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  1. Moral Realism and Moral Dilemma.Philippa Foot - 1983 - Journal of Philosophy 80 (7):379-398.
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  • Jus Ad Bellum and an Officer’s Moral Obligations: Invincible Ignorance, the Constitution, and Iraq.J. Joseph Miller - 2004 - Social Theory and Practice 30 (4):457-484.
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  • Just and Unjust Wars.Michael Walzer - 1977 - New York: Basic Books.
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  • Blameworthiness and Obligation.R. B. Brandt - 1958 - In A. I. Melden (ed.), Essays in Moral Philosophy. University of Washington Press.
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  • Jus Post Bellum.Gary J. Bass - 2004 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 32 (4):384-412.
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  • Freedom of the Will.JONATHAN EDWARDS - 1957 - Franklin Library.
    Eighteenth-century theologian_Jonathan Edwards remains a significant influence on modern religion, and this book constitutes his most important contribution to Christian thought. Edwards_raises timeless questions about desire, choice, good, and evil, contrasting the opposing Calvinist and Arminian views of free will and addressing issues related to God's foreknowledge, determinism, and moral agency.
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  • Selective Moral Disengagement in the Exercise of Moral Agency.Albert Bandura - 2002 - Journal of Moral Education 31 (2):101-119.
    Moral agency has dual aspects manifested in both the power to refrain from behaving inhumanely and the proactive power to behave humanely. Moral agency is embedded in a broader socio-cognitive self-theory encompassing affective self-regulatory mechanisms rooted in personal standards linked to self-sanctions. Moral functioning is thus governed by self-reactive selfhood rather than by dispassionate abstract reasoning. The self-regulatory mechanisms governing moral conduct do not come into play unless they are activated and there are many psychosocial mechanisms by which moral self-sanctions (...)
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  • Sincerity, Accuracy and Selective Conscientious Objection.Mark Navin - 2013 - Journal of Military Ethics 12 (2):111 - 128.
    Conscientious objectors to military service are either general objectors or selective objectors. The former object to all wars; the latter object to only some wars. There is widespread popular and political support in western liberal democracies for exemptions for general objectors, but currently there is little support for exemptions for selective objectors. Many who advocate exemptions for selective objectors attempt to build upon the strength of support that is enjoyed by exemptions for general objectors. They argue that selective objectors ? (...)
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  • On the Moral Equality of Combatants.Jeff McMahan - 2006 - Journal of Political Philosophy 14 (4):377–393.
    THERE’S a well-known scene in Shakespeare’s Henry V in which the King, disguised as an ordinary soldier, is conversing with some of his soldiers on the eve of the battle of Agincourt. Hoping to find or inspire support among them, he remarks: “Methinks I could not die anywhere so contented as in the King’s company, his cause being just and his quarrel honorable.” One soldier replies: “That’s more than we know,” whereupon a second says: “Ay, or more than we should (...)
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  • The Voice of Conscience.J. David Velleman - 1999 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 99 (1):57–76.
    I reconstruct Kant's derivation of the Categorical Imperative (CI) as an argument that deduces what the voice of conscience must say from how it must sound - that is, from the authority that is metaphorically attributed to conscience in the form of a resounding voice. The idea of imagining the CI as the voice of conscience comes from Freud; and the present reconstruction is part of a larger project that aims to reconcile Kant's moral psychology with Freud's theory of moral (...)
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  • The Enlightened Grunt? Invincible Ignorance in the Just War Tradition.Andrew Sola - 2009 - Journal of Military Ethics 8 (1):48-65.
    This essay addresses one of the central questions in the ongoing debate about just war theory: are soldiers morally responsible for serving in unjust wars? Francisco de Vitoria addressed this question in the sixteenth century using the concepts of invincible and vincible ignorance. He excused soldiers serving in unjust wars, if they did not know the war was unjust and if they did not have the means to overcome their ignorance; if they had the means, they were morally culpable. In (...)
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  • Just and Unjust Wars: A Moral Argument with Historical Illustrations.Barrie Paskins & Michael Walzer - 1981 - Philosophical Quarterly 31 (124):285.
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  • “Moral Residue and Dilemmas” En Mason, 1996. Ed.Terrance C. McConnell - 1996 - In H. E. Mason (ed.), Moral Dilemmas and Moral Theory. Oxford University Press. pp. 36--47.
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  • Just and Unjust Wars.M. Walzer - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (209):415-420.
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  • Allgemeine Ethik.Friedo Ricken - 1984 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 38 (4):677-679.
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