing on the rich literature on solidarity in bioethics and beyond, this article specifically discusses the role that epistemic solidarity can play in healthcare. It thus focuses, in particular, on solidarity’s (...)
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  • Contributory Injustice in Psychiatry.Alex James Miller Tate - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):97-100.
    I explain the notion of contributory injustice, a kind of epistemic injustice, and argue that it occurs within psychiatric services, affecting those who hear voices. I argue that individual effort on the part of clinicians to avoid perpetrating this injustice is an insufficient response to the problem; mitigating the injustice will require open and meaningful dialogue between clinicians and service user organisations, as well as individuals. I suggest that clinicians must become familiar with and take seriously concepts and frameworks for (...)
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  • Why Didn't You Scream? Epistemic Injustices of Sexism, Misogyny and Rape Myths.Alison MacKenzie - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophy of Education.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
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  • A Crip Queer Dialogue on Sickness.Corinne Lajoie & Emily Douglas - 2020 - Puncta 3 (2):1-14.
    Editors' introduction to the Puncta special issue on "Critically Sick: New Phenomenologies Of Illness, Madness, And Disability.".
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  • Being at Home: A Feminist Phenomenology of Disorientation in Illness.Corinne Lajoie - 2019 - Hypatia 34 (3):546-569.
    This article explores the relation among illness, home, and belonging. Through a feminist phenomenological framework, I describe the disorientations of being diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and living with mental illness. This research anticipates the consequences of illness and serious disorientations for a conception of belonging as seamless body–world compatibility. Instead, this article examines how the stability of bodily dwellings in experiences of disorientation can suggest ways of being in the world that are more attentive to interdependency, unpredictability, and change (...)
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  • Continuous Glucose Monitoring as a Matter of Justice.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (4):345-370.
    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic illness that requires intensive lifelong management of blood glucose concentrations by means of external insulin administration. There have been substantial developments in the ways of measuring glucose levels, which is crucial to T1D self-management. Recently, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has allowed people with T1D to keep track of their blood glucose levels in near real-time. These devices have alarms that warn users about potentially dangerous blood glucose trends, which can often be shared with (...)
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  • Pathophobia, Illness, and Vices.Ian James Kidd - 2019 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 27 (2):286-306.
    I introduce the concept pathophobia, to capture the range of morally objectionable forms of treatment to which somatically ill persons are subjected. After distinguishing this concept from sanism and ableism, I argue that the moral wrongs of pathophobia are best analysed using a framework of vice ethics. To that end I describe five clusters of pathophobic vices and failings, illustrating each with examples from three influential illness narratives.
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  • Healthcare Practice, Epistemic Injustice, and Naturalism.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84:1-23.
    Ill persons suffer from a variety of epistemically-inflected harms and wrongs. Many of these are interpretable as specific forms of what we dub pathocentric epistemic injustices, these being ones that target and track ill persons. We sketch the general forms of pathocentric testimonial and hermeneutical injustice, each of which are pervasive within the experiences of ill persons during their encounters in healthcare contexts and the social world. What’s epistemically unjust might not be only agents, communities and institutions, but the theoretical (...)
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  • Intégrer des Patients Experts, Patients Partenaires, Patients Formateurs Ou Cochercheurs En Cancérologie : Une Démocratie En Santé Encore Incertaine.Béatrice Jacques - 2022 - Dialogue 61 (1):33-53.
    In France, the Kouchner law of 2002 has allowed for a rethinking of patients’ rights; as well, it introduced the notion of health democracy. For example, in oncology, advocacy groups for patients and ex-patients now provide support and information to patients, representation of patients in health care institutions and state agencies, education to caregivers, and opportunities for participation in research. In fact, such advocacy groups have been so impactful that some patients have gone on to work in the health care (...)
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  • Institutional Opacity, Epistemic Vulnerability, and Institutional Testimonial Justice.Carel Havi & Ian James Kidd - 2021 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 29 (4):473-496.
