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  1. Gravity and De Gravitatione: The Development of Newton’s Ideas on Action at a Distance.John Henry - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):11-27.
    This paper is in three sections. The first establishes that Newton, in spite of a well-known passage in a letter to Richard Bentley of 1692, did believe in action at a distance. Many readers may see this merely as an act of supererogation, since it is so patently obvious that he did. However, there has been a long history among Newton scholars of allowing the letter to Bentley to over-ride all of Newton’s other pronouncements in favour of action at a (...)
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  • Newtonian Emanation, Spinozism, Measurement and the Baconian Origins of the Laws of Nature.Eric Schliesser - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (3):449-466.
    The first two sections of this paper investigate what Newton could have meant in a now famous passage from “De Graviatione” (hereafter “DeGrav”) that “space is as it were an emanative effect of God.” First it offers a careful examination of the four key passages within DeGrav that bear on this. The paper shows that the internal logic of Newton’s argument permits several interpretations. In doing so, the paper calls attention to a Spinozistic strain in Newton’s thought. Second it sketches (...)
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  • Wonder in the Face of Scientific Revolutions: Adam Smith on Newton's ‘Proof’ of Copernicanism 1.Eric Schliesser - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (4):697.
    (2005). Wonder in the face of scientific revolutions: Adam Smith on Newton's ‘Proof’ of Copernicanism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 13, No. 4, pp. 697-732. doi: 10.1080/09608780500293042.
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  • Essays on Philosophical Subjects.Adam Smith & Dugald Stewart - 1982 - Glasgow Edition of the Works A.
    Enth.: Dugoald Stewart's account of Adam Smith / ed. by I.S. Ross.
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  • Deduction Versus Discourse: Newton and the Cosmic Phenomena. [REVIEW]Pierre Kerszberg - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (3):529-544.
    Deduction Versus Discourse: Newton and the Cosmic Phenomena Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-16 DOI 10.1007/s10699-011-9283-2 Authors Pierre Kerszberg, University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France Journal Foundations of Science Online ISSN 1572-8471 Print ISSN 1233-1821.
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  • A Spinoza Reader the Ethics and Other Works.Benedictus de Spinoza & E. M. Curley - 1994
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  • The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy.Isaac Newton - 1999 - University of California Press.
    Presents Newton's unifying idea of gravitation and explains how he converted physics from a science of explanation into a general mathematical system.
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  • Qualities, Properties, and Laws in Newton’s Induction.David Marshall Miller - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (5):1052-1063.
    Newton’s argument for universal gravitation in the Principia eventually rested on the third “Rule of Philosophizing,” which warrants the generalization of “qualities of bodies.” An analysis of the rule and the history of its development indicate that the term ‘quality’ should be taken to include both inherent properties of bodies and relations among systems of bodies, generalized into `laws'. By incorporating law‐induction into the rule, Newton could legitimately rebuff objections to his theory by claiming that universal gravitation was justified by (...)
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  • Newton’s Substance Monism, Distant Action, and the Nature of Newton’s Empiricism: Discussion of H. Kochiras “Gravity and Newton’s Substance Counting Problem”.Eric Schliesser - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):160-166.
    This paper is a critical response to Hylarie Kochiras’ “Gravity and Newton’s substance counting problem,” Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 40 267–280. First, the paper argues that Kochiras conflates substances and beings; it proceeds to show that Newton is a substance monist. The paper argues that on methodological grounds Newton has adequate resources to respond to the metaphysical problems diagnosed by Kochiras. Second, the paper argues against the claim that Newton is committed to two speculative doctrines attributed to (...)
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  • Newton and the Reality of Force.Andrew Janiak - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):127-147.
    : Newton's critics argued that his treatment of gravity in the Principia saddles him with a substantial dilemma. If he insists that gravity is a real force, he must invoke action at a distance because of his explicit failure to characterize the mechanism underlying gravity. To avoid distant action, however, he must admit that gravity is not a real force, and that he has therefore failed to discover the actual cause of the phenomena associated with it. A reinterpretation of Newton's (...)
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  • How the P Rincipia Got Its Name: Or, Taking Natural Philosophy Seriously.Andrew Cunningham - 1991 - History of Science 29 (86):377-392.
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  • Cotes’ Queries: Newton’s Empiricism and Conceptions of Matter.Zvi Biener & Chris Smeenk - 2012 - In Eric Schliesser & Andrew Janiak (eds.), Interpreting Newton. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 105-137.
    We argue that a conflict between two conceptions of “quantity of matter” employed in a corollary to proposition 6 of Book III of the Principia illustrates a deeper conflict between Newton’s view of the nature of extended bodies and the concept of mass appropriate for the theoretical framework of the Principia. We trace Newton’s failure to recognize the conflict to the fact that he allowed for the justification of natural philosophical claims by two types of a posteriori, empiricist methodologies. Newton's (...)
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  • Newton’s Challenge to Philosophy: A Programmatic Essay.Eric Schliesser - 2011 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (1):101-128.
    I identify a set of interlocking views that became (and still are) very influential within philosophy in the wake of Newton’s success. These views use the authority of natural philosophy/mechanics to settle debates within philosophy. I label these “Newton’s Challenge.”.
