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  1. Speaker Meaning, What is Said, and What is Implicated.Jennifer M. Saul - 2002 - Noûs 36 (2):228–248.
    [First Paragraph] Unlike so many other distinctions in philosophy, H P Grice's distinction between what is said and what is implicated has an immediate appeal: undergraduate students readily grasp that one who says 'someone shot my parents' has merely implicated rather than said that he was not the shooter [2]. It seems to capture things that we all really pay attention to in everyday conversation'this is why there are so many people whose entire sense of humour consists of deliberately ignoring (...)
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  • What Should Research Participants Understand to Understand They Are Participants in Research?David Wendler & Christine Grady - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (4):203–208.
    To give valid informed consent to participate in clinical research, potential participants should understand the risks, potential benefits, procedures, and alternatives. Potential participants also should understand that they are being invited to participate in research. Yet it is unclear what potential participants need to understand to satisfy this particular requirement. As a result, it is unclear what additional information investigators should disclose about the research; and it is also unclear when failures of understanding in this respect undermine the validity of (...)
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  • Informed Consent and the Requirement to Ensure Understanding.Tom Walker - 2012 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):50-62.
    It is generally held that doctors and researchers have an obligation to obtain informed consent. Over time there has been a move in relation to this obligation from a requirement to disclose information to a requirement to ensure that that information is understood. Whilst this change has been resisted, in this article I argue that both sides on this matter are mistaken. When investigating what information is needed for consent to be informed we might be trying to determine what information (...)
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  • The Ontology of Consent: A Reply to Alexander.Richard Healey - 2015 - Analytic Philosophy 56 (4):354-363.
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  • Saying, Meaning, and Implicating.Kent Bach - 2012 - In Keith Allan & Kasia Jaszczolt (eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Pragmatics. Cambridge University Press.
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  • The Ontology of Consent.Larry Alexander - 2014 - Analytic Philosophy 55 (1):102-113.
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  • Yes Means Yes: Consent as Communication.Tom Dougherty - 2015 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 43 (3):224-253.
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  • Common Ground.Robert C. Stalnaker - 2002 - Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (5-6):701-721.
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  • Studies in the Way of Words.H. P. Grice - 1989 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
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  • Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - Harvard University Press.
    In this masterful work, both an illumination of Kant's thought and an important contribution to contemporary legal and political theory, Arthur Ripstein gives a comprehensive yet accessible account of Kant's political philosophy. In addition to providing a clear and coherent statement of the most misunderstood of Kant's ideas, Ripstein also shows that Kant's views remain conceptually powerful and morally appealing today.
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  • Meaning.H. Paul Grice - 1957 - Philosophical Review 66 (3):377-388.
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  • Consent Does Not Require Communication: A Reply to Dougherty.Larry Alexander, Heidi Hurd & Peter Westen - 2016 - Law and Philosophy 35 (6):655-660.
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  • Autonomy and Trust in Bioethics.Onora O'Neill - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Why has autonomy been a leading idea in philosophical writing on bioethics, and why has trust been marginal? In this important book, Onora O'Neill suggests that the conceptions of individual autonomy so widely relied on in bioethics are philosophically and ethically inadequate, and that they undermine rather than support relations of trust. She shows how Kant's non-individualistic view of autonomy provides a stronger basis for an approach to medicine, science and biotechnology, and does not marginalize untrustworthiness, while also explaining why (...)
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  • The Moral Magic of Consent: Heidi M. Hurd.Heidi M. Hurd - 1996 - Legal Theory 2 (2):121-146.
    We regularly wield powers that, upon close scrutiny, appear remarkably magical. By sheer exercise of will, we bring into existence things that have never existed before. With but a nod, we effect the disappearance of things that have long served as barriers to the actions of others. And, by mere resolve, we generate things that pose significant obstacles to others' exercise of liberty. What is the nature of these things that we create and destroy by our mere decision to do (...)
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  • Informed Consent to HIV Cure Research.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph R. Millum - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (2):108-113.
    Trials with highly unfavourable risk–benefit ratios for participants, like HIV cure trials, raise questions about the quality of the consent of research participants. Why, it may be asked, would a person with HIV who is doing well on antiretroviral therapy be willing to jeopardise his health by enrolling in such a trial? We distinguish three concerns: first, how information is communicated to potential participants; second, participants’ motivations for enrolling in potentially high risk research with no prospect of direct benefit; and (...)