    ABSTRACT This paper offers an account of institutional testimonial justice and describes one way that it breaks down, which we call institutional opacity. An institution is opaque when it becomes resistant to epistemic evaluation and understanding by its agents and users. When one cannot understand the inner workings of an institution, it becomes difficult to know how to comport oneself testimonially. We offer an account of an institutional ethos to explain what it means for an institution to be testimonially just; (...)
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  • Conditions d'Une Démocratie En Santé d'Ordre Maximaliste.Olivia Gross - 2022 - Dialogue 61 (1):17-32.
    The motivations of health service users and health care professionals to engage in participative practices differ. Health service users want to improve the patient experience by reducing epistemic injustices and increasing well-being, from a social justice perspective. Six motivations underlying participation co-exist. However, the compatibility of these motivations is not obvious. Moreover, democracy in health care has become protean and tensions are appearing between representative democracy and participatory democracy, of the indirect type. Combining the epistemic profiles of users with the (...)
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  • Injusticia epistémica e ignorancia institucional. El caso de Samba Martine.Andrea Greppi & Rosana Triviño Caballero - 2021 - Las Torres de Lucca: Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política 10 (19):15-28.
    En diciembre de 2011, Samba Martine, interna del Centro de Internamiento para Extranjeros de Aluche, muere de una infección evitable por no haber sido diagnosticada y tratada de manera adecuada, a pesar de haber solicitado insistentemente asistencia sanitaria. La madre de Samba, con el apoyo de varias entidades sociales, denuncia los hechos y llega a los tribunales. Ocho años más tarde, en junio de 2019, se anuncia la absolución por homicidio imprudente del único responsable procesado. Nueve años más tarde, en (...)
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  • Responding to Sanist Microaggressions with Acts of Epistemic Resistance.Abigail Gosselin - 2022 - Hypatia 37 (2):293-314.
    People who have mental health diagnoses are often subject to sanist microaggressions in which pejorative terms to describe mental illness are used to represent that which is discreditable. Such microaggressions reflect and perpetrate stigma against severe mental illness, often held unconsciously as implicit bias. In this article, I examine the sanist attitudes that underlie sanist microaggressions, analyzing some of the cognitive biases that support mental illness stigma. Then I consider what responsibility we have with respect to microaggressions. I argue that (...)
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  • “Clinician Knows Best”? Injustices in the Medicalization of Mental Illness.Abigail Gosselin - 2019 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 5 (2).
    This paper uses a non-ideal theory approach advocated for by Alison Jaggar to show that practices involved with the medicalization of serious mental disorders can subject people who have these disorders to a cycle of vulnerability that keeps them trapped within systems of injustice. When medicalization locates mental disorders solely as problems of individual biology, without regard to social factors, and when it treats mental disorders as personal defects, it perpetuates injustice in several ways: by enabling biased diagnoses through stereotyping, (...)
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  • Moral Encroachment and the Epistemic Impermissibility of (Some) Microaggressions.Javiera Perez Gomez - 2021 - Synthese 199 (3-4):9237-9256.
    A recent flurry of philosophical research on microaggression suggests that there are various practical and moral reasons why microaggression may be objectionable, including that it can be offensive, cause epistemic harms, express demeaning messages about certain members of our society, and help to reproduce an oppressive social order. Yet little attention has been given to the question of whether microaggression is also epistemically objectionable. This paper aims to further our understanding of microaggression by appealing to recent work on moral encroachment—the (...)
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  • Epistemic Disadvantage.Rena Beatrice Goldstein - 2022 - Philosophia 50 (4):1861-1878.
    Recent philosophical literature on epistemic harms has paid little attention to the difference between deliberate and non-deliberate harms. In this paper, I analyze the “Curare Case,” a case from the 1940’s in which patient testimony was disregarded by physicians. This case has been described as an instance of epistemic injustice. I problematize this description, arguing instead that the case shows an instance of “epistemic disadvantage.” I propose epistemic disadvantage indicates when harms result from warranted asymmetric relations that justifiably exclude individuals (...)
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  • Wrongful Medicalization and Epistemic Injustice in Psychiatry: The Case of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.Anne-Marie Gagné-Julien - 2021 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 17 (2):(S4)5-36.