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  • Newton's "Experimental Philosophy".Alan Shapiro - 2002 - Early Science and Medicine 9 (3):185-217.
    My talk today will be about Newton’s avowed methodology, and specifically the place of experiment in his conception of science, and how his ideas changed significantly over the course of his career. I also want to look at his actual scientific practice and see how this influenced his views on the nature of the experimental sciences.
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  • Kant’s Dynamical Theory of Matter in 1755, and its Debt to Speculative Newtonian Experimentalism.Michela Massimi - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (4):525-543.
    This paper explores the scientific sources behind Kant’s early dynamic theory of matter in 1755, with a focus on two main Kant’s writings: Universal Natural History and Theory of the Heavens and On Fire. The year 1755 has often been portrayed by Kantian scholars as a turning point in the intellectual career of the young Kant, with his much debated conversion to Newton. Via a careful analysis of some salient themes in the two aforementioned works, and a reconstruction of the (...)
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  • Newton and Spinoza: On Motion and Matter (and God, of Course).Eric Schliesser - 2012 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):436-458.
    This study explores several arguments against Spinoza's philosophy that were developed by Henry More, Samuel Clarke, and Colin Maclaurin. In the arguments on which I focus, More, Clarke, and Maclaurin aim to establish the existence of an immaterial and intelligent God precisely by showing that Spinoza does not have the resources to adequately explain the origin of motion. Attending to these criticisms grants us a deeper appreciation for how the authority derived from the empirical success of Newton's enterprise was used (...)
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  • Halley's Ode on the Principia of Newton and the Epicurean Revival in England.W. R. Albury - 1978 - Journal of the History of Ideas 39 (1):24.
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  • Bentley, Newton, and Providence: The Boyle Lectures Once More.Henry Guerlac - 1969 - Journal of the History of Ideas 30 (3):307.
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  • Gravity and Newton’s Substance Counting Problem.Hylarie Kochiras - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (3):267-280.
    A striking feature of Newton’s thought is the very broad reach of his empiricism, potentially extending even to immaterial substances, including God, minds, and should one exist, a non-perceiving immaterial medium. Yet Newton is also drawn to certain metaphysical principles—most notably the principle that matter cannot act where it is not—and this second, rationalist feature of his thought is most pronounced in his struggle to discover ‘gravity’s cause’. The causal problem remains vexing, for he neither invokes primary causation, nor accepts (...)
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  • Getting the Game Right: Some Plain Words on The Identity and Invention of Science.Andrew Cunningham - 1988 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 19 (3):365.
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  • Newton's Fluxions and Equably Flowing Time.Richard T. W. Arthur - 1995 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (2):323-351.
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  • The Impact of Newton's Principia on the Philosophy of Science.Ernan McMullin - 2001 - Philosophy of Science 68 (3):279-310.
    As the seventeenth century progressed, there was a growing realization among those who reflected on the kind of knowledge the new sciences could afford (among them Kepler, Bacon, Descartes, Boyle, Huygens) that hypothesis would have to be conceded a much more significant place in natural philosophy than the earlier ideal of demonstration allowed. Then came the mechanics of Newton's Principia, which seemed to manage quite well without appealing to hypothesis (though much would depend on how exactly terms like "force" and (...)
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  • Existence, Actuality and Necessity: Newton on Space and Time.J. E. McGuire - 1978 - Annals of Science 35 (5):463-508.
    This study considers Newton's views on space and time with respect to some important ontologies of substance in his period. Specifically, it deals in a philosophico-historical manner with his conception of substance, attribute, existence, to actuality and necessity. I show how Newton links these “features” of things to his conception of God's existence with respect of infinite space and time. Moreover, I argue that his ontology of space and time cannot be understood without fully appreciating how it relates to the (...)
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  • Huygens's 1688 Report to the Directors of the Dutch East India Company on the Measurement of Longitude at Sea and the Evidence It Offered Against Universal Gravity.Eric Schliesser & George E. Smith - unknown
    When Christiaan Huygens prepared the 1686/1687 expedition to the Cape of Good Hope on which his pendulum clocks were to be tested for their usefulness in measuring longitude at sea, he also gave instructions to Thomas Helder to perform experiments with the seconds-pendulum. This was prompted by Jean Richer's 1672 finding that a seconds-pendulum is 1 1/4 lines shorter in Cayenne than in Paris. Unfortunately, Helder died on the voy¬age, and no data from the seconds-pendulum ever reached Huygens. He nevertheless (...)
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  • Robert Boyle on Epicurean Atheism and Atomism.JohnJ MacIntosh - 1991 - In Margaret J. Osler (ed.), Atoms, Pneuma, and Tranquillity: Epicurean and Stoic Themes in European Thought. Cambridge University Press. pp. 197--219.
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  • On the Notion of Field in Newton, Maxwell, and Beyond.Howard Stein - 1970 - In Roger H. Stuewer (ed.), Historical and Philosophical Perspectives of Science. Gordon & Breach. pp. 5--264.
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  • Isaac Newton y el problema de la acción a distancia.John Henry - 2007 - Estudios de Filosofía (Universidad de Antioquia) 35:189-226.
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  • Allgemeine Naturgeschichte und Theorie des Himmels.Immanuel Kant & Fritz Krafft - 1973 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 35 (2):400-400.
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