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Synesthesia vs. crossmodal illusions

In Ophelia Deroy (ed.), Sensory Blendings: New Essays on Synaesthesia. Oxford, UK: pp. 45-58 (2017)

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  1. Synesthesia and Learning: A Critical Review and Novel Theory.Marcus R. Watson, Kathleen A. Akins, Chris Spiker, Lyle Crawford & James T. Enns - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
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  • Synaesthesia: A Window Into Perception, Thought and Language.Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Edward M. Hubbard - 2001 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (12):3-34.
    (1) The induced colours led to perceptual grouping and pop-out, (2) a grapheme rendered invisible through ‘crowding’ or lateral masking induced synaesthetic colours — a form of blindsight — and (3) peripherally presented graphemes did not induce colours even when they were clearly visible. Taken collectively, these and other experiments prove conclusively that synaesthesia is a genuine percep- tual phenomenon, not an effect based on memory associations from childhood or on vague metaphorical speech. We identify different subtypes of number–colour synaesthesia (...)
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  • The Chemical Senses.Barry C. Smith - 2015 - In Mohan Matthen (ed.), The Oxford Handbook to Philosophy of Perception. New York, NY, USA: pp. 314-353.
    Long-standing neglect of the chemical senses in the philosophy of perception is due, mostly, to their being regarded as ‘lower’ senses. Smell, taste, and chemically irritated touch are thought to produce mere bodily sensations. However, empirically informed theories of perception can show how these senses lead to perception of objective properties, and why they cannot be treated as special cases of perception modelled on vision. The senses of taste, touch, and smell also combine to create unified perceptions of flavour. The (...)
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  • The Phenomenology of Synaesthesia.Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Edward M. Hubbard - 2003 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (8):49-57.
    This article supplements our earlier paper on synaesthesia published in JCS (Ramachandran & Hubbard, 2001a). We discuss the phenomenology of synaesthesia in greater detail, raise several new questions that have emerged from recent studies, and suggest some tentative answers to these questions.
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  • Grapheme-Color Synaesthesia Benefits Rule-Based Category Learning.Marcus R. Watson, Mark R. Blair, Pavel Kozik, Kathleen A. Akins & James T. Enns - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1533-1540.
    Researchers have long suspected that grapheme-color synaesthesia is useful, but research on its utility has so far focused primarily on episodic memory and perceptual discrimination. Here we ask whether it can be harnessed during rule-based Category learning. Participants learned through trial and error to classify grapheme pairs that were organized into categories on the basis of their associated synaesthetic colors. The performance of synaesthetes was similar to non-synaesthetes viewing graphemes that were physically colored in the same way. Specifically, synaesthetes learned (...)
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  • The Extra Qualia Problem: Synaesthesia and Representationism.A. Wager - 1999 - Philosophical Psychology 12 (3):263-281.
    Representationism is the view that the phenomenal character of an experience supervenes on its representational content. Synaesthesia is a condition in which the phenomenal character of the experience produced in a subject by stimulation of one sensory modality contains elements characteristic of a second, unstimulated sensory modality. After reviewing some of the recent psychological literature on synaesthesia and one of the leading versions of representationism, I argue that cases of synaesthesia, as instances of what I call the extra qualia problem, (...)
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  • Synaesthesia: The Prevalence of Atypical Cross-Modal Experiences.J. Simner, C. Mulvenna, N. Sagiv, E. Tsakanikos, S. A. Witherby, C. Fraser, K. Scott & J. Ward - 2006 - Perception 35 (8):1024-33.
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  • The Phenomenology of Synaesthesia. E. Hubbard & V. Ramachandran - 2003 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (8):49-57.
    This article supplements our earlier paper on synaesthesia published in JCS. We discuss the phenomenology of synaesthesia in greater detail, raise several new questions that have emerged from recent studies, and suggest some tentative answers to these questions.
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    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Synaesthesia -- A Window Into Perception, Thought and Language.V. Ramachandran & E. Hubbard - 2001 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (12):3-34.
    We investigated grapheme-colour synaesthesia and found that The induced colours led to perceptual grouping and pop-out, a number rendered invisible through 'crowding' or lateral masking can induce synaesthetic colours -- a form of blindsight -- and peripherally presented graphemes did not induce colours even when they were clearly visible. Taken collectively, these and other experiments prove conclusively that synaesthesia is a genuine perceptual phenomenon, not an effect based on memory associations from childhood or on vague metaphorical speech. We identify different (...)
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  • Synaesthesia.Fiona Macpherson - 2007 - In Mario de Caro, Francesco Ferretti & Massimo Marraffa (eds.), Cartography of the Mind: Philosophy and Psychology in Intersection. Kleuwer.
    Synaesthesia is most often characterised as a union or mixing of the senses. i Richard Cytowic describes it thus: “It denotes the rare capacity to hear colours, taste shapes or experience other equally startling sensory blendings whose quality seems difficult for most of us to imagine” ([1995] 1997, 7). One famous example is of a man who “tasted shapes”. When he experienced flavours he also experienced shapes rubbing against his face or hands. ii Such popular characterisations are rough and ready. (...)
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  • Hearing Colors, Tasting Shapes.Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Edward M. Hubbard - 2003 - Scientific American (May):52-59.
    Jones and Coleman are among a handful of otherwise normal as a child and the number 5 was red and 6 was green. This the- people who have synesthesia. They experience the ordinary ory does not answer why only some people retain such vivid world in extraordinary ways and seem to inhabit a mysterious sensory memories, however. You might _think _of cold when you no-man’s-land between fantasy and reality. For them the sens- look at a picture of an ice cube, (...)
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  • Neurophysiology of Synesthesia.Edward M. Hubbard - 2007 - Current Psychiatry Reports 9 (3):193-199.
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  • Color Synesthesia.Berit Brogaard - forthcoming - In Kimberly A. Jameson (ed.), Cognition & Language, Encyclopedia of Color Science and Technology. Springer.
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  • How Do Synesthetes Experience the World.Malika Auvray & Ophelia Deroy - forthcoming - In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press.
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