    In this paper, my goal is to use an epistemic injustice framework to extend an existing normative analysis of over-medicalization to psychiatry and thus draw attention to overlooked injustices. Kaczmarek has developed a promising bioethical and pragmatic approach to over-medicalization, which consists of four guiding questions covering issues related to the harms and benefits of medicalization. In a nutshell, if we answer “yes” to all proposed questions, then it is a case of over-medicalization. Building on an epistemic injustice framework, I (...)
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  • Le corps comme Autre : violence épistémique auto-infligée dans l’expérience de l’anorexie mentale.Cécile Gagnon - 2022 - Philosophiques 49 (1):209-226.
    Dans ce texte, je suggère que les personnes souffrant d’anorexie mentale s’infligent une forme particulière de violence épistémique lorsqu’elles ignorent volontairement les symptômes de leur maladie. Pour ce faire, dans une démarche inspirée par celle de Havi Carel, je présente d’abord le rapport particulier qu’entretiennent les personnes souffrant d’anorexie avec leur corps, et ce, à l’aide de trois axes d’analyse empruntés à Susan Bordo, soit le dualisme Corps/Esprit, les idéaux de contrôle et d’autonomie, et les rapports de genre. Je propose (...)
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  • Conceptos de injusticia epistémica en evolución.Miranda Fricker - 2021 - Las Torres de Lucca: Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política 10 (19):97-104.
    Este texto es la traducción del capítulo cuarto de The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice, editado por Ian James Kidd, José Medina y Gaile Pohlhaus Jr. En él, Miranda Fricker aclara y delimita los conceptos de injusticia hermenéutica y testimonial, proporcionando ejemplos, narrando su genealogía, respondiendo a algunas de las críticas que recibieron estos conceptos, así como estableciendo relaciones de semejanza y contraste con otras concepciones de la justicia y otras ramas de la filosofía.
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  • Testimoniale Ungerechtigkeit gegenüber Menschen mit psychischer Erkrankung in der Gesundheitsversorgung. Eine konzeptionelle und ethische Analyse.Mirjam Faissner, Georg Juckel & Jakov Gather - 2022 - Ethik in der Medizin 34 (2):145-160.
    Menschen mit psychischer Erkrankung sterben statistisch gesehen früher als die Allgemeinbevölkerung. Ein Grund hierfür ist, dass sie eine schlechtere somatische Gesundheitsversorgung erhalten. Wir argumentieren, dass ableistische Netzwerke sozialer Bedeutung zu einer Abwertung der epistemischen Kompetenz von Menschen mit psychischer Erkrankung führen. Diese Abwertung kann mit dem Konzept der testimonialen Ungerechtigkeit erfasst werden. Testimoniale Ungerechtigkeit bezeichnet das ungerechtfertigte Herabstufen der Glaubwürdigkeit einer*s Sprecher*in aufgrund eines Vorurteils gegen ihre*seine soziale Identität. Wir analysieren ethische und epistemische Folgen testimonialer Ungerechtigkeit als wichtige Ursachen der (...)
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  • "A Little of Her Language": Epistemic Injustice and Mental Disability.Josh Dohmen - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (4):669-691.
    In this essay, I argue that certain injustices faced by mentally disabled persons are epistemic injustices by drawing upon epistemic injustice literature, especially as it is developed by Miranda Fricker. First, I explain the terminology and arguments developed by Fricker, Gaile Pohlhaus, Jr., and Kristie Dotson that are useful in theorizing epistemic injustices against mentally disabled people. Second, I consider some specific cases of epistemic injustice to which mentally disabled persons are subject. Third, I turn to a discussion of severely (...)
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  • Testifying Bodies: Testimonial Injustice as Derivatization.Carolyn M. Cusick - 2019 - Social Epistemology 33 (2):111-123.
    Human beings as objects, and we are objects inter alia, offer information, even knowledge. And yet, in a society marked by pervasive identity prejudice, even objects do not offer neutral facts. Here, I argue that the harms imposed on those who suffer testimonial injustices cannot be sufficiently understood through the ethical lens of objectification. Such persons are not simply objectified, not simply treated as mere sources of information rather than as informants. Even as objects (not mere objects), they are often (...)