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  • Understanding, Interests and Informed Consent: A Reply to Sreenivasan.Danielle Bromwich - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (4):327-331.
    It is widely agreed that the view of informed consent found in the regulations and guidelines struggles to keep pace with the ever-advancing enterprise of human subjects research. Over the last 10 years, there have been serious attempts to rethink informed consent so that it conforms to our considered judgments about cases where we are confident valid consent has been given. These arguments are influenced by an argument from Gopal Sreenivasan, which apparently shows that a potential participant's consent to research (...)
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  • Declaration of Helsinki. Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects.World Medical Association - 2009 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1):233-238.
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  • Disclosure and Consent to Medical Research Participation.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph Millum - 2015 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 12 (2):195-219.
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  • Disclosure and Consent to Medical Research Participation.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph Millum - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):195-219.
    Most regulations and guidelines require that potential research participants be told a great deal of information during the consent process. Many of these documents, and most of the scholars who consider the consent process, assume that all this information must be disclosed because it must all be understood. However, a wide range of studies surveying apparently competent participants in clinical trials around the world show that many do not understand key aspects of what they have been told. The standard view (...)
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  • A History and Theory of Informed Consent.William G. Bartholome - 1988 - Ethics 98 (3):605-606.
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  • “The Moral Magic of Consent.Larry Alexander - 1996 - Legal Theory 2 (3):165-174.
    I begin my analysis of consent by agreeing with Professor Hurd that consent functions as a “moral transformative” by altering the obligations and permissions that determine the Tightness of others' actions. I further agree with her that consent is intimately related to the capacity for autonomous action; one who cannot alter others' obligations through consent is not fully autonomous. I cannot improve on her elaboration of these points.
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  • Using Informed Consent to Save Trust.Nir Eyal - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (7):437-444.
    Increasingly, bioethicists defend informed consent as a safeguard for trust in caretakers and medical institutions. This paper discusses an ‘ideal type’ of that move. What I call the trust-promotion argument for informed consent states:1. Social trust, especially trust in caretakers and medical institutions, is necessary so that, for example, people seek medical advice, comply with it, and participate in medical research.2. Therefore, it is usually wrong to jeopardise that trust.3. Coercion, deception, manipulation and other violations of standard informed consent requirements (...)
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  • Does Informed Consent to Research Require Comprehension?Gopal Sreenivasan - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1:85-93.
    According to the standard view of informed consent, a prospective subject's consent to participate in a research study is invalid if the individual fails to comprehend the information about the study standardly disclosed to him. I argue that this involves three mistakes. First, the standard view confuses an ethical aspiration with a minimum ethical standard. Second, it assigns the entire responsibility for producing comprehension in study participants to the investigators. Most importantly, the standard view requires the termination of many otherwise (...)
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  • Shading the Truth in Seeking Informed Consent for Research Purposes.Sissela Bok - 1995 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 5 (1):1-17.
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  • Disclosure and Consent to Medical Research Participation.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph Millum - 2014 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4).
    Most regulations and guidelines require that potential research participants be told a great deal of information during the consent process. Many of these documents, and most of the scholars who consider the consent process, assume that all this information must be disclosed because it must all be understood. However, a wide range of studies surveying apparently competent participants in clinical trials around the world show that many do not understand key aspects of what they have been told. The standard view (...)
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  • Consent to Sexual Relations.Alan Wertheimer - 2006 - Law and Philosophy 25 (2):267-287.
    When does a woman give valid consent to sexual relations? When does her consent render it morally or legally permissible for a man to have sexual relations with her? Why is sexual consent generally regarded as an issue about female consent? And what is the moral significance of consent? These are some of the questions discussed in this important book, which will appeal to a wide readership in philosophy, law, and the social sciences. Alan Wertheimer develops a theory of consent (...)
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  • Philosophical Justifications of Informed Consent in Research.D. Brock, E. J. Emanuel, C. Grady, R. Lie, F. Miller & D. Wendler - 2008 - In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  • Index.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press. pp. 389-399.
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