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  • Disability, Epistemic Harms, and the Quality-Adjusted Life Year.Laura M. Cupples - 2020 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 13 (1):46-62.
    Health policymakers employ utility measures to inform resource allocation decisions. They often rely on a conceptual tool called the quality-adjusted life year that discounts the value of years lived in a state of disability relative to years lived in full health. A representative sample of the general public is asked to place values on hypothetical health states as part of a standard gamble or time trade-off task. Policymakers use the resulting values to calculate the number of QALYs gained through particular (...)
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  • Structural Health Vulnerability: Health Inequalities, Structural and Epistemic Injustice.Ryoa Chung - 2021 - Journal of Social Philosophy 52 (2):201-216.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  • Pathology as a phenomenological tool.Havi Carel - 2021 - Continental Philosophy Review 54 (2):201-217.
    The phenomenological method has been fruitfully used to study the experience of illness in recent years. However, the role of illness is not merely that of a passive object for phenomenological scrutiny. I propose that illness, and pathology more generally, can be developed into a phenomenological method in their own right. I claim that studying cases of pathology, breakdown, and illness offer illumination not only of these experiences, but also of normal function and the tacit background that underpins it. In (...)
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  • Epistemic Injustice in Healthcare Encounters: Evidence From Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.Havi Carel, Charlotte Blease & Keith Geraghty - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (8):549-557.
    Chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis remains a controversial illness category. This paper surveys the state of knowledge and attitudes about this illness and proposes that epistemic concerns about the testimonial credibility of patients can be articulated using Miranda Fricker’s concept of epistemic injustice. While there is consensus within mainstream medical guidelines that there is no known cause of CFS/ME, there is continued debate about how best to conceive of CFS/ME, including disagreement about how to interpret clinical studies of treatments. (...)
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  • Diagnostic Overshadowing in Psychiatric-Somatic Comorbidity: A Case for Structural Testimonial Injustice.Anke Bueter - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-21.
    People with mental illnesses have higher prevalence and mortality rates with regard to common somatic diseases and causes of death, such as cardio-vascular conditions or cancer. One factor contributing to this excess morbidity and mortality is the sub-standard level of physical healthcare offered to the mentally ill. In particular, they are often subject to diagnostic overshadowing: a tendency to attribute physical symptoms to a pre-existing diagnosis of mental illness. This might be seen as an unfortunate instance of epistemic bad luck, (...)
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  • Epistemic Injustice and Psychiatric Classification.Anke Bueter - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 86 (5):1064-1074.
    This article supports calls for an increased integration of patients into taxonomic decision making in psychiatry by arguing that their exclusion constitutes a special kind of epistemic injustice: preemptive testimonial injustice, which precludes the opportunity for testimony due to a wrongly presumed irrelevance or lack of expertise. Here, this presumption is misguided for two reasons: the role of values in psychiatric classification and the potential function of first-person knowledge as a corrective means against implicitly value-laden, inaccurate, or incomplete diagnostic criteria (...)
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  • The Seeing Place: Talking Theatre and Medicine.Deborah Bowman & Joanna Bowman - 2018 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 17 (1):166-181.
    A Professor of Medical Ethics and a theatre director, also mother and daughter, talk about health, illness, suffering, performance and practice. Using the lenses of ethical and performance theory, they explore what it means to be a patient, a spectator and a practitioner and cover many plays, texts and productions: Samuel Beckett’s Not I and All That Fall, Sarah Kane’s Crave, Tim Crouch’s An Oak Tree, Enda Walsh’s Ballyturk, Annie Ryan’s adaptation of Eimear McBride’s novel A Girl Is a Half-Formed (...)
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  • The Moral of the Tale: Stories, Trust, and Public Engagement with Clinical Ethics Via Radio and Theatre.Deborah Bowman - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):43-52.
    Trust is frequently discussed with reference to the professional–patient relationship. However, trust is less explored in relation to the ways in which understanding of, and responses to, questions of ethics are discussed by both the “public” and “experts.” Public engagement activity in healthcare ethics may invoke “trust” in analysing a moral question or problem but less frequently conceives of trust as integral to “public engagement” itself. This paper explores the relationship between trust and the ways in which questions of healthcare (...)
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  • Contemporary Artists’ Books and the Intimate Aesthetics of Illness.Stella Bolaki - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):21-39.
    This essay brings together critical perspectives from the discrete traditions of artists’ books and the medical humanities to examine artists’ books by three contemporary artists – Penny Alexander, Martha A. Hall and Amanda Watson-Will – that treat experiences of illness and wellbeing. Through its focus on a multimodal and multisensory art form that has allegiances with, but is not reduced to, narrative, the essay adds to recent calls to rethink key assumptions of illness narrative study and to challenge utilitarian approaches. (...)
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  • Need for Patient-Developed Concepts of Empowerment to Rectify Epistemic Injustice and Advance Person-Centred Care.Brenda Bogaert - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):e15-e15.
    The dominant discourse in chronic disease management centres on the ideal of person-centred healthcare, with an empowered patient taking an active role in decision-making with their healthcare provider. Despite these encouraging developments toward healthcare democracy, many person-centred conceptions of healthcare and programming continue to focus on the healthcare institution’s perspective and priorities. In these debates, the patient’s voice has largely been absent. This article takes the example of patient empowerment to show how the concept has been influenced by a variety (...)
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  • Patients, Clinicians and Open Notes: Information Blocking as a Case of Epistemic Injustice.Charlotte Blease, Liz Salmi, Hanife Rexhepi, Maria Hägglund & Catherine M. DesRoches - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (10):785-793.
    In many countries, including patients are legally entitled to request copies of their clinical notes. However, this process remains time-consuming and burdensome, and it remains unclear how much of the medical record must be made available. Online access to notes offers a way to overcome these challenges and in around 10 countries worldwide, via secure web-based portals, many patients are now able to read at least some of the narrative reports written by clinicians. However, even in countries that have implemented (...)
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  • Patients, Clinicians and Open Notes: Information Blocking as a Case of Epistemic Injustice.Charlotte Blease, Liz Salmi, Hanife Rexhepi, Maria Hägglund & Catherine M. DesRoches - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (10):785-793.
    In many countries, including patients are legally entitled to request copies of their clinical notes. However, this process remains time-consuming and burdensome, and it remains unclear how much of the medical record must be made available. Online access to notes offers a way to overcome these challenges and in around 10 countries worldwide, via secure web-based portals, many patients are now able to read at least some of the narrative reports written by clinicians. However, even in countries that have implemented (...)
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  • Are ME/CFS Patient Organizations “Militant”?Charlotte Blease & Keith J. Geraghty - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):393-401.
    Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome is a contested illness category. This paper investigates the common claim that patients with ME/CFS—and by extension, ME/CFS patient organizations —exhibit “militant” social and political tendencies. The paper opens with a history of the protracted scientific disagreement over ME/CFS. We observe that ME/CFS POs, medical doctors, and medical researchers exhibit clear differences in opinion over how to conceptualize this illness. However, we identify a common trope in the discourse over ME/CFS: the claim of “militant” (...)
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  • Epistemic Vices in Organizations: Knowledge, Truth, and Unethical Conduct.Christopher Baird & Thomas S. Calvard - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (1):263-276.
    Recognizing that truth is socially constructed or that knowledge and power are related is hardly a novelty in the social sciences. In the twenty-first century, however, there appears to be a renewed concern regarding people’s relationship with the truth and the propensity for certain actors to undermine it. Organizations are highly implicated in this, given their central roles in knowledge management and production and their attempts to learn, although the entanglement of these epistemological issues with business ethics has not been (...)
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  • The Practical Origins of Ideas: Genealogy as Conceptual Reverse-Engineering (Open Access).Matthieu Queloz - 2021 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Why did such highly abstract ideas as truth, knowledge, or justice become so important to us? What was the point of coming to think in these terms? This book presents a philosophical method designed to answer such questions: the method of pragmatic genealogy. Pragmatic genealogies are partly fictional, partly historical narratives exploring what might have driven us to develop certain ideas in order to discover what these do for us. The book uncovers an under-appreciated tradition of pragmatic genealogy which cuts (...)